Bring Your Own Blog

BYO Super Tuesday Cabin Fever Spring Edition

13 Responses to “BYO Super Tuesday Cabin Fever Spring Edition”

  1. Pete B. says:

    I guess there’s more Lying Dog-Faced Pony Soldier fans out there.

  2. william riel jr says:

    The Way Back is getting pretty responses. Interesting. That formula still works if you know what you’re doing. I do agree that the trailers were lame.

  3. Stella's Boy says:

    If The Way Back is actually good I will be shocked. That trailer is just punishingly bad. Hardball meets Hoosiers. White man redeemed by poor kids of color. Looks straight out of 1998. Yuck.

    The Invisible Man is fantastic. Lives up to the hype. Great flick.

  4. Hcat says:

    ugh, already the second longest wait between Bond films in nearly six decades and we get another half year added?

    Absolute torture. Hope they are already working on selecting a new Bond an developing the next installment. They need to keep these no more than three years between them.

  5. Stella's Boy says:

    Saw the trailer today before Invisible Man. Does nothing for me. Not a huge Bond fan though.

  6. Hcat says:

    The trailer is a mishmash, the last entry was the weakest Craig but I will always hope for transcendence or at least a decent good time (I still occasionally check out new Simpsons and Saturday Night lives with the same optimism). I think the Craig run has been excellent though (I put Casino Royale up on a shortlist with Die Hard and Raiders as action manna) and hope they give him a decent send off. The series goes through highs and lows. ebbs and flows but it is always something to look forward to on the horizon. They can stop with Bat and Spider men but I hope Bond keeps going until I expire (though looking at the state of the world, everything could collapse before November).

    How was Invisible Man?

  7. Stella's Boy says:

    It is fantastic. As good as I hoped. Highly recommended.

  8. leahnz says:

    this real-life dumber version of ‘the stand’ blows

  9. Stella's Boy says:

    Did everyone else know a new Mark Wahlberg/Peter Berg movie was hitting Netflix today? I’m not saying that’s earth shattering but I had no idea that was being released today. And I try to pay close attention to this stuff. I remember when it was first announced but I’ve seen no promos for it whatsoever.

  10. Hcat says:

    The movie sounds like a perfect fit for Netflix. It seems like Jack Reacher helped prove there wasn’t a market anymore for this type of literary franchise adaption in theaters anymore, or at least one of a normal scope.

    And if there was ever a director who would benefit from not having his box office reported…… outside of Lone Survivor I don’t think any of Berg’s films were profitable in theatrical. He’s lucky to have Wahlberg pulling for him.

    Was reading some speculation on whether other films will bump their dates due to Coronavirus, and I have to think that Fast 9 looks like the most likely contender. China was what brought it into the black. But now the problem is that Universal already has Bond in the tight and crowded holiday window, are they going to want to sell both of them at the same time?

    And I just noticed that BOM had the runtime of F9 at over three hours. I know the charge of “that seems excessive” can be levelled at every single aspect of these films, but three hours? Based on their existing ratio they are going to need like 12 pages of dialogue to fill the time.

  11. Stella's Boy says:

    No I agree with all that Hcat. I just had no idea it was coming out today. Not sure if that’s me or Netflix.

  12. Hcat says:

    Maybe they are trying a new strategy, this title isn’t as high profile as Bright or Birdbox so they might feel they can experiment and just push out the awareness through their menu. If they pull enough eyeballs simply by placing it prominently on their menu they would save a bundle on internet ads increasing awareness of its existence. Their previous big marketing pushes have always seemed to be more about Netflix than the actual movie, “look we have a Sandra Bullock movie!” “Look Netflix has the Irishman!” “Ryan Reynold! Michael Bay! We’re a big boy studio!” It would be interesting to see if they can get eyeballs on a project just by presenting it without a marketing push or a thousand think pieces about “what to all the boys I’ve loved means to me.”

  13. Stella's Boy says:

    Yeah that’s fair. I guess I’m still getting used to this new world. It was only a few years ago that a new Wahlberg/Berg was a wide theatrical release with all the marketing that entails. Now it just gets dumped on Netflix with hardly any promotion. And yes as you said Netflix does seem like the right place for it. But I still find myself getting surprised sometimes when something like this happens.

MCN Commentary & Analysis See All

My Twitter Feed on Warner Media Th/Fri

David Poland | December 4, 2020

What Will Become Of The Movies?

David Poland | December 3, 2020

Thankful 2020

David Poland | November 26, 2020

The News Curated by Ray Pride See All

Twitter

Steven Zeitchik: "It's worth remembering -- because many people seem to have forgotten -- that before the pandemic U.S. movie theaters had their best two-year period ever, with a collective $23 billion in revenue. This isn't some dying model that digital needs to come in and save. Those sales, incidentally, likely include the many people who swear they will never go to a movie theater again. When the new Marvel or Jordan Peele or Mission: Impossible or Parasite comes only to theaters, I suspect they'll be lining up like they always have. What’s troubling is the false binary: streaming vs theaters. You can like both! Netflix is good and theaters are good! Institutions don't have to die just because something new is cool. And historically it takes more than one company in a strategically tough spot to kill a model. Of course ownership can change and experiences can change. We watched silent films and newsreels and serials in movie houses, and then we saw gritty crime films and pop films and dramatic films, and then 3-D films and franchise films. And there weren't showtimes and then there were showtimes, and seats weren't reserved and then they were reserved; we went from movie palaces to multiplexes to downtown dine-in rooms with reclining seats. And studios owned theaters and then families owned theaters and then entrepreneurs did and then big corporate chains and soon studios might own theaters again, and package movies as experiences or events or something new we haven't yet thought of. Of course it's theoretically possible an entire American institution just goes away. But given how durable it's been over the decades, I wouldn't bet on it. And certainly not because one company, for its own internal reasons, at one moment, needs to put its movies somewhere else."

Twitter | December 5, 2020

CNBC

"Stankey decided to use HBO as the centerpiece for a new mission: Build a true Netflix competitor, dubbed HBO Max. When Stankey took over as AT&T’s CEO, he passed that goal to new WarnerMedia CEO Jason Kilar, who previously launched Hulu. Stankey has dismantled the old Time Warner, spurring dozens of executives from all parts of the company to depart. He is attempting to funnel all of the company’s resources from cable, film, and HBO into HBO Max. Disney, Comcast’s NBCUniversal and ViacomCBS are all going through similar changes now to prepare for a world where subscription streaming services overtake cable as the world’s primary form of television consumption. Stankey — the MBA-buzzword, deep-voiced phone guy — was ahead of the trend. Still, his vision irritated some veteran WarnerMedia executives, who question Stankey’s knowledge of media. The execution of his mission, which Kilar has overseen since May, has been marred by strategic confusion and culture clashes, according to more than a dozen high-ranking WarnerMedia employees, about half of whom have left the company in the past six months. For now, investors don’t like what they see. AT&T is trading near a 10-year low."

CNBC | December 5, 2020

Twitter

Nicholas Kristof: "I've spent the last few months reporting this piece about Pornhub. What most people don't realize is that it's infested with rape videos. I talked to child trafficking survivors whose rape videos the company had distributed and monetized. Unconscionable. Let's be clear: The issue is not porn, it's rape. Just as the problem with Harvey Weinstein or Bill Cosby wasn't the sex but the lack of consent, it's the same with Pornhub. Search "13yo" on Pornhub, and you get more than 100,000 videos. There are playlists called "Under Age." A special question for Canada, because Pornhub is based in Montreal. Prime Minister Trudeau, you are rightly proud of your reputation as a feminist. So why does Canada host a company that inflicts rape videos on the world? It's not just Pornhub, of course. Companies have enjoyed impunity, so even as we prosecuted individuals like Jeffrey Epstein we allowed corporations like Mindgeek (which owns Pornhub) to monetize rape videos. Pornhub is Jeffrey Epstein times 1,000. Solutions are difficult and complicated. I don't have perfect ways to solve the problem of online child sexual abuse. But I do outline steps that would help. These survivors risked so much to tell their stories."

Twitter | December 5, 2020

Screen Daily

World's Second-Largest Exhibitor, Cineworld, Pledges Reopening March 2021, Post-Vaccine

Screen Daily | December 5, 2020

The Video Section See All

Mrs. America, Uzo Aduba

David Poland | September 8, 2020

The Podcast Section See All