The News Selected by Ray Pride See All

Twitter

A Quiet Place Part II Shushed Until September

Twitter | January 22, 2021

Vulture

Emerald Fennell: "I don’t work conceptually, or even in a genre-type way. Generally what happens is I’ve been thinking about something for a while. I’ve been thinking about consent, and the sort of raunch culture that I grew up with, and the kind of 'loopholes' that are exploited to take advantage of women and their bodies. With this movie, the first moment was — which is what usually happens for me — a very specific scene. The specific scene was a drunk girl on a bed having her clothes taken off and saying, drunkenly, 'What are you doing? What are you doing?' And then sitting up sober and saying, 'What are you doing?' That moment came fairly fully formed. From there, I knew who Cassie was and maybe what the film was going to be. I’m interested in Westerns and road movies and the revenge genre, and in particular, I think, kind of centering women and trying to wonder what … For me, it’s always like, What would I do? What could I do? I probably wouldn’t know where to get a gun, and I probably wouldn’t trust myself with one. I think that’s a reason women don’t resort to violence, and it very rarely ends well when they do. But what could I do? And I think that that’s what always interests me. It’s like, Okay, well, what I could do is fuck with people. I could frighten them. But it would have to be in a much more psychological and existential way. And so that was kind of the root of this, maybe: How do you write a revenge movie that feels like something real and that is based in real trauma and grief? Because I suppose the other thing with the revenge [genre] that we don’t talk about very much is revenge and vengeance aren’t good things. And I think that’s the thing that was always interesting about Cassie, and particularly the way Carey played her, was that she just did something I’ve never been able to do in my own life and just said, “Fuck off. Fuck off, everyone.'"

Vulture | January 22, 2021

Financial Times

"The best bits of a conference — the demonstrations, sales pitches and chance encounters — are impossible to replicate online. For everyday meetings, however, I think there is a better chance that video chat will outlast the pandemic. Zoom fatigue may be real but the shift to virtual meetings is one of the more helpful changes to have taken place in the past year. Not only do they cut out long commutes and jet-lagged business trips but they appear to have sharpened up start times and reduced cross-talk. Recorded meetings are very helpful for those of us who work with colleagues in different time zones, too."

"

Financial Times | January 22, 2021

The Guardian

"It's A Sin"'s Russell T. Davies: "And yet, at the same time, the world turns and life moves on. The growing success of antiretroviral medication means that, perhaps, an end is in sight. A deadly disease is becoming a manageable condition. There’s now an ambitious United Nations campaign dedicated to ending HIV transmission by 2030. Strange to think. That it might come and go within my lifetime. That a virus can be a moment in history and no more. I wonder. It’s possible that one day, HIV and AIDS might just be a memory. A story. Like some old drama that was once on TV."

The Guardian | January 22, 2021

After Its News Purge, Does Fox News "Deserve" A White House Berth?

January 22, 2021

The Guardian

Judi Dench On Harvey Weinstein: "Misjudged him? I don’t know that, Xan. He was a friend. He was a perfectly polite and funny and friendly person. I never experienced Harvey in any other way than that. I knew nothing untoward about him at all. And nor was I warned. So of course I can judge him. But I never experienced that other side of him at all.”

The Guardian | January 22, 2021

Chicago Tribune

80-year-old Tom Brokaw retires from NBC News after 55 years

Chicago Tribune | January 22, 2021

Twitter

“Baltimore philanthropists say they’ve got enough money to buy the Baltimore Sun, perhaps at twice the market value. Just one problem: big firms don’t want to sell local papers like the Sun, preferring to keep cutting and collect profits.”

David Simon: “They should start a new Baltimore newspaper, heavily weighted to on-line district, with that kind of cash. You hire up the good staff, pay them and produce a superior online news report. Without having to pay for trucks, presses and ink, it is wholly possible. Modest as hell compared to killing trees and getting them to doorsteps.”

Twitter | January 22, 2021

Do you fear death? No. Well, yes, of course.

Do you have hope? Hope for what? Not particularly, no.

Joan Didion

January 22, 2021

Hollywood Reporter

Dave Chappelle Cancels Austin Shows After Positive Test

From Earlier With Joe Rogan, Grimes, Donnell Rawlings, Michelle Wolf, Ron White, Elon Musk

Hollywood Reporter | January 22, 2021

Financial Times

"The situation at the Hartford Courant is a phenomenon seen across the country. Small and midsized regional and local newspapers, once swimming in cash and an essential service to Americans living outside New York or San Francisco, have been converted into distressed assets boomeranged among investors for short-term profits. Previously an industry stewarded by wealthy families, today about half of America’s daily newspapers are controlled by private equity, hedge funds and other investment groups, according to FT calculations, after endless rounds of consolidation in the wake of the 2008 global financial crisis. About one in four US newspapers, or almost 2,200 titles, have shuttered in the past 15 years, according to a University of North Carolina School of Journalism and Media report. Many of the remaining 6,700 publications have become what UNC calls “ghost newspapers”: shells of their former selves, stuffed with adverts and wire copy after years of gutting."

Financial Times | January 22, 2021

Japan Denies Murdoch's UK The Times Report Of No 2021 Tokyo Olympics That Would Start July 23

January 22, 2021

Filmmaker Magazine

Mike D'Angelo Compiles The 2020 "Village Voice Film Poll"

Filmmaker Magazine | January 21, 2021

Stuntman Rémy Julienne, 90, Over 1,400 Scenes Including Work On Six Bond Films; COVID-19

January 21, 2021

Twitter

Bond Moves To October 8

Twitter | January 21, 2021