By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Tom Shone Defends Dan Kois And Richard Schickel Against Dargis & Scott

“The top twenty most critically rated films of the year and the top twenty most popular films of the year have absolutely nothing in common with one another. It’s not that they stray and squabble over the occasional movie: they share not a single film between them. And yet A O Scott wants us to believe that the film critic community have a “lingering bias” against art movies, and a quiver of put-downs for any film which dares defy the “orthodoxies of escapist ideology”? He has to be joking.”
~ Tom Shone Defends Dan Kois And Richard Schickel Against Dargis et Scott

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Six rules for filmmaking from Mike Nichols
1. The careful application of terror is an important form of communication.
2. Anything worth fighting for is worth fighting dirty for.
3. There’s absolutely no substitute for genuine lack of preparation.
4. If you think there’s good in everybody, you haven’t met everybody.
5. Friends may come and go but enemies will certainly become studio heads.
6. No one ever lost anything by asking for more money.
~ Via Larry Karaszewski and Howard A. Rodman On Facebook

“I expected ‘Salesman’ to take the step backward every day that Chekhov and Beckett did — but no, it was there to help all the time. The circumstances are like a brick shithouse, they are so solid. You can’t really be satisfied, but I am pretty close to it because the cast took it and ran. They get better every day. I’ve never seen anything like that before, and I don’t know if I’ll ever see it again. Is my ambition sated? I don’t know. To get something right, it can’t be sated because you can’t ever get enough of it right—and even if it is right, it won’t stay right. That’s the thing about a play. But with ‘Salesman,’ it’s different. I don’t know how, but they just keep getting better each night. I really don’t think I’ll direct another play. This is as good a time as I’ve ever had, and I don’t want to fuck it up.”
~ Mike Nichols To Stephen Galloway At The Time Of “Death Of A Salesman”