By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Joe Berlinger

“Truman Capote’s  ‘In Cold Blood’ opened my eyes. That book gave birth to the true-crime genre. It was influential in how I wanted to go about making my true-crime films because Capote was kind of inventing a new form of literature called the nonfiction novel. It was the first time that journalistic technique was blended with fictional narrative technique. He was merging the form of the novel with a nonfiction story. I consider what I do the filmic equivalent of what Truman Capote was doing with literature. ‘Brother’s Keeper’ was an early expression of that idea—not straightforward documentaries, which are like an illustrated lecture of some subject, but to infuse dramatic narrative qualities in them.”
~ Joe Berlinger

 

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