By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

David Lowery On Music

“Daniel Hart, who’s written the score to all of my films, has a band called Dark Rooms. And while we were doing the score for ‘Pete’s Dragon,’ he was also beginning to record songs for his next record with his band. He played that song for me one morning and I just became obsessed with it. I couldn’t stop listening to it; I was just driving around LA listening to it constantly, and it was right in early days of developing the project. The script existed, but we were just starting to put the pieces together, and I went into the script and just wrote the song into the script. It became the emotional centerpiece of the movie. It felt exactly the way I want the movie to feel.

“There’s sort of a hopeless longing to his vocals in this song. It’s very, very sad, and we feel this sense of desperately reaching out for something you can’t quite grab. Those emotions are what this movie was all about. I felt that he had already accomplished what I wanted to do with this movie with that song, and the best thing I could do was to just, you know, borrow it, and let the song lend those qualities to the movie at key moments.There’s a lot going on there. It’s as rich and as beautiful and transportive as any film I could ever hope to make. Once we had that song in there, Daniel knew that the score would be incredibly vital. He felt that the rest of the score should play upon that song. So every piece of score begins with an element from that song. Whether it’s a little piece of the strings, or a little bit of the vocals, every piece of the score is based on that song. And from there it goes off into completely different directions.”
~ David Lowery On Music

Comments are closed.

Quote Unquotesee all »

What about replacing Mr. Spacey with another actor? Mr. Plummer, perhaps.
“That would theoretically be fantastic,” Mr. Rothman said he responded. “But I have supervised 450 movies over the course of my career. And what you are saying is impossible. There is not enough time.”
~ Publicizing Sir Ridley’s Deadline Dash

“Would I like to see Wormwood in a theater on a big screen? You betcha. I’d be disingenuous to argue otherwise. But we’re all part of, like it or not, an industry, and what Netflix offers is an opportunity to do different kinds of films in different ways. Maybe part of what is being sacrificed is that they no longer go into theaters. If the choice is between not doing it at all and having it not go to theaters, it’s an easy choice to make.”
~ Errol Morris