By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Bruce Beresford On The Digital Age

“The introduction of digital filmmaking means that virtually everyone connected with a film, and all too many not connected, can instantly be given copies on disc or simply by email of all the filmed material. It’s very easy to view this material at home or on an office desk, which means that snap judgments can be made by a large number of backroom meddlers. Further, the more technical of them can edit the scenes themselves on their own computers. It’s then a simple matter to get in touch with the director, on a set or on location, and inundate him with comments about what he’s shot along with advice on how to improve it. Despite all these difficulties many fine films are made all over the world; there are great directors in every country, dedicated to their art and imbued with the spirit that conquers every obstacle.”
~ Bruce Beresford On The Digital Age

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“I wondered how different it would be to write a novel and it’s totally different. It’s very internal. The weird thing about it is that I found that novel-writing was much more like directing than it is like screenwriting. You’re casting it, you’re lighting it, you’re doing the costumes, you’re doing the locations, you’re doing it all yourself as a director would. In screenwriting, you don’t do that stuff. You don’t describe the face of the actor or the character when you’re writing a screenplay because Tom Cruise is going to do it and he doesn’t look like that, whereas in the novel to describe what he is is what he is. The actual act of writing, just like shooting on a set, is a slow slog. It’s going to work every day.”
~ David Cronenberg On Screenplay vs. Novel

“I was fortunate to be in the two big film epics of the last part of the 20th century: Godfather and “Lonesome Dove” on television, which was my favorite part. That’s my “Hamlet.” The English have Shakespeare; the French, Molière. In Argentina, they have Borges, but the western is ours. I like that.”
~ Robert Duvall