Quotes

Manohla Dargis

“The idea that a movie might mean more than the latest box office numbers may sound, well, fantastically foreign, but that’s part of the pleasure of seeing films at Cannes, where art and industry retain a nervous, often precarious balance. Critics may like to grab copies of Variety on their way to screenings, but unlike the conversations in the halls and over dinners at, say, Sundance, the talk here doesn’t necessarily revolve around deals. One reason is that industry professionals and critics tend to see the movies in different theaters. This can be liberating, even if watching movies with hundreds of other critics can be at times predictably exasperating. At this early point, the critics have been largely well behaved or are perhaps too jet-lagged to put on their customary self-flattering show.”
~ Manohla Dargis 

Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1960 Cannes Statement

“Why do you think eroticism is so prevalent today in our literature, our theatrical shows, and elsewhere? It is a symptom of the emotional sickness of our time. But this preoccupation with the erotic would not become obsessive if Eros were healthy, that is, if it were kept within human proportions. But Eros is sick; man is uneasy, something is bothering him. And whenever something bothers him, man reacts, but he reacts badly, only on erotic impulse, and he is unhappy. The tragedy in L’avventura stems directly from an erotic impulse of this type: unhappy, miserable, futile. To be critically aware of the vulgarity and the futility of such an overwhelming erotic impulse, as is the case with the protagonist in L’avventura, is not enough or serves no purpose. And here we witness the crumbling of a myth that proclaims it is enough for us to know, to be critically conscious of ourselves, to analyze ourselves, in all our complexities and in every facet of our personality. The fact of the matter is that such an examination is not enough. It is only a preliminary step. Every day, every emotional encounter gives rise to a new adventure. For even though we know that the ancient codes of morality are decrepit and no longer tenable, we persist, with a sense of perversity that I would only ironically define as pathetic, in remaining loyal to them. Thus moral man, who has no fear of the scientific unknown, is today afraid of the moral unknown. Starting from this point of fear and frustration, his adventure can only end in a stalemate.”
~ Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1960 Cannes Statement

The Art of War,” Sun Tzu

“The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.”
~ “The Art of War,” Sun Tzu

Rush Limbaugh On Roger Ailes

“Ladies and gentlemen, I need to beg your indulgence for a few moments here before we get to the news of the day… One of my closest and dearest friends and colleagues passed away at six minutes after 8am this morning here in south Florida: Roger Ailes. Roger and I were passengers in history. I met Roger in around 1990 one night at dinner at the 21 Club in New York, and my life was never the same thereafter. There is, as we speak — and there has been for the past year — a barrage of slander and libel aimed at Roger by pissants, who will never accomplish even five percent of what he did. These are people that did not know him, that prejudged him, that were jealous. People who were envious, and people who felt the need to take down a serious enemy who threatened what they consider to be to be their rightful hold on the media, on America, or what have you. Some of the things being said just today about Roger Ailes are absolutely untrue.

“I would like for people know is the Roger Ailes that I know, the Roger Ailes that I knew: The brilliant, inspiring, motivating, compassionate, funny — the most naturally funny human being I have ever met. I’ve never encountered Roger Ailes in despair. He wouldn’t allow himself to be. I’ve never been around him when he was fatalistic or even depressed. Quite the opposite. He had virtually every characteristic of great leadership. And he knew it, and he was aware of it, and he used to it as best he could to try to get the best out of everybody that worked for him and worked with him. You’ll read all the things about how he got started on the Mike Douglas Show, essentially, in the mail room; ended up producing the program. You’ll read about the stories of him taking over the campaign successfully of Richard Nixon and George Bush. And I have my own stories of Roger Ailes and American presidential politics.”
~ Rush Limbaugh Extemporizes On His Friend Roger Ailes

Robert Pattinson

G”They’re definitely the place to be now. I mean, I have no idea what they’re doing, really. They’re just on it. They have a very good understanding of the Zeitgeist. You get a movie with them and it represents something. Everybody was talking a few years ago how cinema had died. And I think A24 and companies like that are—you know, people want to go to the cinema. People want to see movies. And I think they’re creating a kind of renaissance in filmmaking. They’re making people want to go to the cinema again to see this kind of stuff, rather than staying at home. People had thought that entire part of the industry had just died. And you can really see over the past few years, it really, really hasn’t at all. And I think it is down to companies like A24.”
~ Robert Pattinson

Michael Mann

“I was fascinated with a couple of things. One is human life in all of its dimensionality. That’s restricted, of course, in a drama like Heat, but it’s a lot more dimensional than archetypes. I’m really not interested in archetypes. In my research, I met a lot of people who are just gonna do what they’re gonna do. I believe [my characters] as people, and that allows me as a writer and director — and I believe audience members — to access them with more intensity. It leads us to believe them to a higher degree. That’s what I tend to be interested in. And, of course, when you’re making a film where worlds collide, you want the best characters possible. Characters who are quite extraordinary at what they do are attractive.” 
~ Michael Mann

David Lynch

“I don’t really think about style. It’s like a movie screen in your head: You see a thing and you hear a thing and you feel the mood. You just try to get every element as good as you can. Do your work. Catch those ideas that you fall in love with and make them realized.”
~ David Lynch

Steve Harvey

Good morning, everyone. Welcome back.
I’d like you all to review and adhere to the following notes and rules for Season 5 of my talk show.
There will be no meetings in my dressing room. No stopping by or popping in. NO ONE.
Do not come to my dressing room unless invited.
Do not open my dressing room door. IF YOU OPEN MY DOOR, EXPECT TO BE REMOVED.
My security team will stop everyone from standing at my door who have the intent to see or speak to me.
I want all the ambushing to stop now. That includes TV staff.
You must schedule an appointment.
I have been taken advantage of by my lenient policy in the past. This ends now. NO MORE.
Do not approach me while I’m in the makeup chair unless I ask to speak with you directly. Either knock or use the doorbell.
I am seeking more free time for me throughout the day.
Do not wait in any hallway to speak to me. I hate being ambushed. Please make an appointment.
I promise you I will not entertain you in the hallway, and do not attempt to walk with me.
If you’re reading this, yes, I mean you.
Everyone, do not take offense to the new way of doing business. It is for the good of my personal life and enjoyment.

Thank you all,

Steve Harvey

~ An Email To Steve Harvey’s 80-Person Staff, Largely Canned This Week

David Lynch

“Feature films are suffering a kind of bad time right now, in my opinion, because the feature films that play in theaters are blockbusters. That seems to fill the theaters, but the art-house cinema is gone. If I made a feature film, it might play in L.A. and New York, a couple of other places, for a week in a little part of a cineplex, and then it would go who knows where. I built ‘Twin Peaks’ to be on the big screen. It will be on a smaller screen, but it’s built for the big screen. You want a feature film to play on a big screen with big sound, utilizing all the best technology to make a world. It’s really tough after all that work to not get it in the theater. So I say that cable television is a new art house, and it’s good that it’s here.”
~ David Lynch

Robert De Niro

“We make movies to entertain audiences. Audiences vote by seeing them; critics vote by writing about them; and then posterity takes its time to decide if they’re art — or not. I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately because of our government’s hostility towards art. The budget proposal, among its other draconian cuts to life-saving and life-enhancing programs, eliminates the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. For their own divisive political purposes, the administration suggests that the money for these all-inclusive programs goes to rich liberal elites. This is what they now call an ‘alternative fact,’ but I call it bullshit. By being here tonight, you are supporting arts for everyone. You’re supporting the slapstick of Charlie Chaplin, the great body of work of Marty Scorsese and Barry Levinson, the dumb-ass comedies of Robert De Niro, the ‘overrated performances of Meryl Streep’ and your own taste and needs.”
~ Robert De Niro

“Acting is fucking boring to talk about. It really is! When a fan’s going, ‘How did you do that?’ it’s like, ‘How the fuck do I know?’ It’s what I do for a living. It’s a blessed thing to do. They pay you a fucking lot of money to get up and behave like a kid. Take all your fucking craziness out in what you do. When I get on the set, fucking anything goes. Know your lines, walk on the set, look at the other actors’ eyes, and then you fucking go for it. Milton Berle once said a great thing about so-called stardom. He said, “Better to be shit in a hit then a hit in shit.” When you’re part of something, even the smallest part, like in ‘Deadwood,’ everyone that had a part in it was as important as everybody. The whole show was what mattered. It’s like with ‘American Gods.’ It’s the show. I happen to be part of it and I’m going to be playing a lead in it. Which is great. I’m very grateful, whatever. But the whole thing around it is what makes it. It’s like they go, ‘Wow. What the fuck is this show?’ It’s not just about poor Mr. Wednesday.”
~ Ian McShane

Scorsese on Demme

“Whenever I ran into Jonathan, he was filled with enthusiasm and excitement about a new project. He took so much joy in moviemaking. His pictures have an inner lyricism that just lifts them off the ground—even a story like The Silence of the Lambs. I have great admiration for Jonathan as a filmmaker—I love the freshness of his style and his excellent use of music, from Buddy Holly to Miklos Rozsa. There’s so much more to be said, and I hardly know where to begin. I also loved him as a friend, and to me he was always young. My young friend. The idea that he’s gone seems impossible to me.”
~ Scorsese on Demme

Francis Coppola

“The golden times were when Hollywood was run by the owners. You know what the Chinese say? The best fertilizer is the footsteps of the owner. In those days, and even when I first worked, because I had the pleasure of working with Darryl Zanuck, Sam Goldwyn, Jack Warner, the owners ran the studios and competed with each other. They were all versions of Harvey Weinstein. Imagine six Harvey Weinsteins with his intelligence and talent — and his obnoxious vulgarity! — all vying to make the best movies and most commercial movies of the year. It was a magical element you can’t discount. “Who are the owners now? The owners are not there making the films. Instead highly paid executives are there whose names we don’t even know. It’s not the same movie business.”
~ Francis Coppola

Brad Pitt

“You strip down to the foundation and break out the mortar. I don’t know. For me this period has really been about looking at my weaknesses and failures and owning my side of the street. I’m an asshole when it comes to this need for justice. I don’t know where it comes from, this hollow quest for justice for some perceived slight. I can drill on that for days and years. It’s done me no good whatsoever. It’s such a silly idea, the idea that the world is fair. And this is coming from a guy who hit the lottery, I’m well aware of that. I hit the lottery, and I still would waste my time on those hollow pursuits.”
~ Brad Pitt

Javier Bardem

“So if I hate violence so much why did I do No Country For Old Men, right? I know, I know… But you should have seen me off camera, playing Anton on that movie… when the camera stopped rolling I would beg the Coen brothers, ‘Please take that gun out of my face guys, please.’ Man, they would be laughing their asses off. I mean, I love them; they’re geniuses. But it was tough. And I’ll never forgive them for that damn haircut.”
~ Javier Bardem

Ang Lee

“I believe in the space of the theatrical experience where you have a high priest — the director. You preach to your audience and sell them a movie, tell them a story.”
~ Ang Lee

Paula Scher

“Less is more and more is more. It’s the middle that’s not a good place.”
Paula Scher

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Feature films are suffering a kind of bad time right now, in my opinion, because the feature films that play in theaters are blockbusters. That seems to fill the theaters, but the art-house cinema is gone. If I made a feature film, it might play in L.A. and New York, a couple of other places, for a week in a little part of a cineplex, and then it would go who knows where. I built this to be on the big screen. It will be on a smaller screen, but it’s built for the big screen. You want a feature film to play on a big screen with big sound, and utilize all the best technology to make a world. It’s really tough after all that work to not get it in the theater. So I say that cable television is a new art house, and it’s good that it’s here.”
~ David Lynch

“The purpose of film isn’t to present the kindness of the world.”
~ Isabelle Huppert