MCN Blogs

Weekend Estimates by Kladysworth

Be our ticket buyers, be out ticket buyers, put our movie to the test. Buy 15 million tickets plus, and Disney does the rest. Potter girl, CG beast, why, the song count has increased! Set some records, mock the shouters, don’t believe them, ask bean counters! And most interesting of all, the big number for…

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Friday Estimates by Klady & The Klady

    Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Furious 7. The Hunger Games. Beauty & The Beast. These are the four biggest openings outside of the Summer or Holiday periods. Ever. Which of these things doesn’t go with the others? Why, that would be the family movie that plays to both young and old. Of…

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Tweet Review: Beauty & The Beast

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BYOB: MATRIX REBOOTED: No?

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Patti Smith in SONG BY SONG (1’04”)

[Via DAZED.]

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Weekend Estimates by Monkeying Around Klady

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Terrence Malick At SXSW (31’37”)

In Ultra-Contemporary Portrait Format!

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Friday Estimates by Klady: Box Office Island

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Picturing Terrence Malick’s SONG TO SONG

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Weekend Estimates by Kladyrine

          I’m interested in 1974 this weekend. Here are the top grossers that year (according to Box Office Mojo). Blazing Saddles, the #1 movie that year, opened on February 7. And only 3 of the 12 Top grossers on this chart opened in the summer that Nixon resigned. None of the…

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Friday Estimates by Wolverined Klady

A $47 million Friday last February for Fox’s biggest Marvel opening ever. $33 million yesterday for what will be Fox’s #3 or #4 best Marvel opening ever and probably Wolverine’s best. FUCK! Apologies if that offended your eyes, but that is what these two openings have in common. That and a lot of blood. Hard-R…

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Scorsese Announces The African Film Heritage Project (4’08”)

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Teasing David Fincher’s “Mindhunter” (0’59”)

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Terrence Malick For Guerlain (0’59”)

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BYOB: Oscar Night

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BYOB: RIP, Bill Paxton

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Weekend Estimates by Get Oscar Klady

Get Out dominates the Oscar weekend estimates, without clearly signaling how it will play over time. But figure the Sunday estimate is intentionally soft with Oscars happening with a strong Saturday that bodes well long-term for the horror/comedy/thriller. Rock Dog crapped on the living room rug. My Life as a Zucchini joins Get Out as…

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Friday Estimates by Out Getting Klady

You gotta love Universal’s sense of humor, putting Get Out on Oscar weekend. The story of a smart, attractive black guy being brought home to the white liberal family in the suburbs could be a metaphor for Moonlight at The Oscars.  I won’t extend the metaphor as to avoid spoilers for the movie). You should…

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Until 3/2, Matt Porterfield’s Lovely TAKE WHAT YOU CAN CARRY (30m)

Link here. From Grasshopper Film. More details.  

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Filmmaker Nathaniel Dorsky Invites Eastman Kodak Into His NYC Digs (13’51”)

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MCN Videos

DP/30see all »

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DP/30: Moonlight, Barry Jenkins

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Moonlight, Mahershala Ali

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Arrival, Joe Walker (super-sized chat w/ the editor)

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Lion, Greig Fraser (Feb 17… super-sized… no spoilers… good sound)

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“The worst thing that we have in today’s movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. It’s the destruction of our business. I have such respect and admiration for film criticism. When I was growing up film criticism was a real art. And there was intellect that went into that. And you would read Pauline’s Kael’s reviews, or some others, and that doesn’t exist anymore. Now it’s about a number. A compounded number of how many positives vs. negatives. Now it’s about, ‘What’s your Rotten Tomatoes score?’ And that’s sad, because the Rotten Tomatoes score was so low on Batman v Superman I think it put a cloud over a movie that was incredibly successful. People don’t realize what goes into making a movie like that. It’s mind-blowing. It’s just insane, it’s hurting the business, it’s getting people to not see a movie. In Middle America it’s, ‘Oh, it’s a low Rotten Tomatoes score so I’m not going to go see it because it must suck.’ But that number is an aggregate and one that nobody can figure out exactly what it means, and it’s not always correct. I’ve seen some great movies with really abysmal Rotten Tomatoes scores. What’s sad is film criticism has disappeared. It’s really sad.”
~ Brett Ratner Has A Sad

“The loss of a local newspaper critic is a real loss. People who know the local audience and know the local cultural scene are very important resources. You can’t just substitute the stuff that comes in from nowhere through syndication or the wire. I think at the same time, some of the newer outlets have really beefed up and improved their coverage and made room for criticism. The real problem is in the more specialized art forms — fine arts, classical music, dance and jazz, say. There is a real slowing of critical voices, partly because those art forms have smaller audiences. Newspapers and magazines can say that doesn’t get enough traffic, so we don’t have room for that. To me, that’s especially worrisome. This is the opposite of what newspapers are supposed to do, which is not to try to figure out what people are already interested in and recite that back to them, but to hopefully guide them to something that they should be interested in, connecting potential audiences with more interesting work.

“Then again, not everyone needs a critic. People have been going to movies for more than 100 years now, and probably the vast majority of those people have not read movie reviews or cared what critics thought. But there has always been an important subset that wants to know more, that wants to think about what they’ve seen and what they’re going to see, and wants someone to think along with. I think critics are important, not just as dispensers of consumer advice — though that’s certainly part of it, too — but as trusted voices and companions for people to argue with in your head when you’re going to movies or afterwards.”
~ A. O. Scott