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MCN Videos

The Torontonian reviews This Is Where I Leave You

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Like a middling episode of House-”Arrested Development,” Shawn Levy’s This Is Where I Leave You—adapted from the Jonathan Tropper novel of the same name—is a dysfunctional family dramedy lacking in laughs and an emotional punch to really bring it home. The film gets by on its likable cast, but the fact that this film merely passes despite such a talented crop of comedic talent should speak to a general failure, or at least a sense of disappointment.

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Wrapping TIFF 2014

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It was a really good TIFF. Solid.

What was missing, really, were the home run hitting feature films. (Great docs… but we expect that.)

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Confessions of a Film Festival Junkie: It’s a Wrap

The Theory of Everything

Officially there were 366 features shown at the just completed edition of the Toronto International Film Festival. I saw about 30. So it should come as no surprise that few of this year’s public and jury prize winners managed to elude my grasp.

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The Torontonian reviews It Follows

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One of the most enjoyable aspects of David Robert Mitchell’s It Follows—alongside its brilliant cinematography and chilling scares—is the inventive premise, which is as much to fun to describe as it is to watch (tell your friends about the “sexually-transmitted ghost” movie and watch their faces turn from disgusted to wildly amused).

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Confessions of a Film Festival Junkie

A Pigeon Sat

It’s kinda official. To be honest I really haven’t noticed anyone taking notice of the fact that Toronto mayor Rob Ford hasn’t shown his face at the Toronto International Film Festival. Granted the local attendees don’t appear to be his constituency and there is a mayoral race coming up before the end of the year. In fact, there either was a debate scheduled (there are three others on the ballot) or one that went forward that Ford opted out of without extending much of a reason.

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The Torontonian Reviews NIGHTCRAWLER

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Confessions of a Film Festival Junkie: Toronto 2014 – Getting Started

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The Torontonian reviews Eden

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Confessions Of A Film Festival Junkie: TIFF 2014 Opening Days

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The TIFF 2014 Doc Sneak: Thom Powers Lays It Out For You

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The Torontonian Reviews GRAVITY

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The Torontonian Reviews UNDER THE SKIN

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The Torontonian Reviews PRISONERS

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The Torontonian Reviews PARKLAND

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The Torontonian Reviews BLUE RUIN

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MCN Videos

DP/30see all »

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John Boorman, Queen & Country (and more)

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The Hunting Ground, Kirby Dick & Amy Ziering

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McFarland USA, Niki Caro

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Interstellar, Hans Zimmer

MCN Festivals

“People want to go home and have sex after your movie. Don’t make them feel urggghh. Don’t do that to your fellow sexually active people.”
In Toronto, Michael Moore Reminds Documentarians To Entertain 

“I’m telling you straight and true that Paul Dano‘s performance as the youngish Brian Wilson in Bill Pohlad‘s Love and Mercy is almost spookily great.”
Avers Jeff Wells

NY Times

“This movie was born in a blaze, and will be released in a blaze.”
Kevin Smith’s Tusk Gets Medicinal Marijuana Tie-In severe spoiler

NY Times

“People could call him a sociopath. But I wouldn’t at all. I would call it the birth of an artist. It’s poetry to him.”
Jake Gyllenhaal Tries A Festival-Friendly PR Tack For Nightcrawler

“I’m not sure if I’m allowed to talk about it yet, but screw it: I love this nasty little movie! It’s f—ing bonkers, and I can’t wait for you to see it.”
Kyle Buchanan Serves T. O. Buzz With His Starred-Up 15 Picks For The Fest

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Quote Unquotesee all »

“Chad Harbach spent ten years writing his novel. It was his avocation, for which he was paid nothing, with no guarantee he’d ever be paid anything, while he supported himself doing freelance work, for which I don’t think he ever made $30,000 a year. I sold his book for an advance that equated to $65,000 a year—before taxes and commission—for each of the years of work he’d put in. The law schools in this country churn out first-year associates at white-shoe firms that pay them $250,000 a year, when they’re twenty-five years of age, to sit at a desk doing meaningless bullshit to grease the wheels of the corporatocracy, and people get upset about an excellent author getting $65,000 a year? Give me a fucking break.”
~ Book Agent Chris Parris-Lamb On The State Of The Publishing Industry

INTERVIEWER
Do you think this anxiety of yours has something to do with being a woman? Do you have to work harder than a male writer, just to create work that isn’t dismissed as being “for women”? Is there a difference between male and female writing?

FERRANTE
I’ll answer with my own story. As a girl—twelve, thirteen years old—I was absolutely certain that a good book had to have a man as its hero, and that depressed me. That phase ended after a couple of years. At fifteen I began to write stories about brave girls who were in serious trouble. But the idea remained—indeed, it grew stronger—that the greatest narrators were men and that one had to learn to narrate like them. I devoured books at that age, and there’s no getting around it, my models were masculine. So even when I wrote stories about girls, I wanted to give the heroine a wealth of experiences, a freedom, a determination that I tried to imitate from the great novels written by men. I didn’t want to write like Madame de La Fayette or Jane Austen or the Brontës—at the time I knew very little about contemporary literature—but like Defoe or Fielding or Flaubert or Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky or even Hugo. While the models offered by women novelists were few and seemed to me for the most part thin, those of male novelists were numerous and almost always dazzling. That phase lasted a long time, until I was in my early twenties, and it left profound effects.
~ Elena Ferrante, Paris Review Art Of Fiction No. 228

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