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Sundance Seen Part 1

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The whispering of powder from a dull quiet sky. Snowflakes fall between the screenings. Then the sun is bright and powder dusts off the slopes.

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Sundance Reviews: The Wolfpack, Slow West

Unique ironies surround Crystal Moselle’s bewildering documentary, The Wolfpack, not the least of which is that the film opens with a group of brothers at home re-enacting Reservoir Dogs, a film that premiered at Sundance 23 years ago.

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Six Films To Watch At Sundance

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Attending Sundance this year means personally jumping through a lot of difficult hoops to make it happen, but this festival is becoming legendary—2014’s iteration eclipsed both Cannes and TIFF combined—and I simply couldn’t skip this year.

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Sundance 2014 Last Call

Happiness

As a documentarian, Balmès shows more than tells; his work tends to curate moments that strike him as meaningful into a largely abstract tapestry and let you make of them what you will. Consequently, Happiness is not a neatly delineated picture of narrative storytelling, nor is it quite traditionally structured documentary. True to form, the director’s work here tends toward the languid and fluid; we float gently along the placid life rhythm of this small village on a faraway mountaintop as the camera captures the subtle – and sometimes not so subtle – shifts in the cultural and social landscape wrought by the march of technological progress.

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Sundance 2014 Review: The Better Angels

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A film created to be seen on a big screen, where the gorgeous cinematography can fill your soul. Dialogue is sparse, used only to augment the narration and visuals, with the result that in many ways feels almost like watching a silent film with narration over it. Or perhaps, to be more accurate, it’s like immersing yourself into a black-and-white landscape of stunning beauty, where there happens to be this story happening around you. Edwards’ time spent as a cameraman on Malick’s films is evident here in the framing of shots, the extensive use of nature in storytelling, and his willingness to let his tale breathe in quiet spaces.

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Sundance 2014 Review: Listen Up Philip

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Sundance 2014 Review: What We Do In The Shadows

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Sundance 2014 Review: War Story

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Picturing Sundance 2014: 21 Images

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Sundance 2014 Review: Imperial Dreams

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Picturing Sundance 2014 x 13 (Plus 140-Character Grasps For Instantaneous Truth)

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Sundance 2014 Review: Obvious Child

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Sundance 2014 Review: Boyhood

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Sundance 2014 Review: I Origins

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Sundance 2014 Review: Hellion

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MCN Videos

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Kubo & The Two Strings, Art Parkinson, Travis Knight

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Florence Foster Jenkins, Simon Helberg

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Pete’s Dragon, David Lowery

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TIFF 2016 Docs w/ Programmer Thom Powers

MCN Festivals

“F— it. Give me a Stella and a vodka and I will double-fist for the rest of the night.”
Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award-Winner Lake Bell On Needing To Breathe Through Her Butt More

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“Hitchcock films the story with a wide-eyed, astonished, fascinated, and disturbed camera stare that seems to shudder and tremble every time Hedren is onscreen. Even the director’s cameo—in which he watches Hedren walking down a hotel corridor and then turns back to look at the camera, shamefacedly caught in his own leer—suggests his self-aware sense of visual carnality. The images offer an extraordinary swing between blasts of heat and an eerie chill, sometimes bringing the two together. Even the film’s exterior locations have a fluorescent buzz that captures an ambient sense of derangement.”
~ Richard Brody on Marnie

 

“HBO’s investment in these outlets for criticism belies an approach that blends the show itself with discussion about the show to create an overarching viewer experience. It’s not just the plot that entertains, but also theorizing, exploring the world’s mythology, and more that has engaged book readers for decades — and those aspects are now part of what HBO is producing, not just something happening at whatever passes for a water cooler or comic book shop these days. Benioff, Weiss, and HBO are blending entertainment and criticism into one giant, all-encompassing amalgamation of content. Something as grandiose and, indeed, as stunning, as ‘Game of Thrones’ requires it.”
#Content: Expanding Entertainment, Collapsing CriticismBy Matt Hartman

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