Press Releases Archive for July, 2017

Traverse City Film Fest At 13 Has Over 120,000 Admissions

The 2017 Traverse City Film Festival(TCFF), founded by Michael Moore in 2005, offered 229 screenings of 115 feature films and 66 shorts in its 13th year. The annual celebration of film welcomed over 120,000 admissions across 12 different venues, including 12 film school classes, six free filmmaker panels, seven parties, two live podcasts, and a gaming…

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Next HBO Series From Showrunners Of “Game On Thrones,” Will Build “A Third American Civil War” In A Parallel Timeline Where The Confederacy Won

Series Will Be Executive Produced And Written By David Benioff And D.B. Weiss; Nichelle Tramble Spellman, Malcolm Spellman, Carolyn Strauss And Bernadette Caulfield Will Also Executive Produce “Game of Thrones” creators/showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss will return to HBO with their new original series CONFEDERATE, it was announced today by Casey Bloys, president, HBO…

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GKIDS To Reissue Studio Ghibli Catalog

[pr] KIDS IN DEAL FOR HOME ENTERTAINMENT RIGHTS TO STUDIO GHIBLI CATALOG  BLU-RAY AND DVD REISSUES BEGIN WITH 8 CLASSIC TITLES IN OCTOBER 2017 GKIDS, the acclaimed producer and distributor of animation for adult and family audiences, has announced that it is partnering with Studio Ghibli to handle the famed Japanese animation studio’s catalog in North…

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THE BLACK LIST AND WOMEN IN FILM LOS ANGELES LAUNCH INAUGURAL FEATURE FILM LAB FOR FEMALE WRITERS AND ANNOUNCE SECOND-ANNUAL EPISODIC TV LAB

(Los Angeles, CA, July 17, 2017) – The Black List and Women In Film (WIF), LA announced today that they will again partner on an episodic TV lab for women writers, now in its second year, and will join forces for a newly inaugurated Film Feature Lab for women screenwriters. The Black List/Women In Film Episodic Lab will…

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Outfest Los Angeles Fetes Winners

 OUTFEST LOS ANGELES LGBT FILM FESTIVAL  ANNOUNCES 2017 AWARD WINNERS Los Angeles, July 16, 2017 – Outfest – the Los Angeles-based nonprofit organization promoting equality by creating, sharing, and protecting LGBT stories on the screen – has announced the award winners of its 2017 Outfest Los Angeles LGBT Film Festival, presented by HBO. The nation’s leading LGBT…

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Academy Sets Year-Long Exhibition Residency At Metrograph

THE ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE ARTS AND SCIENCES ANNOUNCES YEAR-LONG RESIDENCY AT METROGRAPH THEATER NEW YORK NEW YORK, NY – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced today a yearlong residency at Metrograph Theaters in New York City, beginning July 24, that will showcase high quality film prints from the Academy Film Archive, home…

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CHARLIE SHEEN’S “9/11” ACQUIRED BY ATLAS DISTRIBUTION

CHARLIE SHEEN’S “9/11” ACQUIRED BY ATLAS DISTRIBUTION  U.S. THEATRICAL RELEASE DATE SET FOR SEPTEMBER 8, 2017  (Los Angeles, July 11, 2017) Atlas Distribution Company announced today that they have acquired the theatrical distribution rights to Charlie Sheen’s new dramatic film, 9/11. A wide US theatrical release date for 9/11 has been set for September 8, 2017. Fox Home Entertainment will be handling the home video release including VOD, Digital HD, and DVD. The film features an award winning cast led by Golden GlobeR winner Charlie Sheen and Academy AwardR winnerWhoopi Goldberg, along with Luis Guzman (The Taking of Pelham 1,2,3), Gina Gershon (Showgirls), Wood Harris(Justified), Jacqueline Bisset (Dancing on the Edge (BBC), Welcome to New York), Olga Fonda (The Vampire Diaries)and Bruce Davison (ABC TV’s The Fosters). Atlas’ President, Harmon Kaslow, stated, “9/11 is an inspiring story told with the sincerest of intent, and we’re very proud to help usher in Charlie Sheen’s return to dramatic roles.”   9/11 was directed by award winning filmmaker and Grammy nominated Music Producer/Engineer MartinGuigui, written by Martin Guigui and Steven Golebiowski, produced by Dahlia Waingort, WarrenOstergard, and Martin Sprock, and executive produced by David Cuddy, Rodric David, Mark Burg, andRyan Johnson. “We’re extremely pleased to have Atlas Distribution and Fox on board and are very much looking forward to the thefilm’s release this Fall.” said Producer Dahlia Waingort. Based on actual events and voicemail messages, 9/11 tells the story of five people trapped in an elevatorin the World Trade Center’s North Tower on September 11th, 2001. Having no comprehension of what has…

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Annapurna Pictures Will Be Released By Fox Home Entertainment

[PR]  Kathryn Bigelow’s DETROIT to be First Film Released Under New Agreement Annapurna and Twentieth Century Fox Film announced a multi-year home entertainment deal. Under the terms of the new partnership, Fox will service the U.S. home entertainment rights for all Annapurna-produced pictures across physical, Digital HD and TVOD platforms. Kathryn Bigelow’s DETROIT will be…

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Barry Jenkins To Adapt James Baldwin’s “If Beale Street Could Talk”

[PR] On the heels of Barry Jenkins’ Academy Award Best Picture Moonlight, Jenkins is set to start production of If Beale Street Could Talk in October 2017. Based on the novel by James Baldwin, If Beale Street Could Talk, is the story of Tish, a newly engaged Harlem woman who races against the clock to prove her lover’s innocence while carrying…

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Michael Moore’s Traverse City Film Fest Will Close With Detroit

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE TRAVERSE CITY FILM FESTIVAL 2017 WILL CLOSE WITH KATHRYN BIGELOW’S “DETROIT” TRAVERSE CITY, MI July 5, 2017 — The 13th annual Traverse City Film Festival (TCFF) is proud to announce as its Closing Night Film “Detroit,” the highly anticipated new film by Academy Award-winning director Kathryn Bigelow, one of the greatest directors working today. Following…

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ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY GOES ATOMIC AT COMIC-CON 2017

For Immediate Release ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY GOES ATOMIC AT COMIC-CON 2017 Atomic Blonde Star and Producer Charlize Theron to Debut EW’s First-Ever Icon Edition of “Women Who Kick Ass” Panel   NEW YORK, NY (July 5, 2017) – Time Inc.’s (NYSE: TIME) ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY plans to raise the bar even higher at Comic-Con 2017 by presenting…

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SAG-AFTRA And AMPTP Reach Tentative Agreement

SAG-AFTRA REACHES TENTATIVE AGREEMENT WITH AMPTP ON SUCCESSOR CONTRACTS COVERING MOTION PICTURES, TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA LOS ANGELES (July 4, 2017) — Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA) today announced it has reached a tentative agreement with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP) on successor agreements covering motion pictures, scripted…

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Press Releases

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin