Press Releases Archive for January, 2017

Latest Tommy O’Haver And Joe Swanberg Joints Direct To Netflix After SXSW Bow

Netflix original films Win It All, from filmmaker Joe Swanberg and starring Jake Johnson, Aislinn Derbez and Keegan-Michael Key, and The Most Hated Woman in America featuring Academy Award® winner Melissa Leo, Adam Scott and Juno Temple, will make their world premieres at the 2017 SXSW Film Festival in March before launching on Netflix. A true-crime biopic about the disappearance of Madalyn Murray O’Hair,…

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True/False Sets Media Literacy Initiative

  JANUARY 30, 2017 True/False Film Fest TRUE/FALSE MEDIA LITERACY INITIATIVE The Media Literacy Initiative is True/False’s ambitious new educational partnership with Ragtag Cinema, Columbia Public Schools, and the Columbia Public Schools Foundation. After more than 10 years of high school programming, T/F recognized that students are often already documentarians. Constantly recording, archiving and compiling…

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And Sundance Awards…

And Sundance Awards…

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Santa Monica’s 30-Year-Old Vidiots Closing Doors, But Expanding Activities

VIDIOTS TO MOVE FROM HISTORIC SANTA MONICA LOCATION AND TRANSITION TO NEW HOME The beloved video store-turned film non-profit will close the doors of its original location on February 15, but will maintain many of its services and programs as it identifies a new location Vidiots, the nonprofit film foundation, video store and longtime resource…

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2017 Oscar Nominations

Best Picture Arrival – Shawn Levy, Dan Levine, Aaron Ryder and David Linde, Producers Fences – Scott Rudin, Denzel Washington and Todd Black, Producers Hacksaw Ridge – Bill Mechanic and David Permut, Producers Hell or High Water – Carla Hacken and Julie Yorn, Producers Hidden Figures – Donna Gigliotti, Peter Chernin, Jenno Topping, Pharrell Williams…

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Academy Outlines Prerecorded Oscar Nomination Anecdotes From Brie Larson, Jason Reitman, Gabourey Sidibe, Ken Watanabe And Others

Tuesday, January 24 5:18 a.m. PST/8:18 a.m. EST/1:18 p.m. GMT/9:18 p.m. CST To help guide this year’s nominees through the 33 days between the nominations announcement and the Oscars ceremony, the Academy invited 11 Oscar-winning and nominated Academy members to share personal anecdotes about their Oscars experience and offer advice to the new class of…

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League-Quinn Neon Label Makes First On-Site Sundance Acquisition

  In a competitive bidding situation, Tom Quinn and Tim League’s new distribution banner, Neon, have acquired the U.S. distribution rights to Sundance breakout, Ingrid Goes West, following the world premiere on Friday night. Directed by Matt Spicer and starring Aubrey Plaza (Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates, “Parks and Recreation”) and Elizabeth Olsen (Avengers: Age…

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True/False Film Fest Names 2017 True Life Fund Film

The indomitable Rainey family, featured in the new film Quest, have been selected as 2017’s True Life Fund recipients. The fund, True/False’s yearly philanthropic initiative, serves as a tangible way of thanking documentary subjects. “The True Life Fund represents us completing a circuit,” T/F co-director David Wilson says. “The film subjects share their stories, and…

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Annapurna Pictures Distribution Launches August 4 With Kathryn Bigelow’s Untitled Detroit Project

ANNAPURNA PICTURES LAUNCHES NEW FULL SERVICE MARKETING AND DISTRIBUTION OPERATION Kathryn Bigelow’s UNTITLED DETROIT PROJECT will be the company’s inaugural release, hitting theaters nationwide on August 4, 2017 Los Angeles, CA (January 20, 2017) – Annapurna Pictures is launching its long-planned, full-ervice distribution and marketing operation with Kathryn Bigelow’s UNTITLED DETROIT PROJECT.  Marc Weinstock, who…

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A24 To Make Donation To Planned Parenthood On Film Opening

A24 WILL MAKE A DONATION TO PLANNED PARENTHOOD IN HONOR OF ALL THE WOMEN (AND MEN) WHO SEE THE FILM THIS WEEKEND Writer/director Mike Mills and stars Greta Gerwig and Elle Fanning reflect on those who raise us and the times that shape us in latest video ‘Modern Women’, featuring an exclusive interview with Planned…

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Martin Short to Receive Oscar Wilde Award

[PR] The Oscar Wilde Awards will not be short of laughter with Martin Short receiving an award at the February 23rdevent at J.J. Abrams’ Bad Robot in Santa Monica.  The US-Ireland Alliance’s annual event will also honour Irish singer-songwriter Glen Hansard and “Outlander” star Caitriona Balfe. US-Ireland Alliance founder Trina Vargo notes that Short’s father was from Northern…

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GKIDS Names David Jesteadt President

GKIDS, the producer and distributor of award-winning animation for both adult and family audiences, announced today that David Jesteadt has been appointed to the role of President. GKIDS founder Eric Beckman will continue to serve as CEO.  Jesteadt joined GKIDS in 2007 and has served a variety of roles within the company, most recently as…

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Oscar Scraps Dawn Nominations Presser For Online Live Stream And Featured Placement On ABC’s “Good Morning America”

  [PR] We’ve got exciting news. To welcome our new class of nominees, several Oscar®-winning and nominated Academy members including Jennifer Hudson, Brie Larson, Emmanuel Lubezki, Jason Reitman and Ken Watanabe will join Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs to reveal the 89th Oscars® Nominations, on Tuesday, January 24, beginning at 5:18 a.m. PST/8:18 a.m. EST/1:18…

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Annapurna Promotes Chelsea Barnard To President Of Film

ANNAPURNA PICTURES PROMOTES CHELSEA BARNARD TO PRESIDENT OF FILM Barnard will continue to serve her role as Chief Creative Officer for the company and is currently an Executive Producer on Mike Mills’ Golden Globe-nominated film, 20th CENTURY WOMEN. Annapurna Pictures has promoted Chelsea Barnard to President of Film, it was announced today by Founder and…

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89TH ANNUAL OSCAR NOMINATIONS PANEL, JANUARY 24, 2017

GENE SISKEL FILM CENTER KICKS OFF AWARDS SEASON WITH 89TH ANNUAL OSCAR NOMINATIONS PANEL, JANUARY 24, 2017 Alison Cuddy Moderates Panel Discussion Featuring Film Critics J.R. Jones, Sergio Mims, Pamela Powell, Ray Pride and Dean Richards CHICAGO — The Gene Siskel Film Center (GSFC) of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) presents the…

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2016 National Film Critics Society Awards

Best Picture: Moonlight Best Actor: Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea Best Actress: Isabelle Huppert, Elle, Things to Come Best Supporting Actor: Mahershala Ali, Moonlight Best Supporting Actress: Michelle Williams, Manchester by the Sea Best Director: Barry Jenkins, Moonlight Best Screenplay: Kenneth Lonergan, Manchester by the Sea Best Cinematography:  James Laxton, Moonlight Best Foreign Film: Toni Erdmann Film Heritage Award:  “Pioneers of African-American…

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SPC Takes Worldwide On Latest Luca Guadagnino

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS TAKES WORLDWIDE RIGHTS TO LUCA GUADAGNINO’S  CALL ME BY YOUR NAME NEW YORK (January 6, 2017) – Sony Pictures Classics announced today that they have acquired worldwide rights to Luca Guadagnino’s CALL ME BY YOUR NAME.  The film, based on André Aciman’s acclaimed novel of the same name, is directed by Guadagnino (I AM LOVE, A BIGGER SPLASH,…

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Houston Film Critics Society Awards

La Land Land Director — Damien Chazelle Screenplay — Hell Or High Water Actor — Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea Actress — Natalie Portman, Jackie Supporting Actor — Jeff Bridges, Hell Or High Water Supporting Actress — Viola Davis, Fences Animated Film — Kubo and the Two Strings Documentary — O.J.: Made in America Foreign…

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“Women’s March On Main” Will Hit Park City Alongside Women’s March On Washington

WOMEN’S MARCH ON MAIN Park City, UTOrganizing Committee Member Chelsea Handler will lead the Park City sister march to take place in conjunction with the Women’s March on Washington WHAT: The creative and Park City communities come together to stand in solidarity with the rest of the country in demonstrating universal respect for social justice…

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STX Takes On Europacorp Theatrical Distribution

STX MOTION PICTURES GROUP AND EUROPACORP ENTER INTO MULTI-YEAR THEATRICAL MARKETING AND DISTRIBUTION AGREEMENT  EuropaCorp’s “Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets,” “The Circle,” “Renegades” and “Their Finest”  to be released by STX Motion Pictures Group in 2017 (Burbank, CA and Beverly Hills, CA – January 3, 2017) — STX Motion Pictures Group, a…

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Press Releases

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin