Press Releases Archive for January, 2016

HBO, Magnolia In Pink With Sundance Doc Tickled

[PR]  HBO has acquired the U.S. television rights to the shocking Sundance documentary, TICKLED, while MAGNOLIA has picked up North American theatrical rights, and world rights outside of North America excluding Australia and New Zealand.  Co- directed by David Farrier & Dylan Reeve and produced by Carthew Neal, TICKLED is about a journalist who stumbles upon a “competitive endurance tickling” competition….

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The Complete 22nd Annual SAG Awards List

Outstanding Film and Television Performances Honored at the 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards® LOS ANGELES (Jan. 30, 2016) —The Screen Actors Guild Awards® presented its coveted Actor® statuettes for the outstanding motion picture and primetime television performances of 2015 at the 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards® held Saturday, Jan. 30 at the Los…

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Sundance Awards 2016

Sundance Institute tonight announced the prizes in feature filmmaking at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival, with top awards going to Between Sea and Land, The Birth of a Nation, First Girl I Loved, Jim: The James Foley Story, Sand Storm, Sonita and Weiner. The Birth of a Nation and Sonita won both the Grand Jury…

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Sony Classics Adopts John Krasinski Sundance Pic

  [PR] NEW YORK (January 29, 2016) – Sony Pictures Classics announced today that they have acquired all rights in the US and Asia to John Krasinski’s THE HOLLARS.   Directed by Krasinski (BRIEF INTERVIEWS WITH HIDEOUS MEN) with a script from Jim Strouse (PEOPLE PLACES THINGS), the film is premiering tonight at the Sundance Film Festival….

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“MAD MAX: FURY ROAD,” “THE BIG SHORT” AND “INSIDE OUT” WIN BIG AT THE 66TH ANNUAL ACE EDDIE AWARDS RECOGNIZING THE BEST FILM EDITING OF THE YEAR

Beverly Hills, January 29 – “Mad Max: Fury Road” (edited by Margaret Sixel) and “The Big Short” (edited by Hank Corwin, ACE) won Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) and Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy) respectively at the 66th Annual ACE Eddie Awards tonight where trophies were handed out recognizing the best editing of 2015 in ten…

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Slamdance 2016 Announces Audience And Jury Prizes

  [PR]  (PARK CITY, UT – January 28, 2016) – The 22nd Slamdance Film Festival tonight announced the feature and short film recipients of this year’s Sparky awards in the Audience, Jury, and Sponsored Categories. The award winners were announced at the festival’s annual Awards Ceremony at the Treasure Mountain Inn in Park City, UT. As…

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Open Road Films Partners On Upcoming Productions

OPEN ROAD FILMS PARTNERS WITH CRYSTAL CITY ENTERTAINMENT AND BOUNDARY STONE FILMS FOR MULTI-YEAR DEVELOPMENT FINANCING DEAL   Los Angeles, CA – January 28, 2015 – Open Road Films and Crystal City Entertainment/Boundary Stone Films today announced a multi-picture development financing pact for all of Open Road Films’ own productions over the coming years. The…

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Bigelow-Boal Set Untitled 1967 Detroit Riot Crime Drama With Annapurna

Details about the Detroit project are not being revealed at this time.

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Santa Barbara Film Festival Names All Five Best Director Nominees As Directors Of The Year

[PR] The Santa Barbara International Film Festival announced today that Lenny Abrahamson, Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Tom McCarthy, Adam McKay and George Miller will receive the 2016 Outstanding Directors of the Year award. They will each be celebrated individually for their films ROOM, THE REVENANT, SPOTLIGHT, THE BIG SHORT and MAD MAX: FURY ROAD, respectively.  The individual…

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Universal Music Group Gets Behind Lee Daniels Apollo Theatre Doc

[PR] Oscar-nominated director Lee Daniels (LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER, PRECIOUS and creator and producer of the Fox hit series EMPIRE) will direct the documentary feature film THE APOLLO THEATER FILM PROJECT – the authorized history of New York’s famed Apollo Theater, it was announced today by White Horse Pictures’ Nigel Sinclair and Jeanne Elfant Festa….

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The Black List Announces Cassian Elwes Screenwriting Fellowships At Sundance

THE BLACK LIST ANNOUNCES THIRD ANNUAL CASSIAN ELWES INDEPENDENT SCREENWRITING FELLOWSHIPS AT THE 2016 SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL   PARK CITY, UT (January 27, 2016) – The Black List and Cassian Elwes announced that they had selected not one but two 2016 Cassian Elwes Independent Screenwriting Fellows who joined them at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival….

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Sundance Announces 2015 Short Film Awards

Park City, UT — Sundance Institute announced today the jury prizes in short filmmaking at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. The Short Film Grand Jury Prize, awarded to one film in the program of 72 short films selected from 8,712 submissions, went to Thunder Road by director and screenwriter Jim Cummings. The awards were presented…

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Sundance Institute Announces $60,000 In Sloan In Science Cinema Awards

Embrace of the Serpent by Ciro Guerra wins 2016 Alfred P. Sloan Feature Film Prize at 2016 Sundance Film Festival Park City, UT — Sundance Institute announced today awards for the most promising new independent films about science and technology, including Embrace of the Serpent directed by Ciro Guerra as the recipient of the Sloan Science-in Film-Prize at…

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Sony Pictures Classics Takes Equity At Sundance

Worldwide rights to the first female driven Wall Street film.

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SONY PICTURES TO DISTRIBUTE BLADE RUNNER INTERNATIONALLY

LOS ANGELES, CA, JANUARY 25, 2016 –Sony Pictures Releasing International will distribute Alcon Entertainment’s follow-up to Ridley Scott’s 1982 masterpiece BLADE RUNNER in all overseas territories in all media; with Warner Bros. Pictures distributing in North America and Canada through its output agreement with Alcon, it was announced by Alcon co-founders and co-CEO’s Andrew Kosove…

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American Masters Doc Theatrical Label Announced At Sundance

WNET Launches First Theatrical Imprint  American Masters Pictures   Documentaries Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You, Richard Linklater – Dream is Destiny and Maya Angelou: Still I Rise World Premiere at Sundance Film Festival (Park City, UT – January 22, 2016) Today at the Sundance Film Festival, WNET, parent company of New York’s public television stations…

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STATEMENT FROM ACADEMY PRESIDENT CHERYL BOONE ISAACS

I’d like to acknowledge the wonderful work of this year’s nominees.  While we celebrate their extraordinary achievements, I am both heartbroken and frustrated about the lack of inclusion. This is a difficult but important conversation, and it’s time for big changes. The Academy is taking dramatic steps to alter the makeup of our membership.  In the…

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Sundance Institute Launches Initiative To Support “Inventive Artistic Practice” In Nonfiction Film

Robert Greene, Margaret Brown, Omar Mullick and Bassam Tariq Selected as First ‘Art of Nonfiction’ Fellows Los Angeles, CA — Sundance Institute, one of the world’s largest grantmakers to documentary film, today announced the ‘Art of Nonfiction’ initiative, which will expand the Institute’s existing support for documentaries exploring contemporary social issues to include targeted creative…

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Slamdance 2016 Sets Juries

“We are fortunate to have such acclaimed industry members and alumni join our juries.”

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88TH OSCARS® NOMINATIONS ANNOUNCED

LOS ANGELES, CA – Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs, Guillermo del Toro, John Krasinski and Ang Lee announced the 88th Academy Awards® nominations today (January 14). Del Toro and Lee announced the nominees in 11 categories at 5:30 a.m. PT, followed by Boone Isaacs and Krasinski for the remaining 13 categories at 5:38 a.m. PT,…

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin