Press Releases Archive for August, 2015

2015 Governor’s Awards Go To Debbie Reynolds, Spike Lee, Gena Rowlands

The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted Tuesday night (August 25) to present Honorary Awards to Spike Lee and Gena Rowlands, and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award to Debbie Reynolds.  All three awards will be presented at the Academy’s 7th Annual Governors Awards on Saturday, November 14, at the…

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Full-Service Distributor FilmBuff Establishes Midtown Manhattan Headquarters, Doubles Management Team, and Expands Annual Theatrical Slate

On the heels of the recent expansion of its management team and its rapid growth in theatrical releases, FilmBuff announced a move today of its headquarters toManhattan’s burgeoning NoMad district. The move comes during a banner year for the company, which recently released the documentaries Banksy Does New York and Winning: The Racing Life of Paul…

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Fifteen 2015 Student Academy Award Winners Named

ACADEMY REVEALS 2015 STUDENT ACADEMY AWARD® WINNERS ALL WINNING FILMS NOW ELIGIBLE FOR OSCARS® LOS ANGELES, CA — The Academy has voted fifteen students as winners of the 42nd Student Academy Awardscompetition. The Academy received a record number of entries this year — 1,686 films from 282 domestic and 93 international colleges and universities — which…

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VETERAN ANIMATION EXECUTIVES PENNEY FINKELMAN COX AND SANDRA RABINS  TO LEAD ORIGINAL FORCE ANIMATION AS CHINESE STUDIO LAUNCHES LOS ANGELES PRODUCTION OFFICE

(Culver City, CA, August 13, 2015) — Original Force, one of China’s most prominent and successful digital animation studios, has launched a new motion picture division and initiated production on three animated feature films, it was announced today by Harley Zhao, President and founder of Original Force. To support the company’s expansion into Hollywood, Original Force…

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20 Scientific And Tech Achievements Vie For 2015 Oscar

The Scientific and Technical Awards Committee of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced today that 20 scientific and technical achievements, involving 11 distinct investigations, have been selected for further consideration for 2015 Academy Awards. The list is made public to allow individuals and companies with similar devices or claims of prior art…

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NYFF Adds Nonfiction, Revivals, Restorations And A New Doc By Paul Thomas Anderson

THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER ANNOUNCED TODAY SPECIAL EVENTS AND REVIVALS LINEUP FOR THE 53RD NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL Special Events include Film Comment Presents: Son of Saul; World Premiere of Paul Thomas Anderson’s Junun; 15th Anniversary screening of O Brother, Where Art Thou?; North American Premiere of De Palma Revivals highlights include new restorations…

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Ex-TIFFer Shane Smith Takes Reins Of Hot Docs Programming

Hot Docs Names Shane Smith As New Director Of Programming Hot Docs is delighted to announce that Shane Smith will join the team as the organization’s new director of programming. Shane brings years of festival experience and expertise to the position, having headed up the Canadian Film Centre’s Worldwide Short Film Festival and programmed for…

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51st Chicago Int’l Film Festival To Honor Howard Shore

(CHICAGO, August 19, 2015) – The 51st Chicago International Film Festival, presented by Cinema/Chicago, will honor acclaimed composer and orchestrator Howard Shore in recognition of his contributions to film and television with a tribute and award ceremony on Sunday, October 18, 2015. Howard Shore is one of the most versatile, talented, and respected composers and music conductors…

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NATO & UNIC Asking For Uniform Projection Aspect Ratios

Projection Aspect Ratio of DCP Features Prepared by NATO/UNIC Technology Committees Summary Exhibition is ultimately responsible for the quality of the image and sound for theatrical presentations. We have seen two major releases (Tomorrowland and Jurassic World) that were delivered in non-standard aspect ratios (2.2:1 and 2.0:1) resulting in an inferior presentation of either the…

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HBO Gets To Sesame Street In Five-Year Partnership

SESAME WORKSHOP AND HBO ANNOUNCE FIVE-YEAR PARTNERSHIP   New Seasons of Sesame Street will Premiere on HBO and Continue to be Available to PBS (New York, August 13, 2015) – Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization behind the Emmy Award-winning program Sesame Street, and HBO, the nation’s leading premium cable network, today announced a new…

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THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER ANNOUNCES MAIN SLATE SELECTIONS FOR THE 53RD NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL

26 features include the World Premiere of Steven Spielberg’s Bridge of Spies and new films from Chantal Akerman, Arnaud Desplechin, Todd Haynes, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Rebecca Miller, Michael Moore, Nanni Moretti, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Jia Zhangke, and more New York, NY (August 12, 2015) – The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced today the 26 films that…

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Santa Barbara Honors Jane Fonda with the Kirk Douglas Award for 2016

TWO-TIME ACADEMY AWARD® WINNER JANE FONDA TO RECEIVE KIRK DOUGLAS AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN FILM SANTA BARBARA, CA (August 11, 2015) – The Santa Barbara International Film Festival announced today that Jane Fonda will be honored with the tenth annual Kirk Douglas Award for Excellence in Film.  The award will be presented at a black-tie…

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Key West Film Festival “Critics Focus” Program Taps Top Critics Ann Hornaday and Eric Kohn to Curate Films; “Brett Ratner Florida Student Filmmaker Scholarship” Announced

New York, NY — The Key West Film Festival announced today a new annual Critics Focus program in which the nation’s top film critics will be invited to curate spotlight selections. This year, Ann Hornaday, Chief Film Critic of The Washington Post, and Eric Kohn, Chief Film Critic of Indiewire, will attend and host audience…

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Cheryl Boone Isaacs Reelected Academy President

Cheryl Boone Isaacs was reelected president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Tuesday night, August 4, by the organization’s Board of Governors. In addition, Jeffrey Kurland was elected first vice president; John Bailey, Kathleen Kennedy and Bill Kroyer were elected to vice president posts; Jim Gianopulos was elected treasurer; and Phil Robinson…

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Press Releases

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin