Press Releases Archive for May, 2015

SLAMDANCE LOOKS FORWARD, GROWING YEAR ROUND ENTERPRISES

Submissions open for the 2016 Film Festival, Slamdance Alumni returns for Manager Position, and programs expand through Slamdance Cinema Club, Slamdance Studios on HULU, and beyond (LOS ANGELES, CA—May 29, 2015) Following last year’s record breaking submission numbers, Slamdance Film Festival is now open for 2016 entries with a new program called DIG and the return of…

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Seth McFarlane Gets A Non-MacArthur “Genius Award”

CRITICS’ CHOICE TELEVISION AWARDS ANNOUNCES LOUIS XIII GENIUS AWARD RECIPIENT SETH MacFARLANE MAY 18, 2015 (Burbank, CA) – The Broadcast Television Journalists Association (BTJA) today announced that Seth MacFarlane, creator of long-running Emmy Award-winning TV series Family Guy and the Emmy Award-winning series Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, will receive the Critics’ Choice LOUIS XIII Genius…

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ORSON WELLES’ UNFINISHED FINAL FILM ‘THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND’ LAUNCHES INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN  

 The film to be released in 2015, the centenary year of Orson Welles birth LOS ANGELES, CA, May 7, 2015 – Forty five years after the first scenes were filmed and 30 years after his death, legendary director Orson Welles’ never-before- seen final film THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND, has launched a campaign today…

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Chicago Underground Film Fest “Bar Talks” Moderated By Ray Pride

Where Filmmakers Meet The Audience Moderated By Film Critic Ray Pride The Logan Lounge at Chicago’s Logan Theatre May 13-17, 2015 The Chicago Underground Film Festival, the world’s longest-running underground film festival, presents the fourth edition of “Bar Talks,” presented by Tribeca Flashpoint College, an informal series of talks among local and visiting filmmakers during CUFF….

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Press Releases

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“I had this friend who was my roommate for a while. She seemed really normal in every way except that she wouldn’t buy shampoo. She would only use my shampoo. And after a year it’s like, “When are you going to buy your own shampoo?” It was her way of digging in her heels. It was a certain sense of entitlement, or a certain anger. It was so interesting to me why she wouldn’t buy her own fucking shampoo. It was like,“I’m gonna use yours.” It was coming from a place of “You have more money than me, I just know it”—whether I did or I didn’t. Or maybe she felt, “You have a better life than me,” or “You have a better room than me in the apartment.” It was hostile. And she was a really close friend! There was never any other shampoo and I knew she was washing her hair. And clearly I have a thing about shampoo, as we see in ‘Friends with Money.’ I had some nice shampoo. So I found that psychologically so interesting how a person can function normally in every way and yet have this aberrance—it’s like a skip in the record. It was a sense of entitlement, I think. I put that in Olivia’s character, too, with her stealing someone’s face cream.”
Nicole Holofcener

“When books become a thing, they can no longer be fine.

“Literary people get mad at Knausgård the same way they get mad at Jonathan Franzen, a writer who, if I’m being honest, might be fine. I’m rarely honest about Jonathan Franzen. He’s an extremely annoying manI have only read bits and pieces of his novels, and while I’ve stopped reading many novels even though they were pretty good or great, I have always stopped reading Jonathan Franzen’s novels because I thought they were aggressively boring and dumb and smug. But why do I think this? I didn’t read him when he was a new interesting writer who wrote a couple of weird books and then hit it big with ‘The Corrections,’ a moment in which I might have picked him up with curiosity and read with an open mind; I only noticed him once, after David Foster Wallace had died, he became the heir apparent for the Great American Novelist position, once he had had that thing with Oprah and started giving interviews in which he said all manner of dumb shit; I only noticed him well after I had been told he was An Important Writer.

“So I can’t and shouldn’t pretend that I am unmoved by the lazily-satisfied gentle arrogance he projects or when he is given license to project it by the has-the-whole-world-gone-crazy development of him being constantly crowned and re-crowned as Is He The Great American Writer. What I really object to is this, and if there’s anything to his writing beyond it, I can’t see it and can’t be bothered. Others read him and tell me he’s actually a good writer—people whose critical instincts I have learned to respect—so I feel sure that he’s probably a perfectly fine, that his books are fine, and that probably even his stupid goddamned bird essays are probably also fine.

“But it’s too late. He has become a thing; he can’t be fine.”
~ Aaron Bady