Press Releases Archive for May, 2015

SLAMDANCE LOOKS FORWARD, GROWING YEAR ROUND ENTERPRISES

Submissions open for the 2016 Film Festival, Slamdance Alumni returns for Manager Position, and programs expand through Slamdance Cinema Club, Slamdance Studios on HULU, and beyond (LOS ANGELES, CA—May 29, 2015) Following last year’s record breaking submission numbers, Slamdance Film Festival is now open for 2016 entries with a new program called DIG and the return of…

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Seth McFarlane Gets A Non-MacArthur “Genius Award”

CRITICS’ CHOICE TELEVISION AWARDS ANNOUNCES LOUIS XIII GENIUS AWARD RECIPIENT SETH MacFARLANE MAY 18, 2015 (Burbank, CA) – The Broadcast Television Journalists Association (BTJA) today announced that Seth MacFarlane, creator of long-running Emmy Award-winning TV series Family Guy and the Emmy Award-winning series Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, will receive the Critics’ Choice LOUIS XIII Genius…

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ORSON WELLES’ UNFINISHED FINAL FILM ‘THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND’ LAUNCHES INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN  

 The film to be released in 2015, the centenary year of Orson Welles birth LOS ANGELES, CA, May 7, 2015 – Forty five years after the first scenes were filmed and 30 years after his death, legendary director Orson Welles’ never-before- seen final film THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND, has launched a campaign today…

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Chicago Underground Film Fest “Bar Talks” Moderated By Ray Pride

Where Filmmakers Meet The Audience Moderated By Film Critic Ray Pride The Logan Lounge at Chicago’s Logan Theatre May 13-17, 2015 The Chicago Underground Film Festival, the world’s longest-running underground film festival, presents the fourth edition of “Bar Talks,” presented by Tribeca Flashpoint College, an informal series of talks among local and visiting filmmakers during CUFF….

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Press Releases

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Who are the critics speaking to?
Nobody seems able to answer the question of how you can make theatre criticism more appealing, more clickworthy. One answer is to be a goddamn flamethrower every week, be a bombthrower, to write scorched-earth reviews. Just be completely hedonistic and ego-driven in your criticism, become a master stylist, and treat everything in front of you onstage as fodder for your most delicious and vicious language. That’s one road. And people may enjoy your writing. The thing that’s sacrificed is any sense of a larger responsibility, and any aesthetic consistency. I don’t think anyone is following that model right now—just being a complete jerk.

Well, Rex Reed is still writing.
Ah. Well, you can also be a standard bearer, and insist that work doesn’t measure up to your high standards. But I think the art makes the standards. I’m not going to sit there and say, “This is the way you do Shakespeare.” I believe that every play establishes its own standards, and our job is to just evaluate it. But everybody’s looking for the formula for how to talk about culture so that people who don’t have any time to read want to read about it. Is there something beyond thumbs-up, thumbs-down criticism? I would hope there’s a way to talk about a theatre event in real time—meaning while it’s still going on—in a way that’s engaging, funny, witty, and evaluates the elements of the thing. But it’s like if you had a friend who was like, “Gee, are you working out? You look great. But that’s a terrible haircut.” Nobody wants that person around.
~ Time Out’s 17-Year Theatre Critic, David Cote, Upon His Exit

“Now I am awake to the world. I was asleep before. When they slaughtered Congress, we didn’t wake up. When they blamed terrorists and suspended the Constitution, we didn’t wake up either. They said it would be temporary. Nothing changes instantaneously. In a gradually heating bathtub you’d be boiled to death before you knew it.”
“The Handmaid’s Tale,” Bruce Miller