Press Releases Archive for April, 2013

SIFF ANNOUNCES FULL LINEUP FOR 39th SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

447 Films/ 85 Countries.

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WOODY ALLEN’S NEW COMEDY TO STAR COLIN FIRTH & EMMA STONE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  NEW YORK (April 30, 2013) – Woody Allen’s new, untitled comedy will star Colin Firth and Emma Stone. The Gravier Productions film is produced by Allen’s longtime associates, Letty Aronson and Stephen Tenenbaum. Set in the South of France, Allen will shoot the film this summer, once again collaborating with cinematographer Darius…

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2013 TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES AWARDS

THE ROCKET, THE KILL TEAM, WHITEWASH AND OXYANA WIN TOP AWARDS IN JURIED WORLD COMPETITIONS * * * SANDY STORYLINES WINS FIRST-EVER BOMBAY SAPPHIRE AWARD FOR TRANSMEDIA * * * FESTIVAL AWARDS $155,000 IN CASH PRIZES [April 25, 2013 – New York, NY] – The 12th annual Tribeca Film Festival, co-founded by Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal and Craig Hatkoff, and presented by founding…

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SUNDANCE SELECTS AND IFC FILMS NAMES SHANI ANKORI HEAD OF MARKETING AND LAUREN SCHWARTZ HEAD OF PUBLICITY

MICHAEL WINTON NAMED HEAD OF MARKETING AND PUBLICITY FOR IFC MIDNIGHT New York, NY – April 24, 2013 – Jonathan Sehring, President of Sundance Selects/IFC Films announced today that Lauren Schwartz will head film publicity and Shani Ankori will head marketing for the company’s distribution labels, Sundance Selects and IFC Films. In their expanded roles, Schwartz…

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THREE-TIME ACADEMY AWARD WINNER OLIVER STONE TO ATTEND KARLOVY VARY INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Festival will award the Director, Producer and Screenwriter with the Crystal Globe for Outstanding Artistic Contribution to World Cinema 23 April 2013, London, UK: The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (KVIFF) today announced that the 2013 recipient of its most prestigious award, the Crystal Globe, will be legendary filmmaker Oliver Stone.  Stone…

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Cannes Sets 2013 Directors Fortnight

Includes Bozon, Barnard, Nadjari, Folman, Jodorowsky, Ophüls, And A Short By Lynne Ramsay

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MATTHEW McCONAUGHEY, JARED LETO, JENNIFER GARNER STAR IN JEAN-MARC VALLÉE’S DALLAS BUYERS CLUB, TO BE RELEASED BY FOCUS FEATURES DOMESTICALLY

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE NEW YORK, April 23, 2013 – Dallas Buyers Club, currently in post-production, has been acquired by Focus Features for domestic theatrical release in the second half of 2013. The company has also acquired Latin American rights to the feature. Focus CEO James Schamus and Focus president Andrew Karpen made the announcement today….

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THE AMERICAN PAVILION ANNOUNCES HISTORIC REDESIGN DETAILS TIMED TO 25 ANNIVERSARY

DESIGN INCORPORATES SOPHISTICATED DESIGN ELEMENTS THANKS TO PRESENTING SPONSOR THE PENINSULA HOTEL GROUP

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Cannes 2013: Official Selection and Un Certain Regard

  IN COMPETITION Opening Film Baz LUHRMANN THE GREAT GATSBY (H.C.) 2h22 *** Valeria BRUNI-TEDESCHI UN CHÂTEAU EN ITALIE 1h44 Ethan COEN, Joel COEN INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS 1h45 Arnaud des PALLIÈRES MICHAEL KOHLHAAS 2h05 Arnaud DESPLECHIN JIMMY P. (PSYCHOTHERAPY OF A PLAINS INDIAN) 2h Amat ESCALANTE HELI 1h45 Asghar FARHADI LE PASSÉ (THE PAST) 2h10 James…

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BRITNEY SPEARS TO RELEASE NEW SONG “OOH LA LA” FOR COLUMBIA PICTURES/SONY PICTURES ANIMATION’S FAMILY COMEDY “THE SMURFS™ 2”

 CULVER CITY, Calif., April 17, 2013 – Pop icon Britney Spears will release a song for Columbia Pictures/Sony Pictures Animation’s highly anticipated family comedy The Smurfs™ 2, entitled “Ooh La La,” via Kemosabe / RCA Records. “Ooh La La,” which will play at the end credits of the film, was written by Lukasz Gottwald (Dr. Luke), Joshua…

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CRAIG ZADAN AND NEIL MERON RETURN TO PRODUCE THE OSCARS®

The acclaimed motion picture, television and theater producing team of Craig Zadan and Neil Meron will return.

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International Documentary Association’s New Screening Series To Replace DocuWeeks Qualifying Showcase

LOS ANGELES, April 11, 2013 — The International Documentary Association announced today the launch of the IDA Documentary Screening Series, invitation-only screenings of fifteen documentary features to take place annually between September and January.  The new series will replace IDA’s DocuWeeks™ Theatrical Documentary Showcase, a program designed to help filmmakers qualify their works for Oscar®…

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JURIES ANNOUNCED FOR 2013 TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL AND TRIBECA FILM INSTITUTE PROGRAMS

For Immediate Release  Bryce Dallas-Howard, Whoopi Goldberg, Paul Haggis, Taraji P. Henson, Riley Keough, Kenny Lonergan, Eva Longoria, Sheila Nevins, Josh Radnor and Evan Rachel Wood among the jurors this year New York, NY – April 10, 2013 – The Tribeca Film Festival (TFF), presented by founding partner American Express, today announced its jurors – a diverse…

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THE ACADEMY ANNOUNCES NAMING OF THE DAVID GEFFEN THEATER

THE DAVID GEFFEN FOUNDATION DONATES $25 MILLION TO THE ACADEMY MUSEUM OF MOTION PICTURES

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Full Frame Documentary Film Festival Announces 2013 Award Winners

Award Winners were announced this afternoon at the annual Awards Barbecue.

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Statement from TIFF on the passing of Roger Ebert

April 4, 2013 We are terribly saddened by the news of the passing of our friend Roger Ebert. More than a friend, Roger was family. He knew us from our humble beginnings, stuck by us, and helped us grow, as only family can do. It is no exaggeration to say that Roger, through his championing,…

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GENE SISKEL FILM CENTER OFFICIAL STATEMENT REGARDING THE PASSING OF ROGER EBERT

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 4, 2013 Chicago—The Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago grieves with the Ebert family, Chicago, and film buffs everywhere on the passing of the beloved Pulitzer Prize-winning Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert. Barbara Scharres, the Film Center’s Director of Programming for 37 years, has…

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William Friedkin’s SORCERER added to Chicago Critics Film Festival)

A rare screening of William Friedkin’s “Sorcerer.”

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Press Releases

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin