Press Releases Archive for February, 2013

TELLURIDE FILM FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES ITS 40th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

New 650 Seat Werner Herzog Theatre to be Complete for 2013 Edition

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Patio Theater and Chicago Cinema Society Announce Partnership

The newly re-opened and beautifully restored Patio Theater and The Chicago Cinema Society are very proud to announce their new partnership, which will bring unique independent film programming to the Patio. In addition to the Patio’s standard Hollywood programming, Chicago Cinema Society will be presenting features outside the Patio’s normal schedule, with Friday and Saturday…

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VES OPEN LETTER – CALL TO ACTION

In light of current events, the Visual Effects Society issues two calls to action.

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EXCLUSIVE MEDIA TO REPRESENT ICON ENTERTAINMENT INTERNATIONAL’S LIBRARY

MEAN STREETS, PROJECT NIM, WHAT WOMEN WANT

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85th Academy Awards: Winners

Best Picture: Argo Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln Actress: Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook Supporting Actor: Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained Supporting Actress: Anne Hathaway, Les Miserables Directing: Ang Lee, Life of Pi Foreign Language Film: Amour Adapted Screenplay: Chris Terrio, Argo Original Screenplay: Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained Animated Feature Film: Brave Production Design: Lincoln Cinematography: Life…

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THE OSCARS AVAILABLE IN ITS ENTIRETY VIA ABC’S FULL EPISODE PLAYER, HULU AND HULU PLUS FOR A LIMITED TIME BEGINNING MONDAY

February 24, 2013 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   THE OSCARS® SHOW TO BE AVAILABLE IN ITS ENTIRETY VIA ABC’S FULL EPISODE PLAYER, HULU AND HULU PLUS FOR A LIMITED TIME BEGINNING MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25TH   THE FULL SHOW ALSO AVAILABLE VIA ABC ON DEMAND   BEVERLY HILLS, CA – For the first time, viewers in the…

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Quvenzhané Wallis Is ANNIE

QUVENZHANÉ WALLIS TO PLAY ANNIE FOR OVERBROOK ENTERTAINMENT, MARCY MEDIA AND SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT   CULVER CITY, Calif., February 24, 2013 – Overbrook Entertainment, Marcy Media, director Will Gluck and Sony Pictures Entertainment have cast Academy Award® nominee Quvenzhané Wallis, the star of Beasts of the Southern Wild, in the title role of Annie, it was…

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2012 Independent Spirit Awards

BEST FEATURE Silver Linings Playbook BEST DIRECTOR David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook BEST SCREENPLAY Silver Linings Playbook BEST FIRST FEATURE The Perks of Being a Wallflower BEST FIRST SCREENPLAY Safety Not Guaranteed JOHN CASSAVETES AWARD (Best feature made for under $500,000) Middle of Nowhere BEST FEMALE LEAD Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook BEST MALE LEAD John Hawkes,…

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2013 Ridenhour Documentary Film Prize Goes To The Invisible War

For Immediate Release New York, NY (February 22, 2013): The Fertel Foundation and The Nation Institute today announced the recipient of the 2013 Ridenhour Documentary Film Prize, which is presented to a documentary for illuminating an underreported subject, or raising awareness around an issue of social importance. The film prize is one of four Ridenhour prizes,…

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The Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center announce lineup for the 42nd Annual New Directors/New Films

PRESS RELEASE Alexandre Moors’ BLUE CAPRICE is the Opening Night presentation with Penny Lane’s OUR NIXON slated for the Closing Night slot New York, NY, February 22, 2013—The Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center announced the full lineup today for the 42nd edition of New Directors/New Films (March 20 –…

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Hollywood icons celebrate the Irish in Film: J.J. Abrams, Steven Speilberg and Warren Beatty on hand for the US-Ireland Alliance awards ceremony

For Immediate Release February 21, 2013  Colin Farrell, Lionsgate Vice Chairman Michael Burns, and Academy Award winning makeup artist, Michele Burke, were honored at the US-Ireland Alliance’s annual “Oscar Wilde: Honoring the Irish in Film.” J.J. Abrams welcomed guests to Bad Robot, Abrams’ production company in Santa Monica. Major sponsors were American Airlines and Accenture….

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STATEMENT FROM OSCAR®-NOMINATED CO-DIRECTOR OF 5 BROKEN CAMERAS

Los Angeles, CA – February 20, 2013 – “Last night, on my way from Turkey to Los Angeles, CA, my family and I were held at US immigration for about an hour and questioned about the purpose of my visit to the United States. Immigration officials asked for proof that I was nominated for an Academy Award® for…

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CHARLIE BRAVO O-SCOPE Oscilloscope Brings On Charlie Olsky As Head Of Publicity

(New York, NY) February 20th, 2013—Oscilloscope Laboratories announced today that it has hired Charlie Olsky as their new Head of Publicity.  Olsky, who comes off of four and a half years at Susan Norget Film Promotion, will oversee publicity on all current and future O-Scope releases and will report directly to O-Scope heads Dan Berger…

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CBS FILMS ACQUIRES THE COEN BROTHERS’ ‘INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS’

The film stars Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan, John Goodman, Garrett Hedlund, F. Murray Abraham and Justin Timberlake.

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2013 WRITERS GUILD AWARDS WINNERS ANNOUNCED

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE February 17, 2013 Los Angeles and New York – The Writers Guild of America, West (WGAW) and the Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE) tonight announced the winners of the 2013 Writers Guild Awards for outstanding achievement in writing for screen, television, radio, news, promotional, videogame, and new media writing at simultaneous…

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“ARGO,” “THE SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK” AND “BRAVE” WIN BIG AT THE 63RD ANNUAL ACE EDDIE AWARDS RECOGNIZING OUTSTANDING EDITING IN 2012

  “BREAKING BAD,” “NURSE JACKIE” AND “THE NEWSROOM” TOP TELEVISION WINNERS   “SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN” TAKES FILM DOC PRIZE AND IN A BRAND NEW CATEGORY THIS YEAR “AMERICAN MASTERS – PHIL OCHS: THERE BUT FOR FORTUNE” WINS BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (TELEVISION)   STEVEN SPIELBERG, RICHARD MARKS, A.C.E. AND LARRY SILK, A.C.E. RECEIVE SPECIAL HONORS…

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OSCILLOSCOPE EXPLORES LIFE AFTER TILLER

Acclaimed Doc Set For Awards Qualifying and Theatrical Release (New York, NY) February 15, 2013—Oscilloscope Laboratories announced today that it has acquired North American rights to Martha Shane’s and Lana Wilson’s directorial debut AFTER TILLER. The film premiered last month at the Sundance Film Festival to universal acclaim. It is scheduled to screen next at…

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IFC FILMS TAKES NORTH AMERICAN RIGHTS TO DIRECTOR PAUL SCHRADER’S THE CANYONS

Bret Easton Ellis-Penned Film Starring Lindsay Lohan and James Deen To Have Early Summer Day-and-Date Release

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Workshop On Special Effects Make Up And Mouldes And Prostetics For Cinema

If you are interested in taking advantage of this amazing workshop, we advise fast registration, as 2 months away we are already more than 60% full This will be an amazing opportunity for everyone wanting to develop their skills in special effects make up and mouldes and prostetics for cinema, or just getting insight on…

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WRITERS GUILD EAST ANNOUNCES TRIBUTE TO NORA EPHRON AT 2013 AWARDS CEREMONY

AUTHOR MEG WOLITZER LEADS TRIBUTE TO AWARD-WINNING WRITER AND DIRECTOR.

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Press Releases

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin