Press Releases Archive for July, 2012

HAWK KOCH ELECTED ACADEMY PRESIDENT

July 31, 2012 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Beverly Hills, CA – Producer Hawk Koch was elected president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences tonight (July 31) by the organization’s Board of Governors. This will be his first term in the office. Koch, who is beginning his ninth year as a governor representing the…

Read the full article »

Steve James’ HEAD GAMES Set for September 21 Theatrical Release Through Variance Films

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Award-winning filmmaker tackles hot-button issue of concussions in sport New York, July 31, 2012 – Variance Films announced today that it has acquired theatrical rights to HEAD GAMES, the new documentary feature from acclaimed director Steve James (“Hoop Dreams,” The Interrupters”) that takes a nuanced, intelligent look at the concussion crisis in American sports. …

Read the full article »

MASSIVE E-BOOK GIVEAWAY FOR THE INTOUCHABLES MOVIEGOERS

YOU CHANGED MY LIFE: A MEMOIR GIVES FIRST HAND ACCOUNT OF TRUE STORY THAT INSPIRED THE WORLDWIDE RECORD-BREAKING COMEDY New York, NY – July 26, 2012 – The Weinstein Company (TWC) and Weinstein Books announced today that they, along with partners Amazon, Apple, B&N.com, and Sony, plan to give away free eBook copies of You…

Read the full article » 4 Comments »

Academy Sets Campaign Rules For 85th Academy Awards

July 25, 2012 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Beverly Hills, CA– The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has updated regulations for how companies and individuals may market movies and achievements eligible for the 85th Academy Awards® to Academy members. The changes pertain to screenings that feature live filmmaker participation, the…

Read the full article »

TRIBECA FILM ACQUIRES NORTH AMERICAN RIGHTS TO SOMEBODY UP THERE LIKES ME

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Spring 2013 theatrical release set for Bob Byington’s offbeat SXSW comedy starring Keith Poulson, Nick Offerman and Jess Weixler New York, NY – July 25, 2012 – Tribeca Film today announced it has acquired all North American rights to indie director Bob Byington’s deadpan comedy Somebody Up There Likes Me, starring Keith…

Read the full article »

2012 TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL UNVEILS GALAS AND SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS

July 24, 2012 NEWS RELEASE. Toronto – Piers Handling, CEO and Director of TIFF, and Cameron Bailey, Artistic Director of the Toronto International Film Festival, made the first announcement of films to premiere at the 37th Toronto International Film Festival. Films announced include titles in the Galas and Special Presentations programmes. The announced films include 17…

Read the full article »

NATO Letter on Fund for Aurora

July 24, 2012 Dear Exhibition Colleagues, The tragic events that occurred in Aurora, Colorado have been devastating to the victims, their families and loved ones, the community, the state and the nation. As we watch the aftermath unfold and try to make sense of this terrible crime, you should be encouraged by the leadership and…

Read the full article »

EVOLUTION INDEPENDENT, LAGNIAPPE AND PARADOX ENTERTAINMENT PARTNER TO FINANCE AIN’T THEM BODIES SAINTS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  Principal Photography Began July 9 in Louisiana Los Angeles, CA (July 23, 2012) – Evolution Independent, Lagniappe and Paradox Entertainment announce today that principal photography has begun on the new dramatic thriller AIN’T THEM BODIES SAINTS, which was written and is being directed by David Lowery (“Pioneer”) and stars Academy Award-nominees Rooney Mara (“The…

Read the full article »

Oscar®-winning Screenwriter Frank Pierson: Statement from Pierson Family

July 23, 2012 Oscar-winning screenwriter Frank Pierson died today in Los Angeles of natural causes following a short illness.  He was 87. A three-time Academy Award® nominee, Pierson won an Oscar for his original screenplay of “Dog Day Afternoon.” He received nominations for “Cat Ballou” and “Cool Hand Luke.” Pierson’s writing credits also include “Presumed…

Read the full article »

Updated: AMC Theatres Statement Regarding the Tragedy in Aurora, Colorado

KANSAS CITY, Mo. The following is a statement by AMC Theatres: AMC Theatres is deeply saddened by the Aurora tragedy. Movie going is part of our social fabric and this senseless act shakes us to our core. We’re reinforcing our security procedures with our theatre teams, which we cannot discuss in detail for obvious, safety reasons….

Read the full article »

UPDATED: AMC Theatres Statement Regarding the Tragedy in Aurora, Colorado

Kansas City, Mo. (July 21, 2012, 2 p.m. CDT) – AMC Theatres is deeply saddened by the Aurora tragedy. Movie going is part of our social fabric and this senseless act shakes us to our core. We’re reinforcing our security procedures with our theatre teams, which we cannot discuss in detail for obvious, safety reasons….

Read the full article »

AMC Theatres Statement Regarding The Tragedy In Aurora, Colorado (8:51am)

Kansas City, Mo. (July 21, 2012) – We are terribly saddened by the random act of violence in Aurora and our thoughts are with the victims and their families. For the safety and security of our guests and associates, we are actively working with local law enforcement in communities throughout the nation and under the…

Read the full article »

Relativity Taps Breck Eisner to Helm Stretch Armstrong

Targeted for April 11, 2014 Release (Beverly Hills, Calif.) July 19, 2012 – Relativity Media has closed a deal with Breck Eisner (The Crazies, Sahara)to direct its upcoming live-action film based on Stretch Armstrong, it was announced today by Relativity’s President, Tucker Tooley. Relativity partnered with global branded play company Hasbro, Inc. [NASDAQ-HAS] to develop…

Read the full article »

WARNER BROS. TECHNICAL OPERATIONS LAUNCHES OUTMYWINDOW, A PRIVATE PHOTO SHARING SERVICE

ALL-IN-ONE CAMERA APP AND WEB SERVICE THAT GIVES CONSUMERS A MORE PERSONAL WAY TO SHARE AND SAVE THEIR PHOTOS  BURBANK, CALIF., July 19, 2012 – Warner Bros. Technical Operations today launched outmywindow(TM) (www.outmywindow.com), a new all-in-one private photo sharing and storage service that gives consumers complete control over their photos and who views them.  outmywindow allows consumers…

Read the full article »

STANDOUT DOC BROOKLYN CASTLE TO RECEIVE FALL 2012 RELEASE FROM PRODUCERS DISTRIBUTION AGENCY

For Immediate Release // July 19, 2012 NEW YORK – Producers Distribution Agency, the distribution initiative created by Cinetic Media’s John Sloss and Bart Walker, announced today the upcoming theatrical release of BROOKLYN CASTLE.  The film will be the fourth PDA release, following the commercially successful and critically acclaimed national theatrical campaigns of SENNA, THE…

Read the full article »

Cassian Elwes Takes North American Rights to Syrian Director Sam Kadi’s ‘The Citizen’

For Immediate Release: Veteran Sales Agent Presents Syrian Filmmaker’s First Feature to Distributors in Toronto Los Angeles, CA (July 19, 2012) –  3K Pictures announces today that veteran sales agent Cassian Elwes is handling all North American rights to director Sam Kadi’s debut political drama THE CITIZEN. The film was produced by Kadi, Chris Wyatt (NAPOLEON…

Read the full article »

Filmmaker Magazine Announces 2012 “25 New Faces of Independent Film”

For immediate release Speaking to the collaborative spirit and self-sufficiencies of today’s filmmakers, a record 37 people comprise Filmmaker Magazine’s 2012 “25 New Faces of Independent Film.” Several filmmaking teams and one sprawling collective all occupy slots on the list, the 15th edition of Filmmaker‘s annual survey of up-and-coming directors, screenwriters, actors, producers and cinematographers….

Read the full article »

WARNER BROS. TECHNICAL OPERATIONS LAUNCHES OUTMYWINDOW(TM) A PRIVATE PHOTO SHARING SERVICE

ALL-IN-ONE CAMERA APP AND WEB SERVICE THAT GIVES CONSUMERS A MORE PERSONAL WAY TO SHARE AND SAVE THEIR PHOTOS BURBANK, CALIF., July 19, 2012 – Warner Bros. Technical Operations today launched outmywindow(TM) (www.outmywindow.com), a new all-in-one private photo sharing and storage service that gives consumers complete control over their photos and who views them. outmywindow…

Read the full article »

IFC FILMS TAKES U.S. RIGHTS TO ERAN CREEVY’S WELCOME TO THE PUNCH

FILM STARS JAMES MCAVOY, MARK STRONG AND ANDREA RISEBOROUGH New York, NY (July 18, 2012) – IFC Films announced today the company is acquiring all U.S. rights to director Eran Creevy’s action thriller WELCOME TO THE PUNCH from Worldview Entertainment. The film, which was also written by Creevy, stars James McAvoy, Mark Strong, and Andrea Riseborough. The project…

Read the full article »

ICARUS FILMS acquires distribution rights to the dGENERATE FILMS collection

July 17, 2012                                                                                 For Immediate Release Jonathan Miller, President of Icarus Films, and Karin Chien,…

Read the full article »

Press Releases

Quote Unquotesee all »

This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin