Press Releases Archive for January, 2012

The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces 12th Edition of FILM COMMENT SELECTS, February 17-March 1

PRESS RELEASE New York, NY, January 31,—The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced the schedule for the 12th edition of FILM COMMENT SELECTS (February 17-March 1), Film Comment magazine’s essential and eclectic film festival. Featuring a handpicked lineup of films that are alternately previewing prior to their theatrical runs or quite possibly never coming back to…

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LIONSGATE ENTERS WITNESS PROTECTION WITH TYLER PERRY

Eugene Levy, Doris Roberts, Tom Arnold, Denise Richards, John Amos, Marla Gibbs And Romeo Star In Next Installment Of Tyler Perry’s Beloved Madea Franchise SANTA MONICA, Calif., Jan. 30, 2011—LIONSGATE® (NYSE: LGF), a leading global entertainment company, together with Tyler Perry, today announced the commencement of production of MADEA’S WITNESS PROTECTION.  The film marks the prolific filmmaker and…

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Screen Actors Guild Honors Outstanding Film And Television Performances at the 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE LOS ANGELES (Jan. 29, 2012) – Screen Actors Guild presented its coveted Actor statuette for the outstanding motion picture and primetime television performances of 2011 at the “18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards” in ceremonies attended by film and television’s leading actors, held Sunday, Jan. 29, at the Los Angeles Shrine Exposition…

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2012 SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES AWARDS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 28, 2012 The House I Live In, Beasts of the Southern Wild, The Law in These Parts and Violeta Went to Heaven Earn Grand Jury Prizes Audience Favorites Include The Invisible War, The Surrogate, SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN and Valley of Saints Sleepwalk With Me Receives Best of NEXT <=> Audience…

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Eulogy For Bingham Ray, By Ben Barenholtz, Eamonn Bowles, Tom Prassis, Arnie Sawyer

(As read by John Cooper at the Sundance 2012 award ceremony.) We are here to mourn, and honor, an icon of the film industry.  And as we begin we can hear his voice whispering in our ears, “Don’t fuck it up, Kitty Kats!”  Followed by a huge roar of sarcastic laughter. This was Bingham Ray…

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Statement from SAG National President Ken Howard Regarding the AFTRA National Board Vote

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE LOS ANGELES (January 28, 2012) — Screen Actors Guild National President Ken Howard released the following statement regarding the AFTRA National Board vote on the proposed merger with Screen Actors Guild: “This is a terrific outcome and I offer my sincere thanks and congratulations to AFTRA’s National Board  and National President Roberta…

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Screen Actors Guild National Board of Directors Approves Merger Package with AFTRA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE LOS ANGELES (January 27, 2012) – The Screen Actors Guild National Board of Directors today voted overwhelmingly to approve and recommend a plan to merge with AFTRA. The board met in a regularly scheduled plenary meeting in the James Cagney Board Room at the Guild’s Los Angeles headquarters and voted after reviewing…

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PRODUCER CREDITS DETERMINED FOR 2011 BEST PICTURE NOMINEE TREE OF LIFe

January 27, 2012 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Beverly Hills, CA – Producer credits for 84th Academy Awards® Best Picture nominee “The Tree of Life” have been determined by the Producers Branch Executive Committee of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The official nominees for the film are Sarah Green, Bill Pohlad, Dede Gardner and…

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JENS ASSUR WINS 2012 SUNDANCE/NHK INTERNATIONAL FILMMAKER AWARD

MEDIA ALERT WHAT: Sundance Institute and NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) have announced Jens Assur, director of the upcoming film, Close Far Away, as winner of the 2012 Sundance/NHK International Filmmaker Award. Created in 1996 to celebrate 100 years of cinema, the annual award recognizes and supports a visionary filmmaker on his or her next film….

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IFC FILMS TAKES NORTH AMERICAN RIGHTS TO ANTONIO CAMPOS’ SIMON KILLER

Park City, UT (January 27, 2012) – IFC Films announced today from the 2012 Sundance Film Festival that the company is acquiring North American rights to director Antonio Campos’ SIMON KILLER. The film, with a screenplay also by Campos, stars Brady Corbet, Mati Diop, Michael Abiteboul, Constance Rousseau, and Lila Salet. The picture wasproduced by Josh…

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AUDIENCE AND JURY PRIZES ANNOUNCED FOR 2012 SLAMDANCE FILM FESTIVAL

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 26, 2012 PARK CITY – January 26, 2012, The 18th Annual Slamdance Film Festival tonight announced the feature film and short film recipients of this year’s awards in the Audience, Grand Jury, and Sponsored Award categories. The award winners were announced at the annual Closing Night Awards Ceremony at the Treasure…

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DRAFTHOUSE FILMS’ “BULLHEAD” OPENS FEBRUARY 17 IN LIMITED RELEASE

****FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE**** BULLHEAD is Nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Foreign Language Film Category Los Angeles, CA – Friday, January 27, 2012 – Drafthouse Films announces that Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award-nominee BULLHEAD will open Friday, February 17 in New York, Los Angeles and Austin in the following theaters and will expand to…

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SUNDANCE SELECTS TAKES NORTH AMERICAN RIGHTS TO DAVID FRANCE’S HOW TO SURVIVE A PLAGUE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Park City, UT (January 26, 2012) – Sundance Selects announced today from the 2012 Sundance Film Festival that the company is acquiring North American rights to David France’s documentary HOW TO SURVIVE A PLAGUE. The film, with a screenplay by France, T. Woody Richman, and Tyler H. Walk, wasproduced by France and…

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DVD, Blu-ray, and Television Launches of Award-Winning Chicago Documentary The Interrupters

Star Ameena Matthews to appear on The Colbert Report Kartemquin Films has produced independent documentary films in Chicago since 1966. We’re pleased to announce the February 14th DVD, Blu-ray and US television premieres of our film The Interrupters, the Chicago Film Critics Association’s “Best Documentary of 2011.” PBS will release the DVD and Blu-ray editions of The Interrupters on…

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IFC MIDNIGHT TAKES NORTH AMERICAN RIGHTS TO WRITER-DIRECTOR NICHOLAS McCARTHY’S THE PACT

Park City, UT (January 26, 2012) – IFC Midnight announced today from the 2012 SundanceFilm Festival that the company is acquiring North American rights, to writer-director Nicholas McCarthy’s THE PACT. The film, which premiered in the festival’s Midnight section on January 20, stars Caity Lotz, Casper Van Dien, Haley Hudson, Kathleen Rose Perkins, Sam Ball, and Agnes Bruckner.  The…

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ACADEMY PARTNERS WITH EVERYONE COUNTS ELECTRONIC VOTING SYSTEM TO LAUNCH FOR 2013 OSCARS

January 25, 2012 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Beverly Hills, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has entered into an agreement with Everyone Counts Inc. to exclusively develop an electronic voting system for the 85th Academy Awards®, to be held in 2013. Everyone Counts will work with PwC, the Academy’s accounting firm of…

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FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES ACQUIRES “BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD”

For Immediate Release Specialty Arm Acquires U. S. Rights PARK CITY, UT January 24, 2012 – Fox Searchlight Pictures Presidents Stephen Gilula and Nancy Utley announced today that the company has acquired U. S. rights to the fantastical drama BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD. Directed by Benh Zeitlin  and written by Lucy Alibar and Zeitlin,…

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FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES ACQUIRES “THE SURROGATE”

For Immediate Release Specialty Arm Acquires Worldwide Rights PARK CITY, UT January 24, 2012 – Fox Searchlight Pictures Presidents Nancy Utley and Stephen Gilula announced today that the company has acquired worldwide rights to the inspirational true story THE SURROGATE. Directed and written by Ben Lewin, THE SURROGATE stars John Hawkes as Mark O’Brien, Helen…

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Millennium Entertainment Stops for RED LIGHTS, Rodrigo Cortés’ Paranormal Thriller

Los Angeles (January 24, 2012) – Millennium Entertainment’s CEO Bill Lee announced today that the company has acquired North American rights to Sundance thriller RED LIGHTS, featuring an all-star cast led by Cillian Murphy, Sigourney Weaver, Robert De Niro, Toby Jones, Joely Richardson, Elizabeth Olsen, Craig Roberts, Leonardo Sbaraglia and Adriane Lenox.  Written and directed…

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SUNDANCE INSTITUTE | MAHINDRA GLOBAL FILMMAKING AWARD RECIPIENTS ANNOUNCED

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 24, 2012 Emerging Artists from South Africa, Australia, Chile and India Selected for their Visionary Projects PARK CITY, UT — Sundance Institute and Mahindra today announced the winners of the 2012 Sundance Institute | Mahindra Global Filmmaking Award, in recognition and support of emerging independent filmmakers from around the world. The…

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin