Press Releases Archive for December, 2010

COURTNEY OTT JOINS THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE VICE PRESIDENT OF PUBLICITY AT IFC ANNOUNCED AS FSLC’S DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND PR NEW YORK – December 29, 2010 – The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced today that Courtney Ott will join the organization as the Director of Marketing and PR. Ott will head a PR and Marketing team charged with working…

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Oxford Film Festival Announces 2011 Lineup

2011 Oxford Film Festival announces Lineup December 28, 2010 Oxford, MS —The Oxford Film Festival and Thacker Mountain Radio – two of Oxford’s arts and entertainment traditions – have teamed up to celebrate a weekend of movies with an opening night extravaganza on Thursday, Feb. 10 at the Lyric Theatre. The Oxford Film Festival is…

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2010 National Film Registry

2010 National Film Registry (the full press release) December 28, 2010 Hollywood Blockbusters, Independent Films and Shorts Selected for Preservation in the 2010 National Film Registry “All the President’s Men,” “The Exorcist,” and George Lucas’ Student Film Among Picks Films Selected to the 2010 National Film Registry 1. Airplane (1980) 2. All the President’s Men…

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2011 SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL ADDS KENTIS-LAU SILENT HOUSE TO LINE UP

For Immediate Release PARK CITY, UT, December 28, 2010—Sundance Institute announced today that filmmakers Chris Kentis and Laura Lau (Open Water) will return to the Sundance Film Festival  with their latest feature, Silent House, which will have its world premiere in the out-of-competition Park City at Midnight section. The Sundance Film Festival runs January 20-30, 2011 in…

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IFC FILMS ACQUIRES RIGHTS TO DON ROOS’ THE OTHER WOMAN FROM INCENTIVE FILMED ENTERTAINMENT

ROR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Film Stars Natalie Portman and Lisa Kudrow New York, NY (December 28, 2010) – IFC Films, the leading American distributor of independent and foreign films, announced today that the company is acquiring the rights to director Don Roos’ frank, funny and heart-wrenching drama THE OTHER WOMAN.  Produced by Marc Platt (NINE, WANTED)…

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OSCAR® NOMINATION BALLOTS MAILED TO 5,755 ACADEMY VOTERS

December 27, 2010 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Beverly Hills, CA – Nomination ballots for the 83rd Academy Awards® were mailed today to the 5,755 voting members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Completed ballots must be returned to PricewaterhouseCoopers by 5 p.m. PT on Friday, January 14, 2011. Ballots received after the deadline…

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248 FEATURE FILMS ELIGIBLE FOR BEST PICTURE OSCAR®

December 20, 2010 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Beverly Hills, CA – Two hundred forty-eight feature films are eligible for the 2010 Academy Award® for Best Picture, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced today. To be eligible for 83rd Academy Awards® consideration, feature films must open in a commercial motion picture theater in Los…

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MIRAMAX ANNOUNCES PARTNERSHIP WITH THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY TO PRODUCE SEQUELS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE SANTA MONICA and LOS ANGELES (December 16, 2010) –Miramax and The Weinstein Company (TWC) today announced an agreement to create sequels to some of Miramax’s best-known properties and to partner on potential new television shows and special edition home entertainment products. The first films to be produced under the agreement will be…

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SUNDANCE INSTITUTE ANNOUNCES 12 FEATURE FILM PROJECTS FOR

For Immediate Release December 15, 2010 Los Angeles, CA—Sundance Institute has selected twelve projects for the annual January Screenwriters Lab, to be held January 14-19, 2011 at the Sundance Resort in Utah.  This year’s group includes filmmakers from regions throughout the world, including the United States, Mexico, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and Europe.  A hallmark…

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41 Original Songs Queue for 2010 Oscar®

Beverly Hills, CA (December 15, 2010) – Forty-one songs from eligible feature-length motion pictures are in contention for nominations in the Original Song category for the 83rd Academy Awards®, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced today. The original songs, along with the motion picture in which each song is featured, are listed…

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THE FOUNDATION FOR JEWISH CULTURE ANNOUNCES 2010 RECIPIENTS OF THE LYNN AND JULES KROLL FUND FOR JEWISH DOCUMENTARY FILM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE NEW YORK – December 15, 2010 – The Foundation for Jewish Culture granted $140,000 to five exemplary documentaries, ensuring their delivery to film festivals, television, and other distribution outlets. The grants, which range between $20,000 and $35,000 each, will enable filmmakers to pay license fees for archival footage, complete additional shooting, and…

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Sundance Film Festival Adds 3 More

PARK CITY, UT – Sundance Institute announced today that three additional feature films will world premiere in the out-of-competition Premieres and new Documentary Premieres sections of the 2011 Sundance Film Festival: The Future (Director and screenwriter: Miranda July); Flypaper (Director: Rob Minkoff), and Magic Trip (Directors: Alison Ellwood and Alex Gibney). In addition, The Future…

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VOTING OPENS FOR THE 2011 CINEMA EYE HONORS AUDIENCE CHOICE PRIZE

January 13, 2010 – Voting for the 4th Annual Cinema Eye Honors Audience Choice prize opened today, with ten nonfiction feature films nominated and voting open to the public at large.  Voting – which takes place on the Cinema Eye website – will remain for one month, with the winner announced on January 18, 2011…

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IFC MIDNIGHT ACQUIRES THRILLER “X” FROM CELLULOID NIGHTMARES

Los Angeles, CA (December 14, 2010) – IFC Midnight, the genre label of IFC Films, announced today that the company has acquired the U.S. rights to Jon Hewitt’s genre thriller “X” from Celluloid Nightmares following the recently-wrapped American Film Market. The film, which is currently in post-production, was written by Hewitt and Belinda McClory, produced…

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PAST WINNERS AND NOMINEES LEAD LIST OF OSCAR® PRESENTERS

December 13, 2010 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Beverly Hills, CA – Halle Berry, Jeff Bridges, Sandra Bullock, Marisa Tomei and Oprah Winfrey will present on the 83rd Academy Awards®, telecast producers Bruce Cohen and Don Mischer announced today. In 2001 Berry won the Best Actress Oscar for her role in “Monsters Ball.” She can currently be seen…

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“BLACK SWAN” LEADS WITH A RECORD 12 NOMINATIONS FOR THE 16TH ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE MOVIE AWARDS

“THE KING’S SPEECH” & “TRUE GRIT” EACH SCORE 11 NOMINATIONS “INCEPTION” AND “THE SOCIAL NETWORK” ALSO STAND OUT AWARDS CEREMONY TO BE BROADCAST LIVE ON VH1 FRIDAY, JANUARY 14 AT 9:00 PM ET/PT (Los Angeles, CA – December 13, 2010) – The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) has announced the nominees for the 16th annual…

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LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS GO SOCIAL NETWORK

LOS ANGELES, DECEMBER 12, 2010 – “The Social Network” was voted Best Picture of the Year, it was announced today by Brent Simon, President of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association (LAFCA).  The runner-up was “Carlos.” The 36th annual Los Angeles Film Critics Association awards ceremony will be held Saturday, January 15 at the InterContinental, Los…

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New York Online Crix Make Their Picks

New York Film Critics Online, composed of thirty critics whose outlets are exclusively online and two who are print journalists with a strong online presence, met at Lincoln Center’s Walter Reade Theatre on December 12th and bestowed these awards at its 11th annual meeting: The Complete List: PICTURE The Social Network DIRECTOR David Fincher –…

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The Awards of The 51st Thessaloniki International Film Festival

The International Jury of the 51st Thessaloniki Film Festival comprised of: Michel Demopoulos, Jury President, Film critic (Greece) Mohamed Al-Daradji, Director (Iraq) Scandar Copti, Director (Palestine) Behrooz Hashemian, Producer (Iran/USA) and Martin Schweighofer, Managing Director Of The Austrian Film Commission Bestows: THE AWARDS Best Feature Film Award – Golden Alexander (20.000 euros) PERIFERIC (OUTBOUND) By BOGDAN…

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15 FEATURES IN LINE FOR 2010 VFX OSCAR®

December 10, 2010 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Beverly Hills, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced that 15 films have been selected as semifinalists for Achievement in Visual Effects for the 83rd Academy Awards®. The films are listed below in alphabetical order: “Alice in Wonderland” “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage…

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Press Releases

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin