Press Releases Archive for October, 2007

A Catered Affair in San Diego

October 17, 2007 The horror, of course, is that the sheer energy of crap like Legally Blonde and a single thematic song – in that case “Oh My God” – can drive a show to a lot of audience for a long time. And something much more ambitious and thoughtful, like A Catered Affair, will…

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Young Frankenstein In Seattle – Detailed, Spoiler Notes

August 29, 2007 This is the follow-up to Monday’s spoiler-free review column on Young Frankenstein, now out-of-towning in Seattle. Don’t read a word if you want to maintain a show surprise, though most of it is set by the movie we all know so well. ACT ONE Scene 1: A Village In Transylvania, 1934 “Frankenstein…

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Young Frankenstein In Seattle – Spoiler Free

August 27, 2007 The thrill and the horror of Young Frankenstein is that it, unlike The Producers, has the feel of the giant machine shows that have been hitting Broadway in recent years. For instance, the current Grease revival – generated not by the need for a revival, but as a guaranteed pre-sale based on…

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Not So Under The Sea

Sept 5, 2007 There is no drama like theater people throwing gossip around about the latest show they hope goes down the drain. When shows fail, the gossip is “I told you so.” When the gossiped about shows hit, they suddenly forget that there was any fuss at all. The latest show to get bashed…

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Hairspray: The Musical Movie

July 13, 2007 I first saw it in a slightly premature screening – New Line was thrilled with what was delivered – and the show was so charming and sweet that it was pretty irresistible. Still, there were flaws that stuck out, the most frustrating being that Adam Shankman is a better choreographer than a…

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The Unexpected Pleasure Of Xanadu

June 29, 2007 I saw the biggest new hit to land Off-Broadway in years. Unfortunately for the show, it’s opening on Broadway next Tuesday. Xanadu, which I bought tickets for after a half-price opportunity showed up in the e-mail and have been apologizing for since whenever answering “what are you seeing in New York?,” turns…

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Press Releases

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray