Press Releases Archive for October, 2007

A Catered Affair in San Diego

October 17, 2007 The horror, of course, is that the sheer energy of crap like Legally Blonde and a single thematic song – in that case “Oh My God” – can drive a show to a lot of audience for a long time. And something much more ambitious and thoughtful, like A Catered Affair, will…

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Young Frankenstein In Seattle – Detailed, Spoiler Notes

August 29, 2007 This is the follow-up to Monday’s spoiler-free review column on Young Frankenstein, now out-of-towning in Seattle. Don’t read a word if you want to maintain a show surprise, though most of it is set by the movie we all know so well. ACT ONE Scene 1: A Village In Transylvania, 1934 “Frankenstein…

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Young Frankenstein In Seattle – Spoiler Free

August 27, 2007 The thrill and the horror of Young Frankenstein is that it, unlike The Producers, has the feel of the giant machine shows that have been hitting Broadway in recent years. For instance, the current Grease revival – generated not by the need for a revival, but as a guaranteed pre-sale based on…

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Not So Under The Sea

Sept 5, 2007 There is no drama like theater people throwing gossip around about the latest show they hope goes down the drain. When shows fail, the gossip is “I told you so.” When the gossiped about shows hit, they suddenly forget that there was any fuss at all. The latest show to get bashed…

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Hairspray: The Musical Movie

July 13, 2007 I first saw it in a slightly premature screening – New Line was thrilled with what was delivered – and the show was so charming and sweet that it was pretty irresistible. Still, there were flaws that stuck out, the most frustrating being that Adam Shankman is a better choreographer than a…

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The Unexpected Pleasure Of Xanadu

June 29, 2007 I saw the biggest new hit to land Off-Broadway in years. Unfortunately for the show, it’s opening on Broadway next Tuesday. Xanadu, which I bought tickets for after a half-price opportunity showed up in the e-mail and have been apologizing for since whenever answering “what are you seeing in New York?,” turns…

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Press Releases

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“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch