MCN Originals

The 4-Day Weekend Report

Not a lot changed from the 3-day estimates to the 4-days. Hidden Figures stays out front, cracking $60m cume. The 2 family films, Sing and Monster Trucks (first and last time you will see them mentioned in the same sentence) both are estimating stronger days today than the adult fare. And La La Land stays bullish, breaking past $75m domestic 8 days before Oscar nomination morning.

(No Klady column today)

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The Weekend Report

Hidden Figures seemed an all-too-appropriate chart topper for the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday weekend with an estimated three-day $20.4 million box office. The first holiday of 2017 offered three new national releases and two limited releases going wide, to grim or bland response. The chief exception was horror The Bye Bye Man , slashing to a $13.4 million debut. The ticking clock Sleepless grossed a passable $8.2 million while the widening of Patriots Day was nearly a flag-waver with $11.9 million. The media has already had a field day with commercial pileup Monster Trucks, which revved up to $10.5 million. But the abject rejection of Ben Affleck’s Live By Night prohibition era gangster costumer hasn’t received its fair share of ink. It bowed nationally to $5.2 million.

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Friday Box Office Estimates

A big weekend for expansions and newcomers with one—Hidden Figures, Patriots Day, La La (which also adds IMAX screens), or the other, Bye Bye Man, taking up the top four slots plus another two openers (Sleepless, Monster Trucks) and an expansion (Live by Night) in the top 10. Sitting pat are the two big Christmas hits, Rogue One and Sing, and last week’s disappointing launch for Underworld 5. In limited/exclusive, if your film is in English, it’s not opening to 10k per or better this week.

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The Gronvall Report: Michaël Dudok de Wit On THE RED TURTLE

There are many animals among this year’s contenders for the Best Animated Film Academy Award, including Finding Dory, The Secret Life of Pets and Zootopia, but none as mysterious as the title character in the hauntingly beautiful The Red Turtle. This wordless fable shows how a man shipwrecked on an uninhabited island, far from any other land mass, copes with loneliness and his sometimes hostile environment. The arrival of a giant red sea turtle changes his life in ways he never could have foreseen.

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The DVD Wrapup: Deepwater Horizon, My King, Hickey, Fritz Bauer, Murderlust, Brad Paisley, Since MLK, Broad City … More

Typically, I don’t enjoy reliving disasters on film, whether they’re of the natural variety or manmade. By the time a movie gets released, we’ve absorbed enough actual reporting on the event to make most dramatizations superfluous, if not downright exploitative. Judging from largely unimpressive box-office numbers for recent movies based on such tragedies, I’m pretty sure that the public has grown weary of the instant-replay approach, as well. The producers of Deepwater Horizon had their work cut out for them, because the manmade catastrophe played out in three distinct stages, all well-covered in visual and print media.

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20 Weeks To Oscar: The 4 Kinds Of Best Picture Winners

I believe there are 4 kinds of Best Picture wins.

Big Love.
Big Obligation.
Big Avoidance.
Default.

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The Weekend Report

A definite horse race, but Rogue One edged out the national expansion of Hidden Figures with respective estimated weekends of $21.8 million and $21.7 million. The session’s sole new national release was the latest installment of the Underworld franchise, Blood Wars, with $12.9 million.

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Friday Box Office Estimates

Christmas limited Hidden Figures goes right to the top of New Year’s hangover weekend with a solid $20m+ opening weekend. The return of Underworld arrives in the U.S. with a thud, but the hope for big returns on this are around the world, where the franchise broke through with its most recent episode (2012), doubling its previous best effort and giving hope that this will be a $100m+ grosser internationally. La La Land doubles its screen count weeks before Oscar nominations (and hours before winning Best Musical/Comedy at The Globes, which don’t drive business) and stays even… which might be disappointing for Lionsgate. But it will pass $50 million this weekend and will keep chugging towards $100m domestic, so cheer up!

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Gurus o’ Gold: Let The Ballots Be Filled

In the last pre-Globes Best Picture poll, a lot of stability on top of the Best Picture chart and a lot of instability in the last few potential slots for nomination. Also, The Gurus were asked if they had anything to say about it all at this moment… only 3 decided to speak up.

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The DVD Wrapup: Middle School, Operation Avalanche, Blair Witch, Red Skelton and more

The title, Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life, pretty much sums up the feeling most kids have about the period when they’re forced to come into direct contact with boys and girls their age, but not necessarily from the same neighborhoods or social, ethnic and financial conditions. In John Hughes’ movies, it’s possible for characters from disparate backgrounds to conclude – occasionally under duress – that opposites not only can attract, but reveal an entirely new world of possibilities. Then, when high school beckons, the cycle begins anew. If nothing else, it’s good practice for, college, the military, work and in-laws.

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The Weekend Report (3-Day)

Rogue One made it three in a row with an estimated $49.2 million (all numbers reflect 3-day portion of holiday with updates tomorrow) at the top of the box office charts as 2017 rang in. Sing closed the gap with $41.4 million. Award season favorites, including La La Land, Fences, Manchester By the Sea, Lion and Hidden Figures saw potent spikes.

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Wilmington On Movies: Paterson

A confession. I love Jarmusch’s movies — or most of them anyway, because, like Jerry Seinfeld‘s TV show, they’re so resolutely and unblushingly about nothing or nothing much, or, to be succinct, about the poetry of nothing.

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Gurus o’ Gold: Doc & Foreign Faves

The Gurus are on vacation, but they left behind their thoughts about the short-list races of Feature Documentary and Foreign Language, offering up their personal preferences about both categories. And as always, Best Picture. Happy New Year to all. Oscar nomination voting starts in less than a week.

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20 Weeks To Oscar: The (Shock) Corridor

My problem with The Corridor is that the period has become desperate and grabby. The smartest and the most simplistic players are stuck playing the same game… using fake awards events (high and low) and all forms of screening/dining contraptions and terrible hackneyed advertorial that not even ad buyers expect to be read.

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Fifteen Nonfiction Films For 2016 (Plus 5 Blu-rays)

An alphabetical roster of fifteen fine nonfiction pictures.

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The DVD Wrapup: American Honey, Snowden, Man Called Ove, Orphan Killer and more

Even though American Honey was filmed on location in smallish towns throughout the Midwest – Walmart country, if you will — Arnold brought to the Cannes favorite a familiarity one might not have expected. That’s because, apart from hiring Shia LeBeouf and Riley Keogh for key roles, she committed herself to casting actors who she discovered on the street or virtual unknowns.

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The Weekend Report (4-Day Christmas Edition)

Christmas got crowded but Rogue One led weekend movie charts with an estimated four-day gross of $93.3 million. As expected, the best of the new entries was animated Sing in second spot with a $56 million bow.

Trailing behind with fair results were the sci-fi Passengers that grossed $23 million, the videogame adaption Assassin’s Creed with $15.1 million and the dating comedy Why Him? with $16.8 million.

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The Weekend Report

Rogue One continues to dominate seasonal moviegoing with an estimated $68.5 million for the three-day portion (four-day estimates arrive tomorrow) of the Christmas holidays.

The annual flood of new releases amounted to a lot of coal in stockings. One notable exception was animated Sing, which grossed $33.1 million and appears to be the year-end family option. Otherwise Yule openers struggled to find audiences including sci-fi Passengers, which grossed $13.9 million. Videogame adaptation Assassin’s Creed battled to $10.5 million and the dating comedy Why Him? made out with a $9.9 million.

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Friday Box Office Estimates

Seven studio Christmas weekend releases, four going wide, with three in exclusive runs. There is no comparative title for Sing, but the closest seems to be Alvin & The Chipmunks, which ended up with over $200m domestic. Passengers is looking to be Jennifer Lawrence’s worst wide opening, though not disastrously so, as international is anticipated as a big part of the box office total. Why Him? is soft, though not far off Sisters last December. And Assassin’s Creed seems to be Fox betting that the title will be the next Warcraft, which did only 10% of its business domestically. Silence will be the per-screen winner for the weekend by far, with Patriots Day poised to eventually do better wide than in exclusive release.

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Gurus o’ Gold: ChristmaChanukah Time!

The Gurus answer the question on everyone’s mind… what are the best gifts The Academy could give us this holiday season? And, as always, the latest look at Best Picture, where there isn’t a lot of change. Happy Holidays!!!

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MCN Originals

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I was 15 when I first watched Sally Hardesty escape into the back of a pickup truck, covered in blood and cackling like a goddamn witch. All of her friends were dead. She had been kidnapped, tortured and even forced to feed her own blood to her cannibalistic captors’ impossibly shriveled patriarch. Being new to the horror genre, I was sure she was going to die. It had been a few months since I survived a violent sexual assault, where I subsequently ran from my assailant, tripped, fell and fought like hell. I crawled home with bloody knees, makeup-stained cheeks and a new void in both my mind and heart. My sense of safety, my ability to trust others, my willingness to form new relationships and my love of spending time with people I cared about were all taken from me. It wasn’t until I found the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre that something clicked. It was Sally’s strength, and her resilience. It was watching her survive blows to the head from a hammer. It was watching her break free from her bonds and burst through a glass window. It was watching her get back up after she’d been stabbed. It was watching her crawl into the back of a truck, laughing as it drove away from Leatherface. She was the last one to confront the killer, and live. I remember sitting in front of the TV and thinking, There I am. That’s me.”
~ Lauren Milici On “The Final Girl”

“‘Thriller’ enforced its own reality principle; it was there, part of the every commute, a serenade to every errand, a referent to every purchase, a fact of every life. You didn’t have to like it, you only had to acknowledge it. By July 6, 1984, when the Jacksons played the first show of their ‘Victory’ tour, in Kansas City, Missouri, Jacksonism had produced a system of commodification so complete that whatever and whoever was admitted to it instantly became a new commodity. People were no longer comsuming commodities as such things are conventionally understood (records, videos, posters, books, magazines, key rings, earrings necklaces pins buttons wigs voice-altering devices Pepsis t-shirts underwear hats scarves gloves jackets – and why were there no jeans called Bille Jeans?); they were consuming their own gestures of consumption. That is, they were consuming not a Tayloristic Michael Jackson, or any licensed facsimile, but themselves. Riding a Mobius strip of pure capitalism, that was the transubstantiation.”
~ Greil Marcus On Michael Jackson