MCN Curated Headlines Archive for May, 2018

“Our main influence was more Hendrix, Marvin Gaye, and James Brown. The main concentration was getting Donald looking good in the black cape and the yellow shirt, because the story demanded that was gonna be his main costume throughout.  The whole Lando’s closet thing grew. In the end we made around 30 capes for that room, probably around 30 shirts, 20 scarves, lots of footwear and accessories. The general thing was to make it luxurious as possible. All his available money has gone to his clothing.”
Solo Costume Designers Glynn Dillon and Dave Crossman On Dressing Lando And Han

“Nobody asked me to do it. I read the papers – I see him on television.”
When Donald Pardoned Dinesh

“The whole point of Bob Iger’s great leap forward was supposed to be that once you had these mega-brands they would sell themselves. Apparently not! Marvel’s incredible winning streak remains the exception. The Rule, which has not been repealed, remains defined by DC, Universal Monsters, etc.: A run continues as long as you keep making great movies people can’t wait to see.  Marvel is having an incredible run, but as is the way of all flesh, it’s two bad movies away from collapse.”
The Ankler Is Skeptical On I. P. Drive

“This is not a time to calm down. David Brooks has no right to tell people who are mad as hell to stop being mad as hell. He can afford to be calm and collected because he is so wealthy and sequestered that nothing truly awful can happen to him. His civility is a luxury. He only wants to talk about this shit in civilized terms because he lives a civilized life. His words are those of a man whose foremost experiences in life have happened inside his own rectum. He deserves to have his ass dragged every time someone hits PUBLISH on his behalf. And so do Weiss, and Stephens, and anyone else who thinks they should get a free pass from people just because they endorse crummy ideas in soft academic language.”
Drew Magary Has Words For The Sainted New York Times Op-Ed Cadres

“The element I was always most sure about was the ending, and I was always working toward that ending. The 28 Days Later model is not the way I choose to work now. To be flat out honest about it — there’s no fucking way I want to be in the position of storyboarding endings and shooting extra bits. That does not appeal to me at all. That’s not a happy place to be for me.”
Alex Garland On Ending Annihilation

hollywoodreporter.com

“This isn’t liberals curtailing free speech, it’s Americans rejecting hate speech.”
Writes Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

“More recent imitators lack all intellectual honesty. They throw dates and place names onto the screen as if what you are about to see is a faithful reproduction of events, when they are simply trying to pass off their fiction as authentic. This is basically a marketing ploy that has developed over the last 20 years or so. Unfortunately, fake authenticity sells.”
Historian Antony Beevor Resents War Movies

hollywoodreporter.com

“I absolutely think this is going to end up in a plea deal because I don’t see the defense as having much shot at being successful.”
Cover-Storying Harvey Weinstein’s Chances In Court

variety

“Not enough has been said about the many men and women who poured their hearts and lives into the show and were just getting started on next season. We’re so sorry they were swept up in all of this and we give thanks for their remarkable talents, wish them well, and hope to find another way to work together down the road.”
Disney/ABC Television Group president Ben Sherwood

hollywoodreporter.com

“We found out first through the press. We weren’t sure if it was accurate. But then we heard from Tom Werner that the show was canceled. We all knew it was a possibility but the suddenness of it was a shock.”
Inside The “Roseanne” Writers Room

“I apologize to Valerie Jarrett and to all Americans. I am truly sorry for making a bad joke about her politics and her looks. I should have known better. Forgive me-my joke was in bad taste.”
Roseanne Tweets Some More

MCN Curated Headlines

Why Did Physical Media Sales Drop More Than 86% in Thirteen Years?

Gianopulos Confirmed to Top Paramount After ViacomCBS Merger

Citing Warehouse Capacity, Amazon Slashes Book Orders From Publishers In Holiday Season

Sandy Powell on the Hundreds Of Costume Changes In The Irishman

“If there does end up being a long-term issue for Disney Plus, it’s not that people will be shocked to discover the depth and breadth of weird movies that Walt Disney Pictures made in the 1960s and 1970s. It’s that audiences may stream something like Dumbo and be shocked at what they’ve forgotten from beloved classics or familiar characters. There’s been no mention of the dozens of Mickey Mouse shorts from the first half of the twentieth century, including Mickey’s Mellerdrammer, in which Mickey and friends perform a version of  “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” complete with blackface. Disney Plus is offering hundreds of titles that have long been unavailable or ignored. But while they’re opening the vault, there doesn’t seem to be a strategy to contextualize what people will find inside it.”

Cats

“These businesses will coexist. It’s not like one is going to go away and everything goes into the other.” Berwick said the cable industry had “comfort” on its side — familiar programs like “The Real Housewives” and channels with distinct identities. Not everyone likes the streaming experience, which turns the semi-passive act of channel surfing into more of an active hunt. They “want to see the familiar and not to have to make a decision,” she said. Yet look at how fast streaming services have expanded. Netflix, which started serving up movies and shows online 12 years ago, has grown into a giant, with 158 million subscribers worldwide. Amazon Prime Video is available to 100 million Amazon Prime members. Hulu has 28.5 million. Analysts expect Disney Plus to have at least eight million customers by the time it is seven weeks old and 76 million at the end of five years.No lesser a force than Rupert Murdoch decided on a tactical retreat. Rather than slug it out with Disney and the tech companies muscling onto his turf, he hung a For Sale sign on most of his entertainment assets, including non-news cable channels like FX and the 20th Century Fox television and movie studio. Disney outgunned Comcast by paying $71.3 billion for the properties, with Mr. Iger contending that the purchase would supercharge Disney’s streaming plans.”

Tom Hall on Valuing Art

A Studio Tour With Comics Artist Bill Sienkiewicz

Wilder on Lubitsch Touch

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It shows how out of it I was in trying to be in it, acknowledging that I was out of it to myself, and then thinking, “Okay, how do I stop being out of it? Well, I get some legitimate illogical narrative ideas” — some novel, you know?

So I decided on three writers that I might be able to option their material and get some producer, or myself as producer, and then get some writer to do a screenplay on it, and maybe make a movie.

And so the three projects were “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep,” “Naked Lunch” and a collection of Bukowski. Which, in 1975, forget it — I mean, that was nuts. Hollywood would not touch any of that, but I was looking for something commercial, and I thought that all of these things were coming.

There would be no Blade Runner if there was no Ray Bradbury. I couldn’t find Philip K. Dick. His agent didn’t even know where he was. And so I gave up.

I was walking down the street and I ran into Bradbury — he directed a play that I was going to do as an actor, so we know each other, but he yelled “hi” — and I’d forgot who he was.

So at my girlfriend Barbara Hershey’s urging — I was with her at that moment — she said, “Talk to him! That guy really wants to talk to you,” and I said “No, fuck him,” and keep walking.

But then I did, and then I realized who it was, and I thought, “Wait, he’s in that realm, maybe he knows Philip K. Dick.” I said, “You know a guy named—” “Yeah, sure — you want his phone number?”

My friend paid my rent for a year while I wrote, because it turned out we couldn’t get a writer. My friends kept on me about, well, if you can’t get a writer, then you write.”
~ Hampton Fancher

“That was the most disappointing thing to me in how this thing was played. Is that I’m on the phone with you now, after all that’s been said, and the fundamental distinction between what James is dealing with in these other cases is not actually brought to the fore. The fundamental difference is that James Franco didn’t seek to use his position to have sex with anyone. There’s not a case of that. He wasn’t using his position or status to try to solicit a sexual favor from anyone. If he had — if that were what the accusation involved — the show would not have gone on. We would have folded up shop and we would have not completed the show. Because then it would have been the same as Harvey Weinstein, or Les Moonves, or any of these cases that are fundamental to this new paradigm. Did you not notice that? Why did you not notice that? Is that not something notable to say, journalistically? Because nobody could find the voice to say it. I’m not just being rhetorical. Why is it that you and the other critics, none of you could find the voice to say, “You know, it’s not this, it’s that”? Because — let me go on and speak further to this. If you go back to the L.A. Times piece, that’s what it lacked. That’s what they were not able to deliver. The one example in the five that involved an issue of a sexual act was between James and a woman he was dating, who he was not working with. There was no professional dynamic in any capacity.

~ David Simon