MCN Curated Headlines Archive for April, 2018

“Because we care so deeply about the important work of journalism, we must all together work to elevate it. Is it appropriate that we invite a celebrity to launch a relentless, and often vulgar, attack on the very people we cover? As if we can go back the next day to don our cloak of impartiality and all is well? I know you agree our credibility is far too important to compromise over a 20-minute abdication of the high road and a few cheap laughs.”
Gannett-USA TODAY Publisher Comes Out Swinging Against Comedian Michelle Wolf, In Spirited Defense of Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders

“We did not act carelessly or in any way ‘force matters’ as Mr Juan Branco has said in the press. Our entire profession knows that ‘forcing matters’ has always been Mr Branco’s favourite method, and we should recall that he organised a press conference a few years ago where he denounced the Festival de Cannes because it had not kept a ‘promise to select’ one of his films. This was an accusation which didn’t go anywhere, because the Festival does not make promises to select films: it either selects them or it does not.”
Cannes Sets “Urgent Hearing” On Status Of Closing Night Film, The Quixote Of Gilliam

“I have no common place in contemporary film, not then, not now. I never got the Hollywood deal, I never went to film school, I never went to big Hollywood parties, I never had a PR person, which is probably why I used to call myself Captain Autonomous-Anonymous. I was never in favor with any group, be it audiences or critics or the financing system. They and I didn’t hear the same tune from the beginning. I barely had an agent half my career, and for me to go out begging for money at this age – some old guy no one’s ever heard of, and if they have, they don’t like his movies anyway! – I find it ridiculous.”
Alan Rudolph’s Got A New Alan Rudolph Movie

nymag

“The New York Establishment will ignore unscrupulous acts to serve its interests — just look how it treated Roy Cohn, onetime lawyer to the president.”
Frank Rich Cover-Stories America’s Great Satan

“It’s increasingly impossible to make a living in theatre.”
Brit Playwright Hannah Khalil

NY Times

“The Profound Normalcy of a Day at the Movies in Saudi Arabia: ‘It is truly a revolutionary time'”
Haifaa Al Mansour

hollywoodreporter.com

“Marvel spent 10 years methodically and carefully creating a universe of characters, worlds and stories that all led to this and, in doing so, created an event unlike anything the business has ever seen.”
Disney Distribution Chief 

“You’re not suggesting that I made this up, are you? I understand that there’s room for skepticism. I’m not a skeptic. I don’t make films or move through my life as a skeptic. I’m not interested in skepticism, that’s something you’re either born with or acquire as you live. You don’t know a damn thing, and neither do I. Nobody knows if there is an afterlife, a heaven or hell. What is our purpose here? Nobody knows that! We have no idea!”
William Friedkin

nymag

“One Has This Feeling of Having Contributed to Something That’s Gone Very Wrong.”
VR Pioneer Jaron Lanier on Silicon Valley Politics and What Went Wrong With the Internet

NY Times

“I‘ve seen what happens when we pretend that these guys can simply disappear once they’ve been pushed out. In my experience, they resurface elsewhere, often to prey on others.”
The Problem With “Passing the Trash”

thestar.com

“I don’t like its sterility. I like a film with a little more emotional balls, just as a movie, to get involved in. But as a work of art, I love it. It had an had an enormous, enormous impact on me, at a certain point.”
James Cameron Rejects 2001: A Space Odyssey

“When I first came up with the idea of utilitarian music, it was very, very unpopular. It meant Muzak. It was music reduced, stripped of its fundamental cultural importance. And that was my biggest hurdle. Artists were supposed to want people’s 100 per cent attention. But what was the least that I could do with music; how much could I leave out? What if I made music that was just like an atmosphere?”
Brian Eno

“The global adoption of one language form – in effect a standardization of mass audiovisual media – is a central issue of the media crisis. It means, for example, that a documentary film can basically have much the same form and narrative structure as a Netflix drama series.”
Peter Watkins Looks At “The Dark Side Of The Moon” At The Age Of Eighty-Two

MCN Curated Headlines

The Pope on: "ABC’s decision to cancel 'Roseanne' feels like a gutsy move. It looks like a stand against racism, a line drawn in the sand to delineate what is reasonable and what is not. It even looks like a data point in the 'How do we separate the art from the artist?' debate, and it offers a heartening answer: We don’t have to, because, in this case, ABC will not finance that artist. It’s somehow even more heartening because it comes from a massive corporate conglomerate that might lose money by making this decision. It feels remarkably just. It feels decent. I’m thrilled that Roseanne has been canceled. It was the right thing to do. But it doesn’t feel correct to hold up ABC as a new bastion of decency, either. 'Roseanne' felt like the Titanic, a ship that seemed too big to turn around — but in the aftermath of Barr’s tweet, it also seemed like a ship that was doomed. ABC’s decision to cancel Roseanne is a good thing, but it also seems like a decision to shut down something that was about to implode anyhow. With a little more context, it looks like a network taking a strong stance against racism… in a way that also rids them of a show that was about to fall apart anyhow."

Sergio on: "Even though the Marvel series are TV shows, Netflix has become entranced by this notion of the '13-hour movie' when developing a season. This format mashup does a disservice to both mediums. Television's strength lies in episodic structure, which allows writers to explore different tones, characters, story structure and conflict. Movies allow a filmmaker to hone in on one or two central themes, attack it from multiple angles and get out. Netflix’s model takes the most incompatible parts of each and slaps them together, creating a lumbering mutant medium. The '13-hour movie' model means we don’t get the brevity of a film or the variation of television; it means we get the singular focus of movies stretched out to television length. It’s exhausting and it does these heroes no favors."

tidalmediainc on: Black Panther: $387 Million Worldwide

Frances Aubrey on: David Klion On “Unlearning Woody Allen”

Ray Pride on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

YancySkancy on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Debbie on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Warren on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Amazing GBG on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Why put it in a box? This is the number one problem I have—by the way it’s a fair question, I’m not saying that—with this kind of festival situation is that there’s always this temptation to classify the movie immediately and if you look at it—and I’ve tried to warn my fellow jurors of this—directors and movie critics are the worst people to judge movies! Directors are always thinking, “I could do that.” Critics are always saying, “This part of the movie is like the 1947 version and this part…” And it’s like, “Fuck! Just watch the movie and try and absorb it and not compare it to some other fucking movie and put it in a box!” So I think the answer’s both and maybe neither, I don’t know. That’s for you to see and criticize me for or not.”
~ James Gray

“I have long defined filmmaking and directing in particular as just a sort of long-term act of letting go,” she said. “It’s honestly just gratifying that people are sort of reapproaching or reassessing the film. I like to just remind everyone that the movie is still the same — it’s the same movie, it’s the movie we always made, and it was the movie we always wanted to make. And maybe it just came several years too early.”
~ Karyn Kusama