MCN Curated Headlines Archive for April, 2018

“It is critical that Mr. Weinstein be granted access to e-mails relevant to the certain civil proceedings and criminal investigations and that are in the Debtors’ possession, as they were sent or received by his TWC e-mail accounts. The Debtors’ continued refusal to permit Mr. Weinstein to access these emails has significantly impinged his ability to effectively defend himself from these allegations and is a continuing deprivation of his due-process rights.”
Harvey Weinstein Hoves Into View At Bankruptcy Court

LA Times

“There are a lot of people inside and outside who think that these are reasonable issues, that the academy is not being well run… It’s a bit knee-jerk, and it’s trying to figure out what it wants to be. The final thing that pushed me over the edge is I went back to incite change and to get a better academy, and I did not feel like I was successful at all.”
Bill Mechanic Speaks

thestar.com

“The major change is to make sure that all of our programming — the festival, our learning programs, our theatrical releases, our Cinematheque, everything that we do — all works in the same direction to serve this incredible audience that we have and to use all of the tools of TIFF to do that. We want to keep our audience really engaged and excited. People are always going to want to share experiences with other people. They’re always going to want to share that discovery of a new movie.”
Cameron Bailey On New Responsibilities At Toronto Int’l And TIFF Lightbox

“They would finally have to reveal to the public how their titles perform.”
“Netflix has rejected showing its movies at some willing theaters, and Hw’d insiders don’t understand why”

“Wall Street meets Apocalypse Now, Cavicchia as Colonel Kurtz, ensconced upriver in his suite eight floors above the security team. People were shocked that no one from the bank or Palantir set any real limits. They darkly joked he was listening to calls, reading their emails, watching them come and go. Some planted fake information in communications to see if Cavicchia would mention it at meetings, which he did. It ended when JPMorgan’s senior executives learned that they, too, were being watched, and what began as a promising marriage of masters of big data and global finance descended into a spying scandal. An intelligence platform designed for the global War on Terror was weaponized against ordinary Americans at home.”
“Palantir Knows Everything About You”

hollywoodreporter.com

“Given this opportunity, I’m sure that Saudi Arabian filmmakers are now going to start making the kinds of films that will gain recognition all over the world. And I bet very soon, a film from Saudi Arabia will get nominated for an Oscar. I love that you’re going to the movies!”
“Tom Rothman, Jeff Shell, Jim Gianopulos, Alan Bergman and Kevin Tsujihara were among those to record special video messages for the historic screening of Black Panther on Wednesday night in Riyadh.”

LA Times

“Netflix would like to get some of its movies for Oscar contention or other types of industry awards. They’re trying to get credibility. Netflix took off when a couple of their own titles got nominated for Emmys. That lent credibility to what they’re doing. If they can do that for various awards, that might raise the platform.”
Netflix Has Considered Buying Up Brick-‘n’-Mortar as Oscar Showcases For Streaming Content

NY Times

“Monáe soundlessly padded into the room, clad in a velour caftan, gold earrings and rings to match. She was barefoot, her toes painted metallic silver.”
Jenna Wortham On “How Janelle Monáe Found Her Voice”

“It’s incredibly saddening that a group of people with an agenda are willing to advocate untruths and say anything just to attempt to discredit the Weekly and anyone who is involved with it.”
“The new owners discussed ‘influencer programs,’ to help mitigate the PR-shitstorm we were consumed in, and touted their vast Rolodex of friends flocking to advertise in the paper and site, primarily from the corporate-marijuana industry. They discussed prospecting celebrities in some instances to produce written content on films — not interviewed by reporters or writers, but stories on movies by the movie stars that appear in them.”
An Insider’s First-Person Account Of What Became Of LA WEEKLY

MCN Curated Headlines

Sergio on: "Even though the Marvel series are TV shows, Netflix has become entranced by this notion of the '13-hour movie' when developing a season. This format mashup does a disservice to both mediums. Television's strength lies in episodic structure, which allows writers to explore different tones, characters, story structure and conflict. Movies allow a filmmaker to hone in on one or two central themes, attack it from multiple angles and get out. Netflix’s model takes the most incompatible parts of each and slaps them together, creating a lumbering mutant medium. The '13-hour movie' model means we don’t get the brevity of a film or the variation of television; it means we get the singular focus of movies stretched out to television length. It’s exhausting and it does these heroes no favors."

tidalmediainc on: Black Panther: $387 Million Worldwide

Frances Aubrey on: David Klion On “Unlearning Woody Allen”

Ray Pride on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

YancySkancy on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Debbie on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Warren on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Amazing GBG on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Roy Batty on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

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“I had a knockoff Michael Kors bag that said MLK instead of MK. Jada told me that I shouldn’t have knockoff stuff. I told her that my philosophy is, Whatever the bag costs, I should be able to keep that amount of cash in the bag. If it’s a $300 purse, I have to put $300 in cash in that purse. I do not want a bag that is more expensive than the cash I have to put in it. Things are going good for me now, so I am graduating to your Fendis and your Guccis. But I better have the cash equivalent, or I’m not buying the purse. And if things start to go wrong, I’m going right back to my knockoffs. When you’re somebody like me, who’s been homeless, clothes are not that important. Clothes are not a roof over my head, food in my ­stomach, my family’s health—that’s what money is for. But fashion helps get more money. So, we ride.”
~ Tiffany Haddish

“It’s the job of the artist, to exploit connections. You see, I speak on behalf of the world of the artist without hesitation! People don’t realize that the part of the playwright is finding something for people to talk about. If you are writing about a historical episode, or two characters in ‘Hamlet,’ you have a structure for free.”
~ Tom Stoppard