MCN Curated Headlines Archive for February, 2018


Kevin Smith Does A Good Twenty Minutes On Being Alive

The Int’l Documentary Association Looks Behind The Nominated Shorts: Edith + EddieHeaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405Heroin(e)Knife SkillsTraffic Stop

“The lighthouse is surrounded by crystal trees that resemble the synapses of the brain. This lighthouse is desire, as with Virginia Woolf, and also the frontier that separates our own minds from others’. Here we see an embodied meditation on subjectivity and trauma. Lena finds the meteor that has punched through the lighthouse’s wall, and climbs down the wound it created, into the subconscious.”
Josephine Livingstone On Annihilation

variety

“Franklin has been accused of being verbally abusive to staffers and making inappropriate statements in the writers’ room, including making sexually charged comments about his personal relationships and sex life. Franklin has not been accused of directly sexually harassing or engaging in physical misconduct with any staffers.”
Netflix Fires “Fuller House” Showrunner Jeff Franklin; Warner Bros. TV Severs Deal Over Complaints

“There’s been a huge refusal in many quarters to criticize the CIA for fear of undermining the morale of the agency. I find that to be a kind of cheap excuse. It’s time the agency was held to account, because I don’t think anyone has done that.”
CIA Publicly Indicates Displeasure With “The Looming Tower”

variety

Guadagnino “is similar to me in that he often uses cinema rather than reality as the point of departure for his inspiration. There are many directors who use reality as their basis. Luca’s reality is in the films that precede him, the cinema that he loves. So since he loves my body of work, it’s possible that he has taken it as the basis of his reality. For him, reality is cinema.”
Bernardo Bertolucci

Argentine Director Hugo Santiago, 78, Films Include Invasión, With Adolfo Bioy Casares And Jorge Luis Borges; Robert Bresson’s Assistant Director 1959-66

Santiago On Bioy Casares And Borges 24’43” video

OSCAR VOTING HAS CLOSED.

 Francis Coppola’s Got A Notion About That There Future

“When I was in preproduction and then shooting it and then editing it, it really felt like ‘this is what I always wanted to do’. I got to draw on all the experience that I had and the work that I’d done in learning to make movies. All of that kicked in, which was tremendously satisfying and what I had hoped would happen! But the truth is you never know until you’re there.”
Greta Gerwig

“At Sundance, we had such a diverse crew of all-female department heads, and every executive producer is a white man. And they’re great fucking white men! They invested in this movie and gave me all this freedom. They’re perfectly awesome. But I was like, Wow, the money still lives in one place. And I think that’s true not just of my film, that’s true in all of Hollywood. The money’s still trickling out down to us from them, despite all the changes. Luckily there are some good ones. To speak to their generosity, I don’t think any of them were like, “We need to make our money back on this.” I think they were getting into it to support the art.”
Josephine Decker

hollywoodreporter.com

“Endless sexual miscommunication and bitter rancor lie ahead. But thanks to the miracle of technology, most of the great movies of Hw’d history are now easily accessible — a collective epic of complex emotion that once magnificently captured the magic and mystique of sex.”
Camille Paglia Weighs In On Movies And Modern Communication

“You must just acknowledge deep in your heart of hearts that people are supposed to fuck. It is our main purpose in life, and all those other activities — playing the trumpet, vacuuming carpets, reading mystery novels, eating chocolate mousse — are just ways of passing the time until you can fuck again. Well, maybe not eating chocolate mousse. If it is made with good Swiss chocolate and topped off with Devon cream, eating chocolate mousse is almost as good as fucking.”
Writer Cynthia Heimel Was 70

MCN Curated Headlines

Thawn Chwithy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Some Random Troll on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Trenton Moore on: Philadelphia Film Critics Circle Nod Roma as Best Film, Cinematography and Foreign Film

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Karen Christy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

The Pope on: "ABC’s decision to cancel 'Roseanne' feels like a gutsy move. It looks like a stand against racism, a line drawn in the sand to delineate what is reasonable and what is not. It even looks like a data point in the 'How do we separate the art from the artist?' debate, and it offers a heartening answer: We don’t have to, because, in this case, ABC will not finance that artist. It’s somehow even more heartening because it comes from a massive corporate conglomerate that might lose money by making this decision. It feels remarkably just. It feels decent. I’m thrilled that Roseanne has been canceled. It was the right thing to do. But it doesn’t feel correct to hold up ABC as a new bastion of decency, either. 'Roseanne' felt like the Titanic, a ship that seemed too big to turn around — but in the aftermath of Barr’s tweet, it also seemed like a ship that was doomed. ABC’s decision to cancel Roseanne is a good thing, but it also seems like a decision to shut down something that was about to implode anyhow. With a little more context, it looks like a network taking a strong stance against racism… in a way that also rids them of a show that was about to fall apart anyhow."

Sergio on: "Even though the Marvel series are TV shows, Netflix has become entranced by this notion of the '13-hour movie' when developing a season. This format mashup does a disservice to both mediums. Television's strength lies in episodic structure, which allows writers to explore different tones, characters, story structure and conflict. Movies allow a filmmaker to hone in on one or two central themes, attack it from multiple angles and get out. Netflix’s model takes the most incompatible parts of each and slaps them together, creating a lumbering mutant medium. The '13-hour movie' model means we don’t get the brevity of a film or the variation of television; it means we get the singular focus of movies stretched out to television length. It’s exhausting and it does these heroes no favors."

tidalmediainc on: Black Panther: $387 Million Worldwide

Frances Aubrey on: David Klion On “Unlearning Woody Allen”

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I had this friend who was my roommate for a while. She seemed really normal in every way except that she wouldn’t buy shampoo. She would only use my shampoo. And after a year it’s like, “When are you going to buy your own shampoo?” It was her way of digging in her heels. It was a certain sense of entitlement, or a certain anger. It was so interesting to me why she wouldn’t buy her own fucking shampoo. It was like,“I’m gonna use yours.” It was coming from a place of “You have more money than me, I just know it”—whether I did or I didn’t. Or maybe she felt, “You have a better life than me,” or “You have a better room than me in the apartment.” It was hostile. And she was a really close friend! There was never any other shampoo and I knew she was washing her hair. And clearly I have a thing about shampoo, as we see in ‘Friends with Money.’ I had some nice shampoo. So I found that psychologically so interesting how a person can function normally in every way and yet have this aberrance—it’s like a skip in the record. It was a sense of entitlement, I think. I put that in Olivia’s character, too, with her stealing someone’s face cream.”
Nicole Holofcener

“When books become a thing, they can no longer be fine.

“Literary people get mad at Knausgård the same way they get mad at Jonathan Franzen, a writer who, if I’m being honest, might be fine. I’m rarely honest about Jonathan Franzen. He’s an extremely annoying manI have only read bits and pieces of his novels, and while I’ve stopped reading many novels even though they were pretty good or great, I have always stopped reading Jonathan Franzen’s novels because I thought they were aggressively boring and dumb and smug. But why do I think this? I didn’t read him when he was a new interesting writer who wrote a couple of weird books and then hit it big with ‘The Corrections,’ a moment in which I might have picked him up with curiosity and read with an open mind; I only noticed him once, after David Foster Wallace had died, he became the heir apparent for the Great American Novelist position, once he had had that thing with Oprah and started giving interviews in which he said all manner of dumb shit; I only noticed him well after I had been told he was An Important Writer.

“So I can’t and shouldn’t pretend that I am unmoved by the lazily-satisfied gentle arrogance he projects or when he is given license to project it by the has-the-whole-world-gone-crazy development of him being constantly crowned and re-crowned as Is He The Great American Writer. What I really object to is this, and if there’s anything to his writing beyond it, I can’t see it and can’t be bothered. Others read him and tell me he’s actually a good writer—people whose critical instincts I have learned to respect—so I feel sure that he’s probably a perfectly fine, that his books are fine, and that probably even his stupid goddamned bird essays are probably also fine.

“But it’s too late. He has become a thing; he can’t be fine.”
~ Aaron Bady