MCN Curated Headlines Archive for August, 2017

hollywoodreporter.com

“When Metrocolor closed, we were collecting our material and I came across some of the original missing footage. That was really fortunate. We printed it in a different section and put it together to get the director’s cut. We scanned the disparate parts in 4K resolution and put it back together — the original negative and then the deleted scenes for the pieces we found. We had picture source material for the rest; it was kind of a checkerboard.”
Close Encounters Reissue Is “Final 1997 Director’s Cut”

“The studios blacklisted me for making Walker. Roger Ebert and his fellow creep critics working for the man, as usual. I won’t feel the least vindicated until Universal and MGM and Fox pay me all the money they owe me for Repo ManSid and Nancy and Walker.”
Alex Cox Talks Walker

NY Times

“It’s really turning into a wake. To throw out almost all of the union members goes against the grain of the Voice we love and cherish.”
Village Voice To Fire 13 Of 17 Union Employees After Final Print Edition Third Week Of September

“Her left-field masterpiece; a picture that’s antic, sensual and strange, with a top-note of menace and a malarial air. The heat is intense; the settlers go berserk. Nobody here is quite stable; nothing can be trusted.”
Xan Brooks: Zama Gaga!

“The concept of spirituality does involve a stepping away from the maelstrom of activity and the maelstrom of action and empathy. Action and empathy are the two primary tools of a filmmaker. That’s why they’re called moving pictures: picture have empathy and movement has movement. So what happens when you say, “I’m going to show you inaction and characters who have no personality so you can’t empathize with them?” Now you’re fighting against the medium and its strong points. Obviously, not many people try this because it’s not a terribly commercial enterprise.”
From March, Paul Schrader Revisits Transcendental Style And Side-Eyes “Slow Cinema”

“Schrader, one of the crucial creators of the modern cinema, seems to have made it in a state of anger, passion, pain, mourning, and desire, held together by the conflicted religious fury—blending exaltation and torment—that runs through all of his films. First Reformed has the feeling of a summation, of a teeming and roiling avowal of his longtime obsessions, from the distant pressure of family life as a child to the repellent politics currently unfolding. In his most recent films, Schrader has been showing what the later years of a career are meant for: freedom, the lack of inhibition.”
Richard Brody On Paul Schrader’s First Reformed

variety

“It’s a piece of 1970s grindhouse pseudo-psychology, applied to 21st-century violence. He’s like a graphic-novel version of Travis Bickle; he embraces ——— as a form of slumming. (And there’s a romance too!)”
Owen Gleiberman‘s Spoiler-Doused Notice Says Schrader’s Film Is Good, But Bad, But Good, But Bad

“Glass-domed Leisureland is merely America in microcosm, with all the same corruption and wealth-disparity, loneliness and strife. Neither does it exist in splendid isolation. If the outside world starts to burn, then Leisureland is all-but guaranteed to go down in flames too. What a spry, nuanced, winningly digressive movie this is.”
Grauniad Headlines Downsizing As A “Masterpiece”

MCN Curated Headlines

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“The sad and painful truth is that pretty much everyone in this town knew who Harvey was. I have had long talks with my most liberal friends. Did we know he was a rapist? We didn’t. But did we know that for decades he has been offering actresses big careers in exchange for sexual favors? Yes, we did — and make no mistake, that is its own kind of rape. And did we all — or did any of us — refuse to do business with him on moral grounds? No. We ALL STAYED IN BUSINESS WITH HIM. I have never done business with Harvey but I can tell you with certainty that I would have — because I was recently approached by a film festival he sponsors. They asked me to submit my short film for their consideration and I did it without thinking twice. I am a dyed-in-the-wool feminist and a vocal one at that. So why didn’t I think twice? Because this entire town is built on the ugly principals that Harvey takes to an horrific extreme. If I didn’t work with people whose behavior I find reprehensible, I wouldn’t have a career.”
~ Showrunner Krista Vernoff

From AMPAS president John Bailey:

Dear Fellow Academy Members,

Danish director Carl Dreyer’s 1928 film “The Passion of Joan of Arc” is not only one of the visual landmarks of the silent era, but is a deeply disturbing portrait of a young woman’s persecution in the face of the male judges and priests of the ruling order. The actress Maria Falconetti gave one of the most profoundly affecting performances in the history of cinema as the Maid of Orleans.

Since the decision of the Academy’s Board of Governors on Saturday October 14 to expel producer Harvey Weinstein from its membership, I have been haunted not only by the recurring image of Falconetti and the sad arc of her career (dying in Argentina in 1946, reputedly from a crash diet) but of Joan’s refusal to submit to an auto de fe recantation of her beliefs.

Recent public testimonies by some of filmdom’s most recognized women regarding sexual intimidation, predation, and physical force is, clearly, a turning point in the film industry—and hopefully in our country, where what happens in the world of movies becomes a marker of societal Zeitgeist. Their decision to stand up against a powerful, abusive male not only parallels the cinema courage of Falconetti’s Joan but gives all women courage to speak up.

After Saturday’s Board of Governors meeting, the Academy issued a passionately worded statement, expressing not only our concern about harassment in the film industry, but our intention to be a strong voice in changing the culture of sexual exploitation in the movie business, already common well before the founding of the Academy 90 years ago. It is up to all of us Academy members to more clearly define for ourselves the parameters of proper conduct, of sexual equality, and respect for our fellow artists throughout our industry. The Academy cannot, and will not, be an inquisitorial court, but we can be part of a larger initiative to define standards of behavior, and to support the vulnerable women and men who may be at personal and career risk because of violations of ethical standards by their peers.

Yours,
John