MCN Curated Headlines Archive for May, 2017

NY Times

Good Time doesn’t peddle a message or redemption, but instead tethers you to an oblivious narcissist who pushes the story into an ever-deepening downward spiral. As errors turn into catastrophes, Connie grows increasingly feral, becoming a character who is a biliously funny reproach to the American triumphalism that suffuses superhero flicks and indies alike and insists that success isn’t just inevitable but also a birthright.”
Manohla Dargis With Robert Pattinson

“May understands there is a judging prick inside many of us, particularly when we’re rolling through a series of terrible dates. You don’t exactly feel sorry for Henry, you just recognize those moments of distaste. And cringe. For everyone involved.”
Kim Morgan On Elaine May’s A New Leaf

“Working mothers are not very welcome at the Cannes Film Festival, it seems. This year at least two mothers attending the fest have spoken out about the major barriers they’ve encountered.”
Nanna Frank Rasmussen Says Cannes Doesn’t Do Enough To Accommodate Mothers

Almodóvar Jury Awards Palme d’Or To Östlund’s The Square; Grand Prix, BPM; Director, Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled; Actor, Joaquin Phoenix,You Were Never Really Here; Actress, Diane Kruger In In the Fade; Screenplay (Tie) The Killing Of A Sacred DeerYou Were Never Really Here; Jury Prize: Zvyagintsev’s LovelessNicole Kidman, With Four Fest Features, Gets A Special 70th Anniversary Award

NY Times

“Sitting in the Roman Polanski Suite at the Cannes Carlton Hotel, Kirsten Dunst did her best to smile.”
Manohla Dargis On An Actress Who Calls Her Own Shots

“Ismail was my life’s partner. From the beginning right on down to his final day. I lived openly with him for forty-five years, in New York and wherever else we were. That says what it says.”
James Ivory At 89

NY Times

“His America is a troubled land, staggering from wretched excess and aching losses, a country where dreams have often slipped into out-and-out delusions, and people hunger for deliverance, if only in the person of a half-baked messiah. Reason is in short supply here, and grifters and con men peddling conspiracy thinking and fake news abound; families are often fragmented or nonexistent; and primal, Darwinian urges have replaced the rule of law.”
Michiko Kakutani On Denis Johnson

“I come from a middle-class family and I grew up at a time when the golden age of cinema was over in Mexico. Cinema was my survival instinct, I needed it. I wouldn’t recommend the path I took to anyone!”
Watch Or Listen To Alfonso Cuaron’s Cannes Masterclass 85 minutes

variety

“This was both fortunate and unfortunate. Fortunate because it made Leviathan a public event, so even the name of the movie has become a kind of a meme, a synonym for certain political and social troubles. It polarized the audience in a brutal way, made everyone discuss the movie, and divided not just the viewing audience but society itself. There were people who defended the movie and people who considered it to be Russophobic.”
Loveless Released In Russia Directly After Cannes Debut Over Previous Pic’s Piracy In Form Of Ten Million Downloads

“Write naked. Write in exile. Write in blood.”
Breathtakingly Great American Novelist Denis Johnson Was 67; Work Includes Jesus’ Son, “Tree Of Smoke”

From “Jesus’ Son,” “Happy Hour” And “Emergency Room

Johnson’s “Homeless And High

“Once in a while, I lie there as the television runs, and I read something wild and ancient from one of several collections of folktales I own. Apples that summon sea maidens, eggs that fulfill any wish, and pears that make people grow long noses that fall off again. Then sometimes I get up and don my robe and go out into our quiet neighborhood looking for a magic thread, a magic sword, a magic horse.”
From Denis Johnson‘s 2014 “The Largesse Of The Sea Maiden”

MCN Curated Headlines

Troy on: Jan-Michael Vincent Was 73

eht% on: Kubrick by Weegee

Thawn Chwithy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Some Random Troll on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Trenton Moore on: Philadelphia Film Critics Circle Nod Roma as Best Film, Cinematography and Foreign Film

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Karen Christy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

The Pope on: "ABC’s decision to cancel 'Roseanne' feels like a gutsy move. It looks like a stand against racism, a line drawn in the sand to delineate what is reasonable and what is not. It even looks like a data point in the 'How do we separate the art from the artist?' debate, and it offers a heartening answer: We don’t have to, because, in this case, ABC will not finance that artist. It’s somehow even more heartening because it comes from a massive corporate conglomerate that might lose money by making this decision. It feels remarkably just. It feels decent. I’m thrilled that Roseanne has been canceled. It was the right thing to do. But it doesn’t feel correct to hold up ABC as a new bastion of decency, either. 'Roseanne' felt like the Titanic, a ship that seemed too big to turn around — but in the aftermath of Barr’s tweet, it also seemed like a ship that was doomed. ABC’s decision to cancel Roseanne is a good thing, but it also seems like a decision to shut down something that was about to implode anyhow. With a little more context, it looks like a network taking a strong stance against racism… in a way that also rids them of a show that was about to fall apart anyhow."

Sergio on: "Even though the Marvel series are TV shows, Netflix has become entranced by this notion of the '13-hour movie' when developing a season. This format mashup does a disservice to both mediums. Television's strength lies in episodic structure, which allows writers to explore different tones, characters, story structure and conflict. Movies allow a filmmaker to hone in on one or two central themes, attack it from multiple angles and get out. Netflix’s model takes the most incompatible parts of each and slaps them together, creating a lumbering mutant medium. The '13-hour movie' model means we don’t get the brevity of a film or the variation of television; it means we get the singular focus of movies stretched out to television length. It’s exhausting and it does these heroes no favors."

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I remember very much the iconography and the images and the statues in church were very emotional for me. Just the power of that, and even still — just seeing prayer card, what that image can evoke. I have a lot of friends that are involved in the esoteric, and I know some girls in New York that are also into the supernatural. I don’t feel that I have that gift. But I am leaning towards mysticism… Maybe men are more practical, maybe they don’t give into that as much… And then also, they don’t convene in the same way that women do. But I don’t know, I am not a man, I don’t want to speak for men. For me, I tend to gravitate towards people who are open to those kinds of things. And the idea for my film, White Echo, I guess stemmed from that — I find that the girls in New York are more credible. What is it about the way that they communicate their ideas with the supernatural that I find more credible? And that is where it began. All the characters are also based on friends of mine. I worked with Refinery29 on that film, and found that they really invest in you which is so rare in this industry.”
Chloë Sevigny

“The word I have fallen in love with lately is ‘Hellenic.’ Greek in its mythology. So while everyone is skewing towards the YouTube generation, here we are making two-and-a-half-hour movies and trying to buck the system. It’s become clear to me that we are never going to be a perfect fit with Hollywood; we will always be the renegade Texans running around trying to stir the pot. Really it’s not provocation for the sake of being provocative, but trying to make something that people fall in love with and has staying power. I think people are going to remember Dragged Across Concrete and these other movies decades from now. I do not believe that they will remember some of the stuff that big Hollywood has put out in the last couple of years. You’ve got to look at the independent space to find the movies that have been really special recently. Even though I don’t share the same world-view as some of my colleagues, I certainly respect the hell out of their movies which are way more fascinating than the stuff coming out of the studio system.”
~ Dallas Sonnier