MCN Curated Headlines Archive for May, 2017

“Our hit ratio is way too high. So, we’ve canceled very few shows. I’m always pushing the content team: We have to take more risk, you have to try more crazy things. Because we should have a higher cancel rate overall.”
Netflix Hastings Says The Streamer Will Start Axing Shows Because They’re Too Successful; Intends To Increase Spending Above Present $6 Billion

indie wire

“The shocking truth is that the Observer has been going down the drain financially for quite some time. The end of what was the remains of a once-vital and responsible New York paper came when [Jared Kushner] threw what was left of a great weekly paper under the bus and lost all interest in bringing it back to life again by focusing his interests on running the White House and digging a tunnel to Russia.”
NYObserver Fires 78-Year-Old Film Critic Rex Reed As It Slims To Staff Of A Dozen
AndGlenn Kenny Remembers Reed’s Riot Acting In Myra Breckenridge

“#WonderWoman: Warner Bros. is gambling $150M with a filmmaker whose only prior big-screen credit was an $8M indie”
The Reporter Tweets What It Really Thinks About Women Directing Studio Pictures

“The documentary process is the reverse of fiction filmmaking. Every time there was a problem on set or anything went wrong, it was perfect for the documentary and made it more interesting, more vital, more alive. The fiction film experience is the flipside, and it wasn’t fun when things go wrong. I learned to really appreciate what my husband, my daughter, my son — people who work behind the scenes — had gone through, and I gained a lot of appreciation for them.”
Eleanor Coppola Tells Marshall Shaffer About Her Fiction Debut At 81

“I was paid a visit at my dorm room at @nyuwinstein and questioned by the CIA because they found the color xerox of my passport in The General’s desk drawer at his residence and wanted to know about my relationship with him.”
Brett Ratner Remembers Manuel Noriega

“In Ramsay’s cinema, emotion is memory, and it feeds the present and the future.”
Bilge Ebiri On You Were Never Really Here

LA Times

Superman had been a favorite movie of mine, even when I was at Cooper Union. People were painting a portrait of the career that I could have as an indie New York filmmaker. The only thing that stood in my way from staying in New York — because I loved New York and I wanted to stay — was something more that I wanted to do that was inspired by Superman. One day I would love to sing a song to the world, to bring something into the world that is beautiful in that sort of way.”
Meredith Woerner Meets Patty Jenkins

“I Love Women Who Hate Men and Hate Men Who Hate Women”
Might Be John Waters For All We Know

NY Times

“After 54 Years, We Fell in Love. After Five Months, I Got Leukemia. I Thought It Was A Romantic Comedy. I Was Wrong About The Comedy.”
Delia Ephron On A Gift Her Sister, Nora Ephron, Left Her

MCN Curated Headlines

Frances Aubrey on: David Klion On “Unlearning Woody Allen”

Ray Pride on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

YancySkancy on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Debbie on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Warren on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Amazing GBG on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Roy Batty on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: 19 For Your Consideration Screenplays Await

Tom Spath on: 19 For Your Consideration Screenplays Await

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Film festivals, for those who don’t know, are not exactly the glitzy red carpet affairs you see on TV. Those do happen, but they’re a tiny part of the festival. The main part of any film festival are the thousands of people with festival passes hanging on lanyards beneath their anoraks, carrying brochures for movies you have never and will never hear of, desperately scrabbling to sell whatever movie it is to buyers from all over the world. Every hotel bar, every cafe, every restaurant is filled to the brim with these people, talking loudly about non-existent deals. The Brits are the worst because most of the British film industry, with a few honourable exceptions, are scam artists and chancers who move around from company to company failing to get anything good made and trying to cast Danny Dyer in anything that moves. I’m seeing guys here who I first met twenty years ago and who are still wearing the same clothes, doing the same job (albeit for a different company) and spinning the same line of bullshit about how THIS movie has Al Pacino or Meryl Streep or George Clooney attached and, whilst that last one didn’t work out, THIS ONE is going to be HUGE. As the day goes on, they start drinking and it all gets ugly and, well, that’s why I’m the guy walking through the Tiergarten with a camera taking pictures of frozen lakes and pretending this isn’t happening.

“Berlin is cool, though and I’ve been lucky to be doing meetings with some people who want to actually get things done. We’ll see what comes of it.”
~ Julian Simpson 

“The difference between poetry and prose, and why if you’re not acculturated to poetry, you might resist it: that page is frightening. Why is it not filled? The two categories of people who don’t feel that way are children and prisoners. So many prison poets; they see that gap and experience it differently. I’m for the gap!”
~ Poet Eileen Myles