MCN Curated Headlines Archive for April, 2017

NY Times

“Owning Sky outright would give the Murdochs an important new cash generator to feed the rapacious appetite for growth and conquest that has made their family business the most influential media conglomerate in the world — one that helped hasten Britain’s ‘Brexit’ from the European Union and helped deliver Donald J. Trump to the White House.”
Murdoch British TV Deal Hinges On The Three Words “Fit And Proper”

“When you see a big thing in the sky, run for it, because they are a lot smarter than we are, and if you are stupid enough to challenge them, you will be taken out in three seconds.”
Sir Ridley Says It Will Be Unwise To Challenge Incoming Aliens

hollywoodreporter.com

“The first Godfather cost $6.5 million, the second Godfather cost $11-12 million, which if you convert that, it would take a major studio. But it would never get through the process of getting a greenlight. Nothing will get a greenlight today unless it’s a movie where they can have a whole series and a Marvel comics type of thing.”
Coppola & Co. At Radio City Music Hall

“There is no denying that much of the new Canadian film Below Her Mouth qualifies as unmitigated smut.”
Lede Of The Weekend

“Demme was also blessed by a larger liberalism: the imaginative outreach, hard to discern in the rampant studio movies of today, which assumes that everybody is worth stopping for—that there will always be folks who repay the camera’s attention. What he radiated, before or behind the lens, was an unstinting curiosity, and a faith that the most reliable map of character was the human face.”
Anthony Lane On Jonathan Demme

“It was 1969, I was only three, and as Dad stood at the back of the crowd, watching the bidding, he seemed to escape his body and floated up to the ceiling from where he watched for a while longer before slipping back into his body again. Only then did he realize one of the bidders was him. He’d bought the property without knowing that was his intention when he walked in. He describes it a surreal moment in his life when he didn’t know he was moving to Ireland at all.”
Charley Boorman Has Tales To Tell

“With the death of Demme, American cinema loses one of its greatest humanists. His work didn’t simply glow with a generosity of spirit. You got the sense that he understood people — that he understood us. He was a kind of secret-sharer, a creator of cinematic worlds where anything was possible and anything could be said.”
Bilge Ebiri‘s Swell Reminiscence Of Jonathan Demme

hollywoodreporter.com

“To get younger audiences interested in the actual news, you have to play that up. Half of what I do — well, on social media specifically — is fucking with people.”
Words From The Internet “Troll” With The White House Press Credentials

MCN Curated Headlines

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I suddenly couldn’t say anything about some of the movies. They were just so terrible, and I’d already written about so many terrible movies. I love writing about movies when I can discover something in them – when I can get something out of them that I can share with people. The week I quit, I hadn’t planned on it. But I wrote up a couple of movies, and I read what I’d written, and it was just incredibly depressing. I thought, I’ve got nothing to share from this. One of them was of that movie with Woody Allen and Bette Midler, Scenes From a Mall. I couldn’t write another bad review of Bette Midler. I thought she was so brilliant, and when I saw her in that terrible production of ‘Gypsy’ on television, my heart sank. And I’d already panned her in Beaches. How can you go on panning people in picture after picture when you know they were great just a few years before? You have so much emotional investment in praising people that when you have to pan the same people a few years later, it tears your spirits apart.”
~ Pauline Kael On Quitting

“My father was a Jerome. My daughter’s middle name is Jerome. But my most vexing and vexed relationship with a Jerome was with Jerome Levitch, the subject of my first book under his stage and screen name, Jerry Lewis.

I have a lot of strong and complex feelings about the man, who passed away today in Las Vegas at age 91. Suffice to say he was a brilliant talent, an immense humanitarian, a difficult boss/interview, and a quixotic sort of genius, as often inspired as insipid, as often tender as caustic.

I wrote all about it in my 1996 book, “King of Comedy,” which is available on Kindle. With all due humility, it’s kinda definitive — the good and the bad — even though it’s two decades old. My favorite review, and one I begged St. Martin’s (unsuccessfully) to put on the paperback jacket, came from “Screw” magazine, which called it “A remarkably fair portrait of a great American asshole.”

Jerry and I met twice while I was working on the book and spoke/wrote to each other perhaps a dozen times. Like many of his relationships with the press and his partners/subordinates, it ended badly, with Jerry hollering profanities at me in the cabin of his yacht in San Diego. I wrote about it in the epilogue to my book, and over the years I’ve had the scene quoted back to me by Steve Martin, Harry Shearer, Paul Provenza and Penn Jillette. Tom Hanks once told me that he had a dinner with Paul Reiser and Martin Short at which Short spent the night imitating Jerry throwing me off the boat.

Jerry was a lot of things: father, husband, chum, businessman, philanthropist, artist, innovator, clown, tyrant. He was at various times in his life the highest-ever-paid performer on TV, in movies, and on Broadway. He raised BILLIONS for charity, invented filmmaking techniques, made perhaps a dozen classic comedies, turned in a terrific dramatic performance in Martin Scorsese’s “The King of Comedy,” and left the world altered and even enhanced with his time and his work in it.

That’s an estimable achievement and one worth pausing to commemorate.

#RIP to Le Roi du Crazy

~ Biographer Shawn Levy on Jerry Lewis on Facebook