MCN Curated Headlines Archive for March, 2017

“We experimented a lot with facial features where we might try an Asian eye with an African arm. It was really difficult to get all that stuff working in harmony in a concise character that doesn’t just look like some hodgepodge that’s been thrown together.”
WETA Workshoppers On Making Ghost In The Shell‘s Robotic Psycho Geisha Girls And More

“Oh, man. Thank you for this question. As a football supporter, I feel Mexican. But my true self is completely Latin American. Mexico is my cocina, my kitchen. It is where I hang, where I talk to my mother. But Latin America is my home. If you travel through Latin America, you see we are one. We all share the same history, the same spirit. It is the real melting pot. Go back far enough and I don’t even know where I come from.”
Gael García Bernal

LA Times

“I see movies all the time where I question why the hell they even made them, because the animus is so clearly nonfilmic. I don’t mean that you need to have thundering herds or raging gunfights as opposed to ideas, but I think certain things are more filmic than others. Genre filmmaking does supply a kind of structure that allows the filmmaker and the audience some common ground to then say, ‘Let’s see what we’re going to do on our little journey here.'”
Walter Hill On Genre

“The only platform I’m interested in talking about is theatrical exhibition.”
“Netflix, my ass.”
“I hope people see it in the theatre, where it was meant to be seen.”
Christopher Nolan, Tom Rothman And Sofia Coppola At CinemaCon

hollywoodreporter.com

“I think we proved to you that we really believe in the theatrical experience by fully supporting the theatrical window for our releases.”
Amazon Studios On Supporting Theatrical Window

“These days, there’s also a continuing crisis in masculinity that’s tied up with deindustrialization and the rise of feminism and cultural equality.”
T2 Trainspotting‘s Irvine Welsh In The Modern World

NY Times

“I got sick and tired of seeing ballets about relationships, or mythological forests 10 centuries ago. Of the ballets I saw, very few of them were about the contemporary world. So I thought why not take an extreme subject — like psychotics in a prison for the criminally insane — and see if something resembling a classical ballet could be made out of their behavior, their movements, their tics, convulsions and obsessions.”
At Eighty-Seven, Frederick Wiseman Turns To The Ballet

“It’s a true collaboration with us. He taught me everything. I knew nothing about editing. But it’s a true collaboration now, and I can’t begin to tell you how much of a joy it is to be in the room with him. Because we talk about everything, not just the movie. And he’s so rich, he’s such an extraordinary genius, and to watch the suffering he goes through while making a movie is something quite special to share.”
Thelma Schoonmaker On A Life In Martin Scorsese Movies

hollywoodreporter.com

“I can’t presume to say what everybody is getting from the film. It definitely, for lack of a better word, is a more fun way to engage in a discussion about race.”
Jordan Peele On What Get Out Can Teach H’wd

MCN Curated Headlines

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray