MCN Curated Headlines Archive for March, 2017

“We experimented a lot with facial features where we might try an Asian eye with an African arm. It was really difficult to get all that stuff working in harmony in a concise character that doesn’t just look like some hodgepodge that’s been thrown together.”
WETA Workshoppers On Making Ghost In The Shell‘s Robotic Psycho Geisha Girls And More

“Oh, man. Thank you for this question. As a football supporter, I feel Mexican. But my true self is completely Latin American. Mexico is my cocina, my kitchen. It is where I hang, where I talk to my mother. But Latin America is my home. If you travel through Latin America, you see we are one. We all share the same history, the same spirit. It is the real melting pot. Go back far enough and I don’t even know where I come from.”
Gael García Bernal

LA Times

“I see movies all the time where I question why the hell they even made them, because the animus is so clearly nonfilmic. I don’t mean that you need to have thundering herds or raging gunfights as opposed to ideas, but I think certain things are more filmic than others. Genre filmmaking does supply a kind of structure that allows the filmmaker and the audience some common ground to then say, ‘Let’s see what we’re going to do on our little journey here.'”
Walter Hill On Genre

“The only platform I’m interested in talking about is theatrical exhibition.”
“Netflix, my ass.”
“I hope people see it in the theatre, where it was meant to be seen.”
Christopher Nolan, Tom Rothman And Sofia Coppola At CinemaCon

hollywoodreporter.com

“I think we proved to you that we really believe in the theatrical experience by fully supporting the theatrical window for our releases.”
Amazon Studios On Supporting Theatrical Window

“These days, there’s also a continuing crisis in masculinity that’s tied up with deindustrialization and the rise of feminism and cultural equality.”
T2 Trainspotting‘s Irvine Welsh In The Modern World

NY Times

“I got sick and tired of seeing ballets about relationships, or mythological forests 10 centuries ago. Of the ballets I saw, very few of them were about the contemporary world. So I thought why not take an extreme subject — like psychotics in a prison for the criminally insane — and see if something resembling a classical ballet could be made out of their behavior, their movements, their tics, convulsions and obsessions.”
At Eighty-Seven, Frederick Wiseman Turns To The Ballet

“It’s a true collaboration with us. He taught me everything. I knew nothing about editing. But it’s a true collaboration now, and I can’t begin to tell you how much of a joy it is to be in the room with him. Because we talk about everything, not just the movie. And he’s so rich, he’s such an extraordinary genius, and to watch the suffering he goes through while making a movie is something quite special to share.”
Thelma Schoonmaker On A Life In Martin Scorsese Movies

hollywoodreporter.com

“I can’t presume to say what everybody is getting from the film. It definitely, for lack of a better word, is a more fun way to engage in a discussion about race.”
Jordan Peele On What Get Out Can Teach H’wd

MCN Curated Headlines

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“I’ve been pleasantly surprised by how many recappers, while clearly over their heads, are baseline sympathetic to finding themselves routinely unmoored, even if that means repeating over and over that this is closer to “avant-garde art” than  normal TV to meet the word count. My feed was busy connecting the dots to Peter Tscherkassky (gas station), Tony Conrad (the giant staring at feedback of what we’ve just seen), Pat O’Neill (bombs away) et al., and this is all apposite — visual and conceptual thinking along possibly inadvertent parallel lines. If recappers can’t find those exact reference points to latch onto, that speaks less to willful ignorance than to how unfortunately severed experimental film is from nearly all mainstream discussions of film because it’s generally hard to see outside of privileged contexts (fests, academia, the secret knowledge of a self-preserving circle working with a very finite set of resources and publicity access to the larger world); resources/capital/access/etc. So I won’t assign demerits for willful incuriosity, even if some recappers are reduced, in some unpleasantly condescending/bluffing cases, to dismissing this as a “student film” — because presumably experimentation is something the seasoned artist gets out of their system in maturity, following the George Lucas Model of graduating from Bruce Conner visuals to Lawrence Kasdan’s screenwriting.”
~ Vadim Rizov Goes For It, A Bit

“On the first ‘Twin Peaks,’ doing TV was like going from a mansion to a hut. But the arthouses are gone now, so cable television is a godsend — they’re the new art houses. You’ve got tons of freedom to do the work you want to do on TV, but there is a restriction in terms of picture and sound. The range of television is restricted. It’s hard for the power and the glory to come through. In other words, you can have things in a theater much louder and also much quieter. With TV, the quieter things have to be louder and the louder things have to be quieter, so you have less dynamics. The picture quality — it’s fine if you have a giant television with a good speaker system, but a lot of people will watch this on their laptops or whatever, so the picture and the sound are going to suffer big time. Optimally, people should be watching TV in a dark room with no disturbances and with as big and good a picture as possible and with as great sound as possible.”
~ David Lynch