MCN Curated Headlines Archive for March, 2017

“We experimented a lot with facial features where we might try an Asian eye with an African arm. It was really difficult to get all that stuff working in harmony in a concise character that doesn’t just look like some hodgepodge that’s been thrown together.”
WETA Workshoppers On Making Ghost In The Shell‘s Robotic Psycho Geisha Girls And More

“Oh, man. Thank you for this question. As a football supporter, I feel Mexican. But my true self is completely Latin American. Mexico is my cocina, my kitchen. It is where I hang, where I talk to my mother. But Latin America is my home. If you travel through Latin America, you see we are one. We all share the same history, the same spirit. It is the real melting pot. Go back far enough and I don’t even know where I come from.”
Gael García Bernal

LA Times

“I see movies all the time where I question why the hell they even made them, because the animus is so clearly nonfilmic. I don’t mean that you need to have thundering herds or raging gunfights as opposed to ideas, but I think certain things are more filmic than others. Genre filmmaking does supply a kind of structure that allows the filmmaker and the audience some common ground to then say, ‘Let’s see what we’re going to do on our little journey here.'”
Walter Hill On Genre

“The only platform I’m interested in talking about is theatrical exhibition.”
“Netflix, my ass.”
“I hope people see it in the theatre, where it was meant to be seen.”
Christopher Nolan, Tom Rothman And Sofia Coppola At CinemaCon

hollywoodreporter.com

“I think we proved to you that we really believe in the theatrical experience by fully supporting the theatrical window for our releases.”
Amazon Studios On Supporting Theatrical Window

“These days, there’s also a continuing crisis in masculinity that’s tied up with deindustrialization and the rise of feminism and cultural equality.”
T2 Trainspotting‘s Irvine Welsh In The Modern World

NY Times

“I got sick and tired of seeing ballets about relationships, or mythological forests 10 centuries ago. Of the ballets I saw, very few of them were about the contemporary world. So I thought why not take an extreme subject — like psychotics in a prison for the criminally insane — and see if something resembling a classical ballet could be made out of their behavior, their movements, their tics, convulsions and obsessions.”
At Eighty-Seven, Frederick Wiseman Turns To The Ballet

“It’s a true collaboration with us. He taught me everything. I knew nothing about editing. But it’s a true collaboration now, and I can’t begin to tell you how much of a joy it is to be in the room with him. Because we talk about everything, not just the movie. And he’s so rich, he’s such an extraordinary genius, and to watch the suffering he goes through while making a movie is something quite special to share.”
Thelma Schoonmaker On A Life In Martin Scorsese Movies

hollywoodreporter.com

“I can’t presume to say what everybody is getting from the film. It definitely, for lack of a better word, is a more fun way to engage in a discussion about race.”
Jordan Peele On What Get Out Can Teach H’wd

MCN Curated Headlines

“You reap what you sow. I know that he believed for years that he was untouchable, and a lot of people helped him be untouchable.”

Promoting Human Flow, Director-Dissident Ai Weiwei Calls Trump Win “The Moment I Think History Stopped”

Good Dr. Bordwell On Heist Movies

Richard Wilbur, 96, Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Winner

PGA Expels Disgraced Harvey Weinstein

“Harvey Weinstein Has Been Expelled by the Oscar Board—Which Hollywood Sex Offender Is Next?”

“Barry Lyndon. I can’t believe there was a time when I didn’t know that name. Barry Lyndon means an artwork both grand and glum. Sadness inconsolable. What makes Barry Lyndon my own story? Have I lived to subsume it or have I subsumed it to live?”

“Tonight, I read a newspaper article about Mr. Harvey and [memories about the incident] resurfaced within me as if it was just yesterday,” she wrote in the post in Vietnamese. “I believe that I can’t be silent anymore. It’s time that I liberate myself. It’s time that I can explain about the Shanghai failure and why I shelved my ‘American dream’ as well as the contract with Weinstein’s film company.”

Barrack’s Colony Capital “has entered into a preliminary agreement to provide an immediate capital infusion”into The Weinstein Company: “We will help return the Company to its rightful iconic position in the independent film and television industry.”

“Let me tell you something that people don’t know. For the last five years, I’ve probably talked to my brother ten times on any personal level. That’s the fracture that’s gone on. I actually was quite aware that Harvey was philandering with every woman he could meet. I was sick and disgusted by his actions. No F-in’ way was I aware that that was the type of predator that he was. Harvey was a bully, Harvey was arrogant, he treated people like shit all the time. That I knew. I had to divorce myself to survive. Nobody is perfect. I’m not perfect. If I made mistakes, I apologize to everyone for not standing up stronger and sooner. And I’ll apologize for my own lack of strength at times.”

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From AMPAS president John Bailey:

Dear Fellow Academy Members,

Danish director Carl Dreyer’s 1928 film “The Passion of Joan of Arc” is not only one of the visual landmarks of the silent era, but is a deeply disturbing portrait of a young woman’s persecution in the face of the male judges and priests of the ruling order. The actress Maria Falconetti gave one of the most profoundly affecting performances in the history of cinema as the Maid of Orleans.

Since the decision of the Academy’s Board of Governors on Saturday October 14 to expel producer Harvey Weinstein from its membership, I have been haunted not only by the recurring image of Falconetti and the sad arc of her career (dying in Argentina in 1946, reputedly from a crash diet) but of Joan’s refusal to submit to an auto de fe recantation of her beliefs.

Recent public testimonies by some of filmdom’s most recognized women regarding sexual intimidation, predation, and physical force is, clearly, a turning point in the film industry—and hopefully in our country, where what happens in the world of movies becomes a marker of societal Zeitgeist. Their decision to stand up against a powerful, abusive male not only parallels the cinema courage of Falconetti’s Joan but gives all women courage to speak up.

After Saturday’s Board of Governors meeting, the Academy issued a passionately worded statement, expressing not only our concern about harassment in the film industry, but our intention to be a strong voice in changing the culture of sexual exploitation in the movie business, already common well before the founding of the Academy 90 years ago. It is up to all of us Academy members to more clearly define for ourselves the parameters of proper conduct, of sexual equality, and respect for our fellow artists throughout our industry. The Academy cannot, and will not, be an inquisitorial court, but we can be part of a larger initiative to define standards of behavior, and to support the vulnerable women and men who may be at personal and career risk because of violations of ethical standards by their peers.

Yours,
John

.“People that are liars — lying to his wife, to his children, to everyone — well, they have to turn around and say, ‘Who stabbed me?’ It’s unbelievable that even to this moment he is more concerned with who sold him out. I don’t hear concern or contrition for the victims. And I want them to hear that.”
~ Bob Weinstein