MCN Curated Headlines Archive for February, 2017

hollywoodreporter.com

“Unlikely as it is, I find myself rising to defend Warren Beatty.”
Kim Masters Considers Beatty’s Perplex From Journalistic Experience

For independent cinema there’s no limits except the law. So if you explore certain taboos then it’s a question of legality and morality, depending on where your moral compass leads you. I am trying to make films about provocative subjects but get larger budgets for them, but that’s when you start to realize how deeply conservative cinema is.”
Canadian Filmmaker Bruce LaBruce On His Latest Provocation

“As I said last night, once you go away from the Earth and look back at the Earth, you see no borders, no lines separating countries. It is one, whole, beautiful unit.”
Why Asghar Farhadi Sent Two Iranian Scientists To Accept Oscar
And – Jafar Panahi On Farhadi’s Win

“The problem is that unfamiliarity is the punchline. Not Kimmel’s unfamiliarity due to ignorance, mind you, but rather the perceived abnormality or exoticism of the names in question, a perspective that is comes from a limited, geo-centric worldview wherein any name that doesn’t fit America’s Amy/Patrick/Jimmy canon is worthy of derision.”
On Jimmy Kimmel’s Casual Racism At Oscar

“Adherents of the Ahmadiyya faith—Ahmadis—cannot practice it without facing legal prosecution or the wrath of a vigilante mob.”
Pakistanis Astir; Mahershala Ali’s Faith Not Considered Muslim

“We have spent last night and today investigating the circumstances, and will determine what actions are appropriate going forward. We are unwaveringly committed to upholding the integrity of the Oscars and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.”
The Academy Statement About PwC Best Picture Failure

NY Daily News

NYDN-PwC

Ouch.

“Straight talk is a strong way for both managers and employees to handle a crisis. Radical transparency strengthens teams and confers authority on the managers who use it.”
“Four Great Success Lessons From The Spectacular Oscars Disaster”

LA Times

“He in sleek tux, she resplendent in white gown, they took the stage. The night was nearly done, a touch of class for the final prize. No one saw or anticipated the iceberg.”
Jeffrey Fleishman‘s Bristling Backstage Oscar Tick-Tock

Screen Shot 2017-02-27 at 5.28.06 PMScreen Shot 2017-02-27 at 5.26.46 PM

LA Times

“Truly, if surrealist Luis Buñuel had had a writing credit on the program he could not have done it any better.”
Kenneth Turan On Oscar Night

“A congratulatory tweet was posted. We later removed the post to avoid any misperception that the USG endorsed the comments made in the acceptance speech.”
State Department Tweets, Then Goes Back On Congratulations To Asghar Farhadi

“Watching videos of the biggest gaffe in Oscar history this morning, it seems to me that Warren Beatty not only realized he was handed the wrong envelope, but that he was delighted at being handed a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. And decided to have a little fun with the people who snubbed him, as well as promoting his ironically named Rules Don’t Apply on a global scale.”
Lou Lumenick Thinks Beatty Was Masterfully “Playing Puzzlement”

Guy Hamilton, Pierre Etaix, Don Ireland, Herschell Gordon Lewis, Gloria DeHaven, Robert Vaughn, Michele Morgan, Anne Jackson, Steven Hill, Marvin Kaplan, William Schallert, Burt Kwouk, Doris Roberts, Alec McCowen, Fyvush Finkel, Jon Polito, Garry Shandling, Miguel Ferrer, Alexis Arquette, Florence Henderson, Teresa Saldana… and many more
A Rollcall Of Those Passed Over By Oscar “In Memoriam”

wsj

Screen Shot 2017-02-27 at 2.10.55 AM

“On his Twitter bio, Mr. Cullinan describes himself as ‘Counting Oscar ballots and keeping secrets.'”
PricewaterhouseCooper Managing Partner Was Backstage Tweeting Photos Of Emma Stone Before He Handed The Wrong Envelope To Warren Beatty

“We sincerely apologize to Moonlight, La La Land, Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway and Oscar viewers for the error that was made during the award announcement for Best Picture. The presenters had mistakenly been given the wrong category envelope and when discovered, was immediately corrected. We are currently investigating how this could have happened, and deeply regret that this occurred. We appreciate the grace with which the nominees, the Academy, ABC and Jimmy Kimmel handled the situation,” Says PwC

moonlight
Rules Don’t Apply (Complete Oscar Winners List)

MCN Curated Headlines

Troy on: Jan-Michael Vincent Was 73

eht% on: Kubrick by Weegee

Thawn Chwithy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Some Random Troll on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Trenton Moore on: Philadelphia Film Critics Circle Nod Roma as Best Film, Cinematography and Foreign Film

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Karen Christy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

The Pope on: "ABC’s decision to cancel 'Roseanne' feels like a gutsy move. It looks like a stand against racism, a line drawn in the sand to delineate what is reasonable and what is not. It even looks like a data point in the 'How do we separate the art from the artist?' debate, and it offers a heartening answer: We don’t have to, because, in this case, ABC will not finance that artist. It’s somehow even more heartening because it comes from a massive corporate conglomerate that might lose money by making this decision. It feels remarkably just. It feels decent. I’m thrilled that Roseanne has been canceled. It was the right thing to do. But it doesn’t feel correct to hold up ABC as a new bastion of decency, either. 'Roseanne' felt like the Titanic, a ship that seemed too big to turn around — but in the aftermath of Barr’s tweet, it also seemed like a ship that was doomed. ABC’s decision to cancel Roseanne is a good thing, but it also seems like a decision to shut down something that was about to implode anyhow. With a little more context, it looks like a network taking a strong stance against racism… in a way that also rids them of a show that was about to fall apart anyhow."

Sergio on: "Even though the Marvel series are TV shows, Netflix has become entranced by this notion of the '13-hour movie' when developing a season. This format mashup does a disservice to both mediums. Television's strength lies in episodic structure, which allows writers to explore different tones, characters, story structure and conflict. Movies allow a filmmaker to hone in on one or two central themes, attack it from multiple angles and get out. Netflix’s model takes the most incompatible parts of each and slaps them together, creating a lumbering mutant medium. The '13-hour movie' model means we don’t get the brevity of a film or the variation of television; it means we get the singular focus of movies stretched out to television length. It’s exhausting and it does these heroes no favors."

Quote Unquotesee all »

“With any character, the way I think about it is, you have the role on the page, you have the vision of the director and you have your life experience… I thought it was one of the foundations of the role for John Wick. I love his grief. For the character and in life, it’s about the love of the person you’re grieving for, and any time you can keep company with that fire, it is warm. I absolutely relate to that, and I don’t think you ever work through it. Grief and loss, those are things that don’t ever go away. They stay with you.”
~ Keanu Reeves

“I was checking through stuff the other day for technical reasons. I came across The Duellists on Netflix and I was absolutely stunned to see that it was exquisitely graded. So, while I rarely look up my old stuff, I stopped to give it ten minutes. Bugger me, I was there for two hours. I was really fucking pleased with what it was and how the engine still worked within the equation and that engine was the insanity and stupidity of war. War between two men, in that case, who fight on thought they both eventually can’t remember the reason why. It was great, yeah. The great thing about these platforms now is that, one way or another, they’ll seek out and then put out the best possible form and the long form. Frequently, films get cut down because of that curse in which the studio felt or feels that they have to preview. And there’s nothing worse than a preview to diminish the original intent.Oh, yeah, how about every fucking time? And I’ve stewed about films later even more because when you tell the same joke 20 times the joke’s no longer funny. When you tell a bad joke once or twice? It’s fine. But come on, now. Here’s the key on the way I feel when I approach the movie: I try to keep myself as withdrawn from the project as possible once I’ve filmed it. And – this is all key on this – then getting a really excellent editor so I never have to sit in on editing. What happens if you sit in is you become stale and every passage or joke, metaphorically speaking, gets more and more tired. You start cutting it all back because of fatigue. So what you have to do is keep your distance and therefore, in a funny kind of way, you, as the director, should be the preview and that’s it.”
~ Sir Ridley Scott