MCN Curated Headlines Archive for January, 2017

ny post

“I really do think that right now, certainly advertisers and anyone who is involved in any part of the media really does have to question the results of the kind of decades, decades-long sleazy reality TV, radio talk show that goes so over the top, etcetera. I think it is worth thinking about that stuff right now.”
Fox Broadcasting Pioneer, Tinder Mogul Billionaire Barry Diller Takes Some Time Out To Trash Modern Media 

NY Times

“I’m a dirty hippie. I love patchouli; I just love it straight. Give me Venice Beach, 1982. I love cedar wood, too. I love woody accords — sandalwood, Nag Champa.”
Drew Barrymore Remains Dishy About Beauty

“You bowl, then turn with great joy to your husband, and say: ‘Strike!’”
Filmmaker Anna Broinowski On Being An Extra In A North Korean Propaganda Film

hollywoodreporter.com

“Like Thalberg, they knew there was a bottom line; but like him, they were sometimes willing to defy it for the love of the movies.”
Stephen Galloway Deifies Irving Thalberg, Craving A Latter-Day Successor

ew

“There are just too many dead blondes to fit into one season!”
Karina Longworth On What’s Next For “You Must Remember This”

“The model here is Senator Martin in The Silence of the Lambs, pleading for the life of her kidnapped child.”
Slate Tells Oscar Winners What To Do: Have An Ex-Refugee Tucked Under Your Arm, Despite Academy Rules

“I’m a filmmaker and an artist and I take this to heart. I come from a war-torn country that no longer exists. I’ve been an immigrant in multiple countries since my birth country dissolved in 1992. After 17 years in the U.S., I’m now an American. The ink is still wet on my Naturalization Certificate. I’m excited about the future and I’m excited about whatever small contribution I can make to its betterment.”
Filmmaker Iva Radivojevic On An Era Of Opportunity

MCN Curated Headlines

Sergio on: "Even though the Marvel series are TV shows, Netflix has become entranced by this notion of the '13-hour movie' when developing a season. This format mashup does a disservice to both mediums. Television's strength lies in episodic structure, which allows writers to explore different tones, characters, story structure and conflict. Movies allow a filmmaker to hone in on one or two central themes, attack it from multiple angles and get out. Netflix’s model takes the most incompatible parts of each and slaps them together, creating a lumbering mutant medium. The '13-hour movie' model means we don’t get the brevity of a film or the variation of television; it means we get the singular focus of movies stretched out to television length. It’s exhausting and it does these heroes no favors."

tidalmediainc on: Black Panther: $387 Million Worldwide

Frances Aubrey on: David Klion On “Unlearning Woody Allen”

Ray Pride on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

YancySkancy on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Debbie on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Warren on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Amazing GBG on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Roy Batty on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

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“I had a knockoff Michael Kors bag that said MLK instead of MK. Jada told me that I shouldn’t have knockoff stuff. I told her that my philosophy is, Whatever the bag costs, I should be able to keep that amount of cash in the bag. If it’s a $300 purse, I have to put $300 in cash in that purse. I do not want a bag that is more expensive than the cash I have to put in it. Things are going good for me now, so I am graduating to your Fendis and your Guccis. But I better have the cash equivalent, or I’m not buying the purse. And if things start to go wrong, I’m going right back to my knockoffs. When you’re somebody like me, who’s been homeless, clothes are not that important. Clothes are not a roof over my head, food in my ­stomach, my family’s health—that’s what money is for. But fashion helps get more money. So, we ride.”
~ Tiffany Haddish

“It’s the job of the artist, to exploit connections. You see, I speak on behalf of the world of the artist without hesitation! People don’t realize that the part of the playwright is finding something for people to talk about. If you are writing about a historical episode, or two characters in ‘Hamlet,’ you have a structure for free.”
~ Tom Stoppard