MCN Curated Headlines Archive for October, 2016

hollywoodreporter.com

“I’m going to push. Not only for better tools, workflow, high dynamic range and high frame rates — the things we are working toward. I’m still very bullish on 3D, but we need brighter projection, and ultimately I think it can happen — with no glasses. We’ll get there.”
James Cameron Promises Tech To Go With The Many Avatar Sequels

“We were partly plotting our escape from Akron in the future and we were investigating whatever stuff we could get our hands on that was a little outside. We were Midwestern and suddenly that was, wow, this is our stuff: This is working-class, wild-ass primal music. Yeah, that had a big effect.”
Jim Jarmusch On The Seed Of Gimme Danger

NY Times

“The black penis is imagined more than it’s seen, which isn’t surprising. This newly relaxed standard for showing penises feels like a triumph of juvenile phallocentrism — it’s dudes peeking over a urinal divider and, as often as not, giggling at what they see. Not all of that peeking is harmless; some of those dudes are scared of what they’ve seen.”
Wesley Morris Rocks Out With His Pop Out, Essaying The “Last Taboo: Black Male Sexuality”

“Astaire is clearly not an experimental dancer like Twyla Tharp or Pina Bausch, but he is surreal in the sense of surpassing the real. He is transcendent. When he dances a question proposes itself: what if a body moved like this through the world? But it is only a rhetorical, fantastical question, for no bodies move like Astaire, no, we only move like him in our dreams.”
Zadie Smith‘s Dance Lessons For Writers

“The Mary Sue thing in itself is sexist because it’s the name of a woman.”
Daisy Ridley Takes Up The Case Of Rey Against The Armies Of The Internet

“Even though it comes near the beginning of Jenkins’ career, Moonlight feels like the fulfillment of an inner world that has been under pressure within him for a very long time.”
Richard Brody Feels A Thrill

“Berlusconi’s nothing compared to Trump, because the action of Berlusconi affects Italy only and the action of Trump would affect the whole world. And I don’t believe that people can be so blinded to vote for him. I refuse to believe that. I would not be able to work in the street or look at people anymore if that happened! F—ed-up souls.”
Francesco Rosi Talks Politics But Says Fire At Sea Is Not Political

“Chicago locations are used as backdrops to movies and television series, but how many movies get the gritty, rub-it-between-your-fingers texture of the streets and sidewalks and alleyways?”
Ten Films That Capture The Sensations Of A City, By Ray Pride

MCN Curated Headlines

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“Let me put this bluntly, in language even a busy blogger can understand: Criticism — and its humble cousin, reviewing — is not a democratic activity. It is, or should be, an elite enterprise, ideally undertaken by individuals who bring something to the party beyond their hasty, instinctive opinions of a book (or any other cultural object). It is work that requires disciplined taste, historical and theoretical knowledge and a fairly deep sense of the author’s (or filmmaker’s or painter’s) entire body of work, among other qualities.”
~ Richard Schickel

“When Barry Jenkins introduced Moonlight, he said he hoped we see ourselves in the characters. We’re thrown into neighborhood combat with 10-year-old Chiron in Miami’s Liberty City where the empty lots, abandoned buildings, sidewalks — the shortcuts and escape routes — are his total known world. We intake vividly, like a 10-year-old, the cruel, the generous, the strangeness of others, the crack-addled neglect in a home he can’t escape. Jenkins’ characters’ lives move on, get stunted, are dulled to stupefaction, end tragically, end in separation. Moonlight is Chiron’s world. It’s the current lower-middle class, working class, disenfranchised- and-alienated-class world. Intimacy is Jenkins’ accomplishment. But, what we’re intimate with is another consciousness so totally and truthfully created, that we’re looking outward and inward simultaneously. That’s why Jenkins’ work is profound. Chiron is us and we are him, asking ourselves, ‘Who am I? Where do I fit?'”
~ Michael Mann On Moonlight