MCN Curated Headlines Archive for July, 2016

“I can trace my deepening love and appreciation for cinema directly from one viewing of Point Break to another. I would have first caught it piecemeal on network television in junior and senior high, swept up in the narrative and literally sensational setpieces; next, on DVD in college, enamored with its poetry and moral ambiguity; and, finally, during multiple viewings on DVD and Blu-ray, astonished anew at the total extraordinary package. It is a film firing on every conceivable cylinder, its exhilarating blend of action, morality, comedy, politics, spirituality and subversive-bordering-on-queer romance adding up to a genuinely poetic exploitation film in which every life has value.”
Stephen Cone On Point Break

“Even though it’s fun to describe the scene as two guys talking about God, I spent many sleepless nights getting the choreography down.”
Behind The 18-Minute Powerhouse Centerpiece Of Indignation

this bradley cooper thing has me so upset im burning all his dvds
I have a list of celebrities that support Socialism I refuse to spend another $ on. Add this one. Boycott them all.

American Sniper Random Fans Disapprove Of Bradley Cooper Attending DNC

variety

“The first thing he’d ask when a new actor came on set was, “Did you eat?” That was a big thing for him: ‘Get him some food!’ You thought you were in somebody’s kitchen, having a cup of coffee. That sets the mood.”
Hector Elizondo On Being Garry Marshall’s “Lucky Charm” On All 18 Features

hollywoodreporter.com

There are too many mediocre shows on television, but at a time when the industry has glut of series that fail to have an impact, we’ve been able to give fans what they want: adventurous storytelling with original voices.”
Netflix To Spend More Than $6 Billion On Originals And Acquisitions

“The only ones I would really want to work with are Martin Scorsese and Woody Allen. If one of their films were suitable for me, it would be like touching the sky with my hand.”
“I am fine filming in Spanish, thank you,” Says Argentine Great Ricardo Darín

MCN Curated Headlines

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“The worst thing that we have in today’s movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. It’s the destruction of our business. I have such respect and admiration for film criticism. When I was growing up film criticism was a real art. And there was intellect that went into that. And you would read Pauline’s Kael’s reviews, or some others, and that doesn’t exist anymore. Now it’s about a number. A compounded number of how many positives vs. negatives. Now it’s about, ‘What’s your Rotten Tomatoes score?’ And that’s sad, because the Rotten Tomatoes score was so low on Batman v Superman I think it put a cloud over a movie that was incredibly successful. People don’t realize what goes into making a movie like that. It’s mind-blowing. It’s just insane, it’s hurting the business, it’s getting people to not see a movie. In Middle America it’s, ‘Oh, it’s a low Rotten Tomatoes score so I’m not going to go see it because it must suck.’ But that number is an aggregate and one that nobody can figure out exactly what it means, and it’s not always correct. I’ve seen some great movies with really abysmal Rotten Tomatoes scores. What’s sad is film criticism has disappeared. It’s really sad.”
~ Brett Ratner Has A Sad

“The loss of a local newspaper critic is a real loss. People who know the local audience and know the local cultural scene are very important resources. You can’t just substitute the stuff that comes in from nowhere through syndication or the wire. I think at the same time, some of the newer outlets have really beefed up and improved their coverage and made room for criticism. The real problem is in the more specialized art forms — fine arts, classical music, dance and jazz, say. There is a real slowing of critical voices, partly because those art forms have smaller audiences. Newspapers and magazines can say that doesn’t get enough traffic, so we don’t have room for that. To me, that’s especially worrisome. This is the opposite of what newspapers are supposed to do, which is not to try to figure out what people are already interested in and recite that back to them, but to hopefully guide them to something that they should be interested in, connecting potential audiences with more interesting work.

“Then again, not everyone needs a critic. People have been going to movies for more than 100 years now, and probably the vast majority of those people have not read movie reviews or cared what critics thought. But there has always been an important subset that wants to know more, that wants to think about what they’ve seen and what they’re going to see, and wants someone to think along with. I think critics are important, not just as dispensers of consumer advice — though that’s certainly part of it, too — but as trusted voices and companions for people to argue with in your head when you’re going to movies or afterwards.”
~ A. O. Scott