MCN Curated Headlines Archive for March, 2016

wsj

“The concepts of clearances are antiquated and don’t apply to modern-day society.”
“This business has changed an awful lot. This is a legacy practice and the time has come to move on.”
Fox Ends “Clearances” For Exclusive Exhibition Rights

“I want you to be forced to just exist in the moment that we’re filming, and I’m casting you because I want you to be you. I like you, I like how you talk, I like the kinds of jokes you make, do those in my movie; don’t go create a character that’s something else.”
Joe Swanberg Keynotes SxSW 73m vid
AndRichard Brody Roundly Approves Of “The Lessons Of Film School, Distilled In One Speech”

“Considering these frustrations, the fact that DVDs of such films come out at all is sometimes a small miracle.”
Tina Hassania Says Small Video Labels Aren’t Distributing Enough Films Directed By Women… But It’s Complicated
“But if you really want to highlight women’s historical contributions to film,  you also have to look past the director’s chair. Our producers have made a point of focusing supplemental features on the many crucial ways that women have shaped our film culture.”
AndCriterion’s Peter Becker Responds

NY Times

”Censorship is denying a voice. That film has been denied a platform, but it certainly hasn’t been denied a voice.”
Anti-Vaccination Polemic Pulled From Tribeca Gets Angelika Berth; Whether It’s A Four-Wall Theater Rental Unanswered By Times
AndDistributor Cinema Libre Offers Their Side

“Those films feel very alive. I don’t think Jeanne Dielman has taken one wrinkle. The intensity of loneliness is always of today.”
Eric Hynes Talks To Babette Mangolte About Chantal Akerman

“It was certainly —-king humorless, there was nothing funny going on in that world whatsoever.”
Kevin Smith Says Batman v Superman Shows “Fundamental Misunderstanding” Of Its Protagonists

“It was Meryl’s weakness, not her strength, that convinced Hoffman.”
Michael Schulman On When Meryl Streep Launched Her “Legend”

MCN Curated Headlines

The Pope on: "ABC’s decision to cancel 'Roseanne' feels like a gutsy move. It looks like a stand against racism, a line drawn in the sand to delineate what is reasonable and what is not. It even looks like a data point in the 'How do we separate the art from the artist?' debate, and it offers a heartening answer: We don’t have to, because, in this case, ABC will not finance that artist. It’s somehow even more heartening because it comes from a massive corporate conglomerate that might lose money by making this decision. It feels remarkably just. It feels decent. I’m thrilled that Roseanne has been canceled. It was the right thing to do. But it doesn’t feel correct to hold up ABC as a new bastion of decency, either. 'Roseanne' felt like the Titanic, a ship that seemed too big to turn around — but in the aftermath of Barr’s tweet, it also seemed like a ship that was doomed. ABC’s decision to cancel Roseanne is a good thing, but it also seems like a decision to shut down something that was about to implode anyhow. With a little more context, it looks like a network taking a strong stance against racism… in a way that also rids them of a show that was about to fall apart anyhow."

Sergio on: "Even though the Marvel series are TV shows, Netflix has become entranced by this notion of the '13-hour movie' when developing a season. This format mashup does a disservice to both mediums. Television's strength lies in episodic structure, which allows writers to explore different tones, characters, story structure and conflict. Movies allow a filmmaker to hone in on one or two central themes, attack it from multiple angles and get out. Netflix’s model takes the most incompatible parts of each and slaps them together, creating a lumbering mutant medium. The '13-hour movie' model means we don’t get the brevity of a film or the variation of television; it means we get the singular focus of movies stretched out to television length. It’s exhausting and it does these heroes no favors."

tidalmediainc on: Black Panther: $387 Million Worldwide

Frances Aubrey on: David Klion On “Unlearning Woody Allen”

Ray Pride on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

YancySkancy on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Debbie on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Warren on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Amazing GBG on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch