MCN Curated Headlines Archive for February, 2016

“The Cliftex continues to make, and reinforce, memories for its town’s residents, many of whom show up to socialize under the marquee’s blue-and-green neon when the box office opens a half-hour before showtime. ‘You can see everybody in this town that you want to see in 30 minutes.'”
Clifton, Texas’ 150-Seat Cliftex Theater Turns 100

variety

“These nationalists don’t deal with the actual film. They use the film as a pretext to rouse patriotic sentiment and give vent to their neverending obsession with a supposed worldwide Jewish-German-leftwing-liberal-Russian conspiracy against Poland. It’s their outrageous xenophobic statements that do damage to our reputation abroad—not my film.”
Polish Public Television Prefaces Broadcast Of Ida With 12-Minute Attack 

NY Times

“We don’t care, and yet somehow we must because there’s a lot at stake. I mean, no Rivette in the necrology montage? What kind of world is this? Well, this world—one in which our host stood up for less racism, then cracked a joke about the academy’s accountants being cute Asian kids who make our iPhones. Comedy’s messy!”
Dargis, Morris & Scott Review Oscar Evening

Spoils Shared By Spotlight, Revenant, Fury Road

“Roger Ebert wasn’t bad. He was a true film lover at least, a failed filmmaker, which gave him a great deal of insight. His passion for film was contagious and he shared this with his fans. He loved films and his contribution to cinema as a result was positive. Now we have a pack of diseased vultures pecking at the bones of a dying carcass. Trying to peck to the rhythm of the consensus. I applaud any filmgoer who values their own opinion enough to not base it on what the pack-mentality say is good or bad.”
Alex Proyas Reads His Gods Of Egypt Reviews And Posts To Facebook

NY Times

“We know you couldn’t break your contracts this year, but we are putting you on notice: If you want to have another all-white Oscars, we will cut you off,” Mr. Sharpton said, as the jam-packed church erupted with cheers. “We cannot and will not have the face of American culture exclude us.”
Cieply & Barnes Align Oscar Broadcast Doubts

“Oscars are based on visibility and resonance. A movie studio’s marketing dollars give a film visibility. Resonance is partly up to timing, but mostly it’s up to us, the audience. It’s our empathy in the dark of movie theatre that just might change the nominees list next year.”
TIFF’s Cameron Bailey On Inclusiveness

MCN Curated Headlines

liza antelo on: Farewell Andrea Gronvall, Critic, Journslist, ‘Siskel & Ebert’ Producer, Longtime MCN Contributor

Troy on: Jan-Michael Vincent Was 73

eht% on: Kubrick by Weegee

Thawn Chwithy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Some Random Troll on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Trenton Moore on: Philadelphia Film Critics Circle Nod Roma as Best Film, Cinematography and Foreign Film

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Karen Christy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

The Pope on: "ABC’s decision to cancel 'Roseanne' feels like a gutsy move. It looks like a stand against racism, a line drawn in the sand to delineate what is reasonable and what is not. It even looks like a data point in the 'How do we separate the art from the artist?' debate, and it offers a heartening answer: We don’t have to, because, in this case, ABC will not finance that artist. It’s somehow even more heartening because it comes from a massive corporate conglomerate that might lose money by making this decision. It feels remarkably just. It feels decent. I’m thrilled that Roseanne has been canceled. It was the right thing to do. But it doesn’t feel correct to hold up ABC as a new bastion of decency, either. 'Roseanne' felt like the Titanic, a ship that seemed too big to turn around — but in the aftermath of Barr’s tweet, it also seemed like a ship that was doomed. ABC’s decision to cancel Roseanne is a good thing, but it also seems like a decision to shut down something that was about to implode anyhow. With a little more context, it looks like a network taking a strong stance against racism… in a way that also rids them of a show that was about to fall apart anyhow."

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“I always thought that once I had lived in Chicago for a while, it would be interesting to do a portrait of the city – but to do it at a significant time. Figuring out when would be the ideal time to do that was the trick. So when this election came around, coupled with the Laquan McDonald trial, it seemed like the ideal time to do the story. Having lived in Chicagoland for thirty-five-plus years and done a number of films here, I’ve always been struck by the vibrancy of the city and its toughness. Its tenderness too. I’ve always been interested in the people at the center of all the stories. This is a different film in that regard, because we’re not following a couple of individuals over the course of the project in the way that a lot of the films I’ve done have, but I still feel like people’s voices and aspirations and hopes are at the center of this series.

It wasn’t easy. We started back in July 2018, it was actually on the Fourth of July – that was our first shoot. It’s like most documentaries in that the further you go along the more involved and obsessed you get, and you just start shooting more and more and more. We threw ourselves into this crazy year in Chicago. We got up every day and tried to figure out if we should be out shooting or not, and what it is we should shoot. We were trying to balance following this massive political story of the mayor’s race and these significant moments like the Laquan McDonald trial with taking the pulse of people in the city that we encounter along the way and getting a sense of their lives and what it means to live here. By election day, Zak Piper, our producer, had something like six cameras out in the field. You could double-check that, it might have been seven. We had this organized team effort to hit all the candidates as they were voting, if they hadn’t already voted. We hit tons of polling places, were at the Board of Elections and then were at the parties for the candidates that we had been able to follow closely. Then of course, we were trying to make sure we were at the parties of the candidates who made it to the runoff. So, yeah, it was kind of a monster.”
~ Steve James On City So Real

“I really want to see The Irishman. I’ve heard it’s big brother Martin Scorsese’s masterpiece. But I really can’t find the time. The promotion schedule is so tight, there’s no opportunity to see a three and a half-hour movie. But I really want to see it. In 2017, right before Okja’s New York premiere, I had the chance to go to Scorsese’s office, which is in the DGA building. There’s a lovely screening room there, too, with film prints that he’s collected. I talked to him for about an hour. There’s no movie he hasn’t seen, even Korean films. We talked about what he’s seen and his past work. It was a glorious day. I’ve loved his work since I was in college. Who doesn’t? Anyone involved with movies must feel the same way.”
~ Bong Joon-ho