MCN Curated Headlines Archive for February, 2016

“The Cliftex continues to make, and reinforce, memories for its town’s residents, many of whom show up to socialize under the marquee’s blue-and-green neon when the box office opens a half-hour before showtime. ‘You can see everybody in this town that you want to see in 30 minutes.'”
Clifton, Texas’ 150-Seat Cliftex Theater Turns 100

variety

“These nationalists don’t deal with the actual film. They use the film as a pretext to rouse patriotic sentiment and give vent to their neverending obsession with a supposed worldwide Jewish-German-leftwing-liberal-Russian conspiracy against Poland. It’s their outrageous xenophobic statements that do damage to our reputation abroad—not my film.”
Polish Public Television Prefaces Broadcast Of Ida With 12-Minute Attack 

NY Times

“We don’t care, and yet somehow we must because there’s a lot at stake. I mean, no Rivette in the necrology montage? What kind of world is this? Well, this world—one in which our host stood up for less racism, then cracked a joke about the academy’s accountants being cute Asian kids who make our iPhones. Comedy’s messy!”
Dargis, Morris & Scott Review Oscar Evening

Spoils Shared By Spotlight, Revenant, Fury Road

“Roger Ebert wasn’t bad. He was a true film lover at least, a failed filmmaker, which gave him a great deal of insight. His passion for film was contagious and he shared this with his fans. He loved films and his contribution to cinema as a result was positive. Now we have a pack of diseased vultures pecking at the bones of a dying carcass. Trying to peck to the rhythm of the consensus. I applaud any filmgoer who values their own opinion enough to not base it on what the pack-mentality say is good or bad.”
Alex Proyas Reads His Gods Of Egypt Reviews And Posts To Facebook

NY Times

“We know you couldn’t break your contracts this year, but we are putting you on notice: If you want to have another all-white Oscars, we will cut you off,” Mr. Sharpton said, as the jam-packed church erupted with cheers. “We cannot and will not have the face of American culture exclude us.”
Cieply & Barnes Align Oscar Broadcast Doubts

“Oscars are based on visibility and resonance. A movie studio’s marketing dollars give a film visibility. Resonance is partly up to timing, but mostly it’s up to us, the audience. It’s our empathy in the dark of movie theatre that just might change the nominees list next year.”
TIFF’s Cameron Bailey On Inclusiveness

MCN Curated Headlines

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“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
James Gray

“I’m an unusual producer because I control the destiny of a lot of the films I’ve done. Most of them are in perfect states of restoration and preservation and distribution, and I aim to keep them in distribution. HanWay Films, which is my sales company, has a 500-film catalogue, which is looked after and tended like a garden. I’m still looking after my films in the catalogue and trying to get other people to look after their films, which we represent intellectually, to try to keep them alive. A film has to be run through a projector to be alive, unfortunately, and those electric shadows are few and far between now. It’s very hard to go and see films in a movie house. I was always involved with the sales and marketing of my films, right up from The Shout onwards. I’ve had good periods, but I also had a best period because the film business was in its best period then. You couldn’t make The Last Emperor today. You couldn’t make The Sheltering Sky today. You couldn’t make those films anymore as independent films. There are neither the resources nor the vision within the studios to go to them and say, “I want to make a film about China with no stars in it.”Then, twenty years ago, I thought, “OK, I’m going to sell my own films but I don’t want to make it my own sales company.” I wanted it to be for me but I wanted to make it open for every other producer, so they don’t feel that they make a film but I get the focus. So, it’s a company that is my business and I’m involved with running it in a certain way, but I’m not seen as a competitor with other people that use it. It’s used by lots of different producers apart from me. When I want to use it, however, it’s there for me and I suppose I’m planning to continue making all my films to be sold by HanWay. I don’t have to, but I do because it’s in my building and the marketing’s here, and I can do it like that. Often, it sounds like I’m being easy about things, but it’s much more difficult than it sounds. It’s just that I’ve been at it for a long time and there’s lots of fat and security around my business. I know how to make films, but it’s not easy—it’s become a very exacting life.”
~ Producer Jeremy Thomas