MCN Curated Headlines Archive for January, 2016

Ensemble: Spotlight; Larson, DiCaprio; Supporting: Vikander, Elba; Stunts: Mad Max: Fury Road
The Complete 2016 SAG Film Awards List

NY Times

“No matter how much the industry and its media minions seem determined to turn Sundance into a snowy exurb of Hollywood, the festival continues to push against the mainstream tide through some of its selections.”
Manohla Dargis Reports From Sundance

NY Times

“If the academy is out of touch, what does that make me? A dinosaur. A stagecoach driver in the age of Uber. An old man yelling at a cloud.”
A. O. Scott Previews His Forthcoming “Better Living Through Criticism”

“Ira Sachs has become the quintessential auteur of today’s New York–the one of class inequality, and of relationships transformed by the changing city around them.”
Bilge Ebiri Salutes Sundance’s Little Men

“The internet I do use, mostly email, and it’s a fine instrument. Those who read gain the world, and those who are too much on the internet lose it.”
Werner Herzog In The Modern World

hollywoodreporter.com

“’You will have to fly Mo’Nique and her team out and you would have to pay for her team—for hair and makeup and wardrobe—because that’s a night where there’s a lot of picture-taking and it’s TV.’ And they said, ‘That’s not something that we do. We don’t fly anyone in and pay for anyone and put anyone up.’ And we said, ‘We understand. But that’s not something we do either. We don’t pay out money to come on your program.'”
Mo’Nique On To Oscar Or Not

“Notes may seem stupid. It is your job to look past their bad solution to the problem they are responding to–and come up with a better solution.”
Zoe Kazan’s “Useful Lessons I Have Learned From Having Screenwriters For Parents”

hollywoodreporter.com

“Baseball and football have taken proactive steps to solve the problem and have made significant progress. The Academy has now embarked on a path that will hopefully also produce positive results with enough effort and intent.”
Democratic Political Operative Donna Brazile Has An Oscar Campaign Written In Deadly Politic-ese

“We trans folk are likewise aggrieved when our complex struggles are reduced to mannered gesturing as shorthand for stereotypical gender behaviours, especially when played equally to the Academy as to the gallery.”
Australian Trans Woman Cerise Howard On The Danish Girl

variety

People Magazine Took On A “H’wd Blackout”—In 1996
“Although Hollywood’s executive corps is clearly too vanilla, why launch your assault at this time, when significant inroads are being made? Protests and picketing are passe. There is growing resentment in this country against anything that smells of affirmative action. No matter what anyone tells you, Hollywood hires on merit, and the opportunities are there.”
AndA 62-Year-Old Peter Bart Dismissed The Idea

“The show is distinctive in its sparseness, its fixed and almost obsessive concentration on Nichols’ face and voice. Beyond the substance of the film, its very form is May’s highest tribute to Nichols: she can’t stop looking at him and listening to him.”
Richard Brody‘s Bittersweet Appreciation Of Elaine May’s Mike Nichols American Masters Doc

“This is a guy who discovered, nurtured, befriended, defended more great writers than just about anyone.”
Esquire Ejects Editor-In-Chief After 19 Years

MCN Curated Headlines

The Pope on: "ABC’s decision to cancel 'Roseanne' feels like a gutsy move. It looks like a stand against racism, a line drawn in the sand to delineate what is reasonable and what is not. It even looks like a data point in the 'How do we separate the art from the artist?' debate, and it offers a heartening answer: We don’t have to, because, in this case, ABC will not finance that artist. It’s somehow even more heartening because it comes from a massive corporate conglomerate that might lose money by making this decision. It feels remarkably just. It feels decent. I’m thrilled that Roseanne has been canceled. It was the right thing to do. But it doesn’t feel correct to hold up ABC as a new bastion of decency, either. 'Roseanne' felt like the Titanic, a ship that seemed too big to turn around — but in the aftermath of Barr’s tweet, it also seemed like a ship that was doomed. ABC’s decision to cancel Roseanne is a good thing, but it also seems like a decision to shut down something that was about to implode anyhow. With a little more context, it looks like a network taking a strong stance against racism… in a way that also rids them of a show that was about to fall apart anyhow."

Sergio on: "Even though the Marvel series are TV shows, Netflix has become entranced by this notion of the '13-hour movie' when developing a season. This format mashup does a disservice to both mediums. Television's strength lies in episodic structure, which allows writers to explore different tones, characters, story structure and conflict. Movies allow a filmmaker to hone in on one or two central themes, attack it from multiple angles and get out. Netflix’s model takes the most incompatible parts of each and slaps them together, creating a lumbering mutant medium. The '13-hour movie' model means we don’t get the brevity of a film or the variation of television; it means we get the singular focus of movies stretched out to television length. It’s exhausting and it does these heroes no favors."

tidalmediainc on: Black Panther: $387 Million Worldwide

Frances Aubrey on: David Klion On “Unlearning Woody Allen”

Ray Pride on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

YancySkancy on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Debbie on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Warren on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Amazing GBG on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Why put it in a box? This is the number one problem I have—by the way it’s a fair question, I’m not saying that—with this kind of festival situation is that there’s always this temptation to classify the movie immediately and if you look at it—and I’ve tried to warn my fellow jurors of this—directors and movie critics are the worst people to judge movies! Directors are always thinking, “I could do that.” Critics are always saying, “This part of the movie is like the 1947 version and this part…” And it’s like, “Fuck! Just watch the movie and try and absorb it and not compare it to some other fucking movie and put it in a box!” So I think the answer’s both and maybe neither, I don’t know. That’s for you to see and criticize me for or not.”
~ James Gray

“I have long defined filmmaking and directing in particular as just a sort of long-term act of letting go,” she said. “It’s honestly just gratifying that people are sort of reapproaching or reassessing the film. I like to just remind everyone that the movie is still the same — it’s the same movie, it’s the movie we always made, and it was the movie we always wanted to make. And maybe it just came several years too early.”
~ Karyn Kusama