MCN Curated Headlines Archive for October, 2015

indie wire

“What brought Grantland down was not the lack of an audience but internal politics: It existed in part because ESPN wanted to keep Simmons happy, and once they stopped caring about that, its fate was sealed. That’s not to say its ending isn’t equally as depressing, but it’s harder to spin this into some kind of death knell for culture writing in general.”
Sam Adams On Why Closing Of The Dissolve And Grantland Aren’t The Same

NY Daily News

“Quentin is a phenomenal talent, a filmmaking genius. So when he or someone like him gets up and makes a statement like that, it’s felt the world around. It’s an injustice to call New York cops murderers. That is so wrong. They don’t deserve that kind of talk.”
NYDN Seeks Quentin Tarantino’s Father For Comment

NY Times

“I try to submit—I’m Muslim-like when I’m making a film. I am there to serve the film and submit to it. I don’t feel I’m God, actually. I’m merely the hand that writes.”
A Few Witticisms From Terry Gilliam

deadline

“There is no place for inflammatory rhetoric that makes police officers even bigger targets than we already are.”
“Questioning everything we do threatens public safety by discouraging officers from putting themselves in positions where their legitimate actions could be falsely portrayed as thuggery.”
Police Unions Asserting Opposition To Political Opinions Of Quentin Tarantino Now Include Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, Chicago, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Las Vegas

NY Times

“I love doing stop-motion for no reason except that it’s stop-motion,” Mr. Stamatopoulos said. “My favorite thing is a puppet not moving, just sitting there and being depressed.”
One More Major Lovely Downbeat Tale About Anomalisa spoilers, natch

NY Times

“It is aimed at sending a message, not just to Tarantino, but to anyone whose voice carries great weight in society.”
Three U. S. Metro Police Unions Advocate Boycott Over Tarantino Speech

“The Thing is now recognized as a morbid masterpiece of wretched existential horror.”
Now? Only Now? Where Have You Been All These Years?

“The public broadcaster belongs to the people: that is why the BBC is trusted in the UK and around the world. The BBC is a great legacy from past generations. It must be passed on even stronger into the future.”
The FT’s Martin Wolf Talks Common Sense About British Broadcasting

“He is a combo of cinematic architect and interior designer.”
Howard Feinstein Goes Down, Down In The Basement With Ulrich Seidl

wsj

“Alphabet’s Google To Fold Chrome Into Android”
Headlines That Would Have Been Sci-Fi Until Pretty Recently

hollywoodreporter.com

“It’s the Pauline Kael thing—’Nobody I know voted for Nixon.’ People in Hollywood are smart, but they’re bubble-dumb. They don’t know anyone who disagrees with them, and so they saw Carson as this black apostate and figured everyone feels the same way. What Rogen didn’t think, because he’s bubble-dumb, is that there’s a whole world out there, and Ben Carson is more popular than Hillary Clinton.”
THR Provides Breitbart Blogger Platform For Why He Believes H’wd Will Feel The Burn

MCN Curated Headlines

Warren on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Amazing GBG on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Roy Batty on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: 19 For Your Consideration Screenplays Await

Tom Spath on: 19 For Your Consideration Screenplays Await

James Brigham (Bigg) Bunyon on: "The Not-So-Glossy Future of Magazines"

Ray Pride on: Telluride Fest Looks Back At 44

Jose Angel Cruz on: Telluride Fest Looks Back At 44

I am Groot on: Enjoy Your Groot Soundboard

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Would I like to see Wormwood in a theater on a big screen? You betcha. I’d be disingenuous to argue otherwise. But we’re all part of, like it or not, an industry, and what Netflix offers is an opportunity to do different kinds of films in different ways. Maybe part of what is being sacrificed is that they no longer go into theaters. If the choice is between not doing it at all and having it not go to theaters, it’s an easy choice to make.”
~ Errol Morris

“As these stories continue to break, in the weeks since women have said they were harassed and abused by Harvey Weinstein, which was not the birth of a movement but an easy and highly visible shorthand for decades of organizing against sexual harassment that preceded this moment, I hope to gain back my time, my work. Lately, though, I have noticed a drift in the discourse from violated rights to violated feelings: the swelled number of reporters on the beat, the burden on each woman’s story to concern a man “important” enough to report on, the detailed accounting of hotel robes and incriminating texts along with a careful description of what was grabbed, who exposed what, and how many times. What I remember most, from “my story” is how small the sex talk felt, almost dull. I did not feel hurt. I had no pain to confess in public. As more stories come out, I like to think that we would also believe a woman who said, for example, that the sight of the penis of the man who promised her work did not wound her, and that the loss she felt was not some loss of herself but of her time, energy, power.”
~ “The Unsexy Truth About Harassment,” by Melissa Gira Grant