MCN Curated Headlines Archive for October, 2015

indie wire

“What brought Grantland down was not the lack of an audience but internal politics: It existed in part because ESPN wanted to keep Simmons happy, and once they stopped caring about that, its fate was sealed. That’s not to say its ending isn’t equally as depressing, but it’s harder to spin this into some kind of death knell for culture writing in general.”
Sam Adams On Why Closing Of The Dissolve And Grantland Aren’t The Same

NY Daily News

“Quentin is a phenomenal talent, a filmmaking genius. So when he or someone like him gets up and makes a statement like that, it’s felt the world around. It’s an injustice to call New York cops murderers. That is so wrong. They don’t deserve that kind of talk.”
NYDN Seeks Quentin Tarantino’s Father For Comment

NY Times

“I try to submit—I’m Muslim-like when I’m making a film. I am there to serve the film and submit to it. I don’t feel I’m God, actually. I’m merely the hand that writes.”
A Few Witticisms From Terry Gilliam

deadline

“There is no place for inflammatory rhetoric that makes police officers even bigger targets than we already are.”
“Questioning everything we do threatens public safety by discouraging officers from putting themselves in positions where their legitimate actions could be falsely portrayed as thuggery.”
Police Unions Asserting Opposition To Political Opinions Of Quentin Tarantino Now Include Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, Chicago, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Las Vegas

NY Times

“I love doing stop-motion for no reason except that it’s stop-motion,” Mr. Stamatopoulos said. “My favorite thing is a puppet not moving, just sitting there and being depressed.”
One More Major Lovely Downbeat Tale About Anomalisa spoilers, natch

NY Times

“It is aimed at sending a message, not just to Tarantino, but to anyone whose voice carries great weight in society.”
Three U. S. Metro Police Unions Advocate Boycott Over Tarantino Speech

“The Thing is now recognized as a morbid masterpiece of wretched existential horror.”
Now? Only Now? Where Have You Been All These Years?

“The public broadcaster belongs to the people: that is why the BBC is trusted in the UK and around the world. The BBC is a great legacy from past generations. It must be passed on even stronger into the future.”
The FT’s Martin Wolf Talks Common Sense About British Broadcasting

“He is a combo of cinematic architect and interior designer.”
Howard Feinstein Goes Down, Down In The Basement With Ulrich Seidl

wsj

“Alphabet’s Google To Fold Chrome Into Android”
Headlines That Would Have Been Sci-Fi Until Pretty Recently

hollywoodreporter.com

“It’s the Pauline Kael thing—’Nobody I know voted for Nixon.’ People in Hollywood are smart, but they’re bubble-dumb. They don’t know anyone who disagrees with them, and so they saw Carson as this black apostate and figured everyone feels the same way. What Rogen didn’t think, because he’s bubble-dumb, is that there’s a whole world out there, and Ben Carson is more popular than Hillary Clinton.”
THR Provides Breitbart Blogger Platform For Why He Believes H’wd Will Feel The Burn

MCN Curated Headlines

Troy on: Jan-Michael Vincent Was 73

eht% on: Kubrick by Weegee

Thawn Chwithy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Some Random Troll on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Trenton Moore on: Philadelphia Film Critics Circle Nod Roma as Best Film, Cinematography and Foreign Film

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Karen Christy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

The Pope on: "ABC’s decision to cancel 'Roseanne' feels like a gutsy move. It looks like a stand against racism, a line drawn in the sand to delineate what is reasonable and what is not. It even looks like a data point in the 'How do we separate the art from the artist?' debate, and it offers a heartening answer: We don’t have to, because, in this case, ABC will not finance that artist. It’s somehow even more heartening because it comes from a massive corporate conglomerate that might lose money by making this decision. It feels remarkably just. It feels decent. I’m thrilled that Roseanne has been canceled. It was the right thing to do. But it doesn’t feel correct to hold up ABC as a new bastion of decency, either. 'Roseanne' felt like the Titanic, a ship that seemed too big to turn around — but in the aftermath of Barr’s tweet, it also seemed like a ship that was doomed. ABC’s decision to cancel Roseanne is a good thing, but it also seems like a decision to shut down something that was about to implode anyhow. With a little more context, it looks like a network taking a strong stance against racism… in a way that also rids them of a show that was about to fall apart anyhow."

Sergio on: "Even though the Marvel series are TV shows, Netflix has become entranced by this notion of the '13-hour movie' when developing a season. This format mashup does a disservice to both mediums. Television's strength lies in episodic structure, which allows writers to explore different tones, characters, story structure and conflict. Movies allow a filmmaker to hone in on one or two central themes, attack it from multiple angles and get out. Netflix’s model takes the most incompatible parts of each and slaps them together, creating a lumbering mutant medium. The '13-hour movie' model means we don’t get the brevity of a film or the variation of television; it means we get the singular focus of movies stretched out to television length. It’s exhausting and it does these heroes no favors."

Quote Unquotesee all »

“With any character, the way I think about it is, you have the role on the page, you have the vision of the director and you have your life experience… I thought it was one of the foundations of the role for John Wick. I love his grief. For the character and in life, it’s about the love of the person you’re grieving for, and any time you can keep company with that fire, it is warm. I absolutely relate to that, and I don’t think you ever work through it. Grief and loss, those are things that don’t ever go away. They stay with you.”
~ Keanu Reeves

“I was checking through stuff the other day for technical reasons. I came across The Duellists on Netflix and I was absolutely stunned to see that it was exquisitely graded. So, while I rarely look up my old stuff, I stopped to give it ten minutes. Bugger me, I was there for two hours. I was really fucking pleased with what it was and how the engine still worked within the equation and that engine was the insanity and stupidity of war. War between two men, in that case, who fight on thought they both eventually can’t remember the reason why. It was great, yeah. The great thing about these platforms now is that, one way or another, they’ll seek out and then put out the best possible form and the long form. Frequently, films get cut down because of that curse in which the studio felt or feels that they have to preview. And there’s nothing worse than a preview to diminish the original intent.Oh, yeah, how about every fucking time? And I’ve stewed about films later even more because when you tell the same joke 20 times the joke’s no longer funny. When you tell a bad joke once or twice? It’s fine. But come on, now. Here’s the key on the way I feel when I approach the movie: I try to keep myself as withdrawn from the project as possible once I’ve filmed it. And – this is all key on this – then getting a really excellent editor so I never have to sit in on editing. What happens if you sit in is you become stale and every passage or joke, metaphorically speaking, gets more and more tired. You start cutting it all back because of fatigue. So what you have to do is keep your distance and therefore, in a funny kind of way, you, as the director, should be the preview and that’s it.”
~ Sir Ridley Scott