MCN Curated Headlines Archive for August, 2015

variety

“If you’re a birder, you’ll know that the birds are right.”
A Walk In The Woods Works The Details

“He begs forgiveness, prays and even gives stolen drugs back to his bosses (who don’t press charges, because he seems so sad.) There is a recurring gag that Elizabeth’s feet stink, and the movie ends with Tony washing them in a nice genderbent Mary Magdalene moment.”
Jordan Hoffman Spoilers The Rigors Of War Room; Commenters, Pray, Disagree: “It Stirs Up The Prayer Warrior Inside Of You”

“If you’re doing something that terrifies you, most likely you’re doing the right thing.”
Amber Tamblyn Talks Directing, Writing, Living

NY Daily News

“We’ve encouraged Walt Disney, ‘Put your characters out on Broadway free of charge so people don’t have to worry about their kids being groped,'” the police commissioner said.”
Disney, Marvel Shun Times Square Superhero-Shill Shutout

“If we only allow ourselves to enjoy stuff that’s somehow ideologically pure, we’d be denied most entertainment. I don’t want to be boring about this stuff, because I want people to listen when something is really egregious.”
Film Critic Helen O’Hara On Enjoying Art That’s Against One’s Principles

“When people are [called] brave in regards to playing LGBTQ people, that’s borderline offensive. I’m never going to be considered brave for playing a straight person, and nor should I be. Honestly, if I played gay characters for the rest of my career, I’d be thrilled. I wish I could, honestly!”
Ellen Page On “Brave” Actors

“You can go make a great looking movie for nothing. I just tell them, ‘Just go make something.’ The only aspect of film making that I haven’t been able to exert total control over is marketing.”
Soderbergh Sips Singani 63

“We literally asked God, ‘What do you want us to do next?’ And the Lord started prompting us to call people back to prayer and to learn how to fight in prayer. He gave us the analogy of the war room. Just like the military uses a war room to strategize against the enemy.”
Fifth Christian Pic By Kendrick Brothers, War Room, Esteems Power Of Prayer

MCN Curated Headlines

liza antelo on: Farewell Andrea Gronvall, Critic, Journslist, ‘Siskel & Ebert’ Producer, Longtime MCN Contributor

Troy on: Jan-Michael Vincent Was 73

eht% on: Kubrick by Weegee

Thawn Chwithy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Some Random Troll on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Trenton Moore on: Philadelphia Film Critics Circle Nod Roma as Best Film, Cinematography and Foreign Film

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Karen Christy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

The Pope on: "ABC’s decision to cancel 'Roseanne' feels like a gutsy move. It looks like a stand against racism, a line drawn in the sand to delineate what is reasonable and what is not. It even looks like a data point in the 'How do we separate the art from the artist?' debate, and it offers a heartening answer: We don’t have to, because, in this case, ABC will not finance that artist. It’s somehow even more heartening because it comes from a massive corporate conglomerate that might lose money by making this decision. It feels remarkably just. It feels decent. I’m thrilled that Roseanne has been canceled. It was the right thing to do. But it doesn’t feel correct to hold up ABC as a new bastion of decency, either. 'Roseanne' felt like the Titanic, a ship that seemed too big to turn around — but in the aftermath of Barr’s tweet, it also seemed like a ship that was doomed. ABC’s decision to cancel Roseanne is a good thing, but it also seems like a decision to shut down something that was about to implode anyhow. With a little more context, it looks like a network taking a strong stance against racism… in a way that also rids them of a show that was about to fall apart anyhow."

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“I always thought that once I had lived in Chicago for a while, it would be interesting to do a portrait of the city – but to do it at a significant time. Figuring out when would be the ideal time to do that was the trick. So when this election came around, coupled with the Laquan McDonald trial, it seemed like the ideal time to do the story. Having lived in Chicagoland for thirty-five-plus years and done a number of films here, I’ve always been struck by the vibrancy of the city and its toughness. Its tenderness too. I’ve always been interested in the people at the center of all the stories. This is a different film in that regard, because we’re not following a couple of individuals over the course of the project in the way that a lot of the films I’ve done have, but I still feel like people’s voices and aspirations and hopes are at the center of this series.

It wasn’t easy. We started back in July 2018, it was actually on the Fourth of July – that was our first shoot. It’s like most documentaries in that the further you go along the more involved and obsessed you get, and you just start shooting more and more and more. We threw ourselves into this crazy year in Chicago. We got up every day and tried to figure out if we should be out shooting or not, and what it is we should shoot. We were trying to balance following this massive political story of the mayor’s race and these significant moments like the Laquan McDonald trial with taking the pulse of people in the city that we encounter along the way and getting a sense of their lives and what it means to live here. By election day, Zak Piper, our producer, had something like six cameras out in the field. You could double-check that, it might have been seven. We had this organized team effort to hit all the candidates as they were voting, if they hadn’t already voted. We hit tons of polling places, were at the Board of Elections and then were at the parties for the candidates that we had been able to follow closely. Then of course, we were trying to make sure we were at the parties of the candidates who made it to the runoff. So, yeah, it was kind of a monster.”
~ Steve James On City So Real

“I really want to see The Irishman. I’ve heard it’s big brother Martin Scorsese’s masterpiece. But I really can’t find the time. The promotion schedule is so tight, there’s no opportunity to see a three and a half-hour movie. But I really want to see it. In 2017, right before Okja’s New York premiere, I had the chance to go to Scorsese’s office, which is in the DGA building. There’s a lovely screening room there, too, with film prints that he’s collected. I talked to him for about an hour. There’s no movie he hasn’t seen, even Korean films. We talked about what he’s seen and his past work. It was a glorious day. I’ve loved his work since I was in college. Who doesn’t? Anyone involved with movies must feel the same way.”
~ Bong Joon-ho