MCN Curated Headlines Archive for June, 2015

NY Times

“The nurse says, ‘There’s a man in the waiting room; says he’s invisible.’ Doctor says, ‘Tell him I can’t see him.'”
Jack Carter Was 93

“I can’t write with any real authority about Inside Out, because I haven’t see [sic] the movie, but I’m pretty much 100% positive that seeing the movie isn’t required to make this judgment. Because here’s the thing about movies: They are made of pictures.”
Profiles In Content Creation Courage: HuffPost Publishes Review Of Inside Out Without Seeing It

“An uncertain journey whose outcome largely will be determined by its ability to adapt to readers’ changing habits.”
Gannett Moves Its Corporate Operations Around

“Contemporary art’s job is to wreck what came before. Is there a better job description than that to aspire to? Go out in the world and —- it up beautifully. Horrify us with new ideas. Outrage outdated critics. Use technology for transgression, not lazy social living. It’s your turn to cause trouble—but this time in the real world, and this time from the inside.”
John Waters Sends RISD Graduates Out Into A Bitter World

NY Times

“Is the problem that we have an unfettered capacity for credulity, for false belief?”
Ben Kenigsberg Talks To Hot Doc Makers About Manipulations

variety

“The day the Oscar ballots closed, I gathered everyone in the Focus conference room, and gave a speech. I said, ‘Look, we lost.’”
Making Brokeback

“Audible and visually recognizable reactions from the public likely will taint the jurors’ own perception.”
One Hold Barred: Hulk Hogan Wants His Sex Tape Kept From Open Court In Gawker Trial 

variety

“Every step we take, we are stepping toward the goal of normalization—I love that word. This is a continuum. The goal is the normalization in having artists and films rep society as a whole.”
Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs On The Latest Member Invitates

MCN Curated Headlines

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Last night’s Oscar bizarreness was not just bizarre but bizarre in a way that is typical of this entirely bizarre time. The rhythm of the yes-they-won-oh-my-God-no-they-didn’t event, with La La Land replaced by Moonlight as Best Picture, was weirdly like that of… Election Night. First, a more or less expected, if “safe,” result was on its way—though Hillary Clinton never got all the way to the stage, so to speak, the result did seem safely in hand at 7pm., according to the polling—and the expected and safe people were ready to deliver their touching but obviously polished pieces. Then the sudden confusion and visible near-panic of people running around in the backgroun, with the same slightly horrified spirit that one felt on Election Night as shocking results began emerging from exurban counties in Florida. Then, yes—can this be happening?—the revised and unexpected result.

“In this case, obviously, the result was positive to all but the poor La La Land producers, with their earnest and spouse-approved speeches already delivered. Moonlight was no Donald Trump of cinema, and obviously a popular favorite. But the rhythm of the night was disconcertingly the same, and the sheer improbability of the happenstance scarily alike. Nothing like this has remotely happened before. This wasn’t just a minor kerfuffle. This was a major malfunction. Trump cannot be President. People don’t say “Grab ’em by the pussy” and get elected President. Can’t happen. In the same way, while there have been Oscar controversies before—tie votes and rejected trophies—never before has there been an occasion when the entirely wrong movie was given the award, the speeches delivered, and then another movie put in its place. That doesn’t happen. Ever.

“And so both of these bizarre events put one in mind of a simple but arresting thesis: that we are living in the Matrix, and something has gone wrong with the controllers. This idea was, I’m told, put forward first and most forcibly by the NYU philosopher David Chalmers: what is happening lately, he says, is proof that we are living in a computer simulation and that something has recently gone haywire within it. The people or machines or aliens who are supposed to be running our lives are having some kind of breakdown. There’s a glitch, and we are in it. There may be not merely a glitch in the Matrix. There may be a Loki, a prankster, suddenly running it.”
~ Adam Gopnik

“I think they were focused so hard on politics that they didn’t get the act together at the end,” President Trump said. “It was a little sad. It took away from the glamour of the Oscars. It didn’t feel like a very glamorous evening. I’ve been to the Oscars. There was something very special missing, and then to end that way was sad.”
~ Trump Offers Breitbart Exclusive On His Thinking About Oscar