MCN Curated Headlines Archive for June, 2015

NY Times

“The nurse says, ‘There’s a man in the waiting room; says he’s invisible.’ Doctor says, ‘Tell him I can’t see him.'”
Jack Carter Was 93

“I can’t write with any real authority about Inside Out, because I haven’t see [sic] the movie, but I’m pretty much 100% positive that seeing the movie isn’t required to make this judgment. Because here’s the thing about movies: They are made of pictures.”
Profiles In Content Creation Courage: HuffPost Publishes Review Of Inside Out Without Seeing It

“An uncertain journey whose outcome largely will be determined by its ability to adapt to readers’ changing habits.”
Gannett Moves Its Corporate Operations Around

“Contemporary art’s job is to wreck what came before. Is there a better job description than that to aspire to? Go out in the world and —- it up beautifully. Horrify us with new ideas. Outrage outdated critics. Use technology for transgression, not lazy social living. It’s your turn to cause trouble—but this time in the real world, and this time from the inside.”
John Waters Sends RISD Graduates Out Into A Bitter World

NY Times

“Is the problem that we have an unfettered capacity for credulity, for false belief?”
Ben Kenigsberg Talks To Hot Doc Makers About Manipulations

variety

“The day the Oscar ballots closed, I gathered everyone in the Focus conference room, and gave a speech. I said, ‘Look, we lost.’”
Making Brokeback

“Audible and visually recognizable reactions from the public likely will taint the jurors’ own perception.”
One Hold Barred: Hulk Hogan Wants His Sex Tape Kept From Open Court In Gawker Trial 

variety

“Every step we take, we are stepping toward the goal of normalization—I love that word. This is a continuum. The goal is the normalization in having artists and films rep society as a whole.”
Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs On The Latest Member Invitates

MCN Curated Headlines

Warren on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Amazing GBG on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Roy Batty on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: 19 For Your Consideration Screenplays Await

Tom Spath on: 19 For Your Consideration Screenplays Await

James Brigham (Bigg) Bunyon on: "The Not-So-Glossy Future of Magazines"

Ray Pride on: Telluride Fest Looks Back At 44

Jose Angel Cruz on: Telluride Fest Looks Back At 44

I am Groot on: Enjoy Your Groot Soundboard

Quote Unquotesee all »

What about replacing Mr. Spacey with another actor? Mr. Plummer, perhaps.
“That would theoretically be fantastic,” Mr. Rothman said he responded. “But I have supervised 450 movies over the course of my career. And what you are saying is impossible. There is not enough time.”
~ Publicizing Sir Ridley’s Deadline Dash

“Would I like to see Wormwood in a theater on a big screen? You betcha. I’d be disingenuous to argue otherwise. But we’re all part of, like it or not, an industry, and what Netflix offers is an opportunity to do different kinds of films in different ways. Maybe part of what is being sacrificed is that they no longer go into theaters. If the choice is between not doing it at all and having it not go to theaters, it’s an easy choice to make.”
~ Errol Morris