MCN Curated Headlines Archive for March, 2015

“I love this world, I love these characters. It is definitely a passion project for me.”
Furious 7 Screenwriter Chris Morgan Talks About The Five Installments He’s Written

deadline

“Nellie is trained in the sciences and used those sensibilities to analyze a data sample; the word “ethnic” is commonly used by casting agents. None of that works when talking about people, and race.”
Mike Fleming And Peter Bart Tapdance Around The Subject Of Nellie Andreeva’s “Ethnic” Casting Article

“The Salon piece, a late-breaking bit of Allen disapprobation, is just one of a great many you see these days; a cultural note that attempts to instruct the reader that ‘we’ can’t accept ‘this’ anymore. One almost universal feature of such pieces is a frustrating vagueness about what action ‘we’ are supposed to take concerning the unacceptable state of affairs.”
Glenn Kenny On “The Melodrama Of Woody Allen’s Critical Reputation”

“We are here to enjoy my gift. We are not here to argue. Let those people speak. We will find them and ask them to leave. I am going to handle this the way I want it handled. I’m going to tell you some more jokes.”
Cosby Does Not Countenance Hecklers

NY Times

“It is a magical moment in a marketing plan. It’s fun, even if only 45 people show up.”
Michael Cieply On Buzzfeed, VICE, CNN And Others Who Think It Would Be Fun To Run A Mini-Studio

“In another environment without drones, we would have been limited to a tripod on the street, which is not nearly as exciting as God’s Louma crane.”
Alex Gibney On Stylistic Choices In Going Clear

MCN Curated Headlines

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“Last night’s Oscar bizarreness was not just bizarre but bizarre in a way that is typical of this entirely bizarre time. The rhythm of the yes-they-won-oh-my-God-no-they-didn’t event, with La La Land replaced by Moonlight as Best Picture, was weirdly like that of… Election Night. First, a more or less expected, if “safe,” result was on its way—though Hillary Clinton never got all the way to the stage, so to speak, the result did seem safely in hand at 7pm., according to the polling—and the expected and safe people were ready to deliver their touching but obviously polished pieces. Then the sudden confusion and visible near-panic of people running around in the backgroun, with the same slightly horrified spirit that one felt on Election Night as shocking results began emerging from exurban counties in Florida. Then, yes—can this be happening?—the revised and unexpected result.

“In this case, obviously, the result was positive to all but the poor La La Land producers, with their earnest and spouse-approved speeches already delivered. Moonlight was no Donald Trump of cinema, and obviously a popular favorite. But the rhythm of the night was disconcertingly the same, and the sheer improbability of the happenstance scarily alike. Nothing like this has remotely happened before. This wasn’t just a minor kerfuffle. This was a major malfunction. Trump cannot be President. People don’t say “Grab ’em by the pussy” and get elected President. Can’t happen. In the same way, while there have been Oscar controversies before—tie votes and rejected trophies—never before has there been an occasion when the entirely wrong movie was given the award, the speeches delivered, and then another movie put in its place. That doesn’t happen. Ever.

“And so both of these bizarre events put one in mind of a simple but arresting thesis: that we are living in the Matrix, and something has gone wrong with the controllers. This idea was, I’m told, put forward first and most forcibly by the NYU philosopher David Chalmers: what is happening lately, he says, is proof that we are living in a computer simulation and that something has recently gone haywire within it. The people or machines or aliens who are supposed to be running our lives are having some kind of breakdown. There’s a glitch, and we are in it. There may be not merely a glitch in the Matrix. There may be a Loki, a prankster, suddenly running it.”
~ Adam Gopnik

“I think they were focused so hard on politics that they didn’t get the act together at the end,” President Trump said. “It was a little sad. It took away from the glamour of the Oscars. It didn’t feel like a very glamorous evening. I’ve been to the Oscars. There was something very special missing, and then to end that way was sad.”
~ Trump Offers Breitbart Exclusive On His Thinking About Oscar