MCN Curated Headlines Archive for February, 2015

“A sophisticated show for a sophisticated, beautiful beer. So we put the two together and sent it to them. If we don’t think it works and somebody’s brown-bagging a Stella on a bus and it’s not the right place for our brand, then we’ll let them know that we’d prefer not to be in that scene.”
Netflix Doesn’t Have Ads, But Product Placement’s In The Mix, Especially With “House Of Cards,” Season 3

“Long before being nerdy was cool, there was Leonard Nimoy… I loved Spock.”
A Statement By The President On The Passing Of Leonard Nimoy

The Atlantic consistently runs some of the worst film writing to be found on the Internet, which is to say in the universe… If you believe that a work’s entire significance can be found in the footprint that it leaves in public discourse, then looking at the thing itself will necessarily be an afterthought. ”
Nick Pinkerton Has 2,800 Words Worth Of The “Subterranean Hot Take Blues”

“I’m the model of the non-model, the person who can’t be categorized. But they categorize me as non-categorizable, which is the same thing in the end.”
J. Hoberman On Godard As Speaker, Thinker And Filmmaker

“So, let’s say you make District 9 and it does well. So, now, a normal director is like, ‘Shit, I’ve got this pressure because this last film did well and I hope this one lives up to it.’ I don’t have that. It definitely doesn’t bother me. The thing that bothers me is if I feel like I fucked it up.”
Honesty Not Alien To Chappie Director Neill Blomkamp

Django is a black film. More than that, it is an exemplary black film. We would even go so far as to say that it is one of the most important black films of the century… which is where some of you will interrupt us to point out that Quentin Tarantino, the film’s director and screenwriter, is white, making it impossible for Django to be a black film.”
“Thirteen Ways Of Looking At A Black Film”

NY Times

“He and I talked about how I was the intellectual and he was the humanist. I would see the big picture and he would connect with people. Even in the darkest, most gruesome situations, Bruce projected a warmth and humor that really put people at ease.
Bruce Weber‘s Obit For Documentarian Bruce Sinofsky

MCN Curated Headlines

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Dear Irene Cho, I will miss your energy and passion; your optimism and joy; your kindness towards friends, colleagues, strangers, struggling filmmakers, or anyone who randomly crossed your path and needed a hand. My brothers and I have long considered you another sibling in our family. Our holiday photos – both western and eastern – have you among all the cousins, in-laws, and kids… in the snow, sun, opening presents, at large dinner gatherings, playing Monopoly, breaking out pomegranate seeds and teaching us all how to dance Gangnam style. Your friendship and loyalty meant a great deal to me: you were the loudest cheerleader when I experienced victories and you were always ready with sushi when I had disappointments. You had endless crazy ideas which always seemed impossible but you would will them into existence. (Like that time you called me and suggested that we host a brunch for newly elected mayor of LA, Eric Garcetti because “he is going to president one day.” We didn’t have enough time or funding, of course, only your desire to do it. So you did, and I followed.) You created The Daily Buzz from nothing and it survived on your steam in spite of many setbacks because you believed in a platform for emerging filmmakers from all nations. Most of all, you were a wonderful mother to your son, Ethan, a devoted wife to your husband, and a wonderful sibling and daughter to your family. We will all miss how your wonderful smile and energy lit up the room and our lives. Rest in peace, Irene.
~ Rose Kuo Remembers Irene Cho on Facebook

“You know, I was never a critic. I never considered myself as a film critic. I started doing short films, writing screenplays and then for awhile, for a few years I wrote some film theory, including some film criticism because I had to, but I was never… I never had the desire to be a film critic. I never envisioned myself as a film critic, but I did that at a period of my life when I thought I kind of needed to understand things about cinema, understand things about film theory, understand the world map of cinema, and writing about movies gave me that, and also the opportunity to meet filmmakers I admired.

“To me, it was the best possible film school. The way it changed my perspective I suppose is that I believe in this connection between theory and practice. I think that you also make movies with ideas and you need to have ideas about filmmaking to achieve whatever you’re trying to achieve through your movies, but then I started making features in 1986 — a while ago — and I left all that behind.

“For the last three decades I’ve been making movies, I’ve been living, I’ve been observing the world. You become a different person, so basically my perspective on the world in general is very different and I hope that with every movie I make a step forward. I kind of hope I’m a better person, and hopefully a better filmmaker and hopefully try to… It’s very hard for me to go back to a different time when I would have different values in my relationship to filmmaking. I had a stiffer notion of cinema.”
~ Olivier Assayas