MCN Curated Headlines Archive for January, 2015

variety

“VOD day and date, you basically are signalling that this movie is not as good as the other movies. It’s a valid way to go if you don’t think you can sustain a theatrical run.”
Sony Pictures Classics’ Barker And Bernard On Female Films From Sundance And A Disdain For Foreshortened Windows

hollywoodreporter.com

“Annapurna is helping out to keep the doors open.”
Megan Ellison Saves Santa Monica’s Vidiots

“The biggest problem isn’t genuinely independent cinema, where lower budgets mean more opportunities for women in front of and behind the camera. The problem is the six major studios that dominate the box office, the entertainment chatter and the popular imagination.”
Richard Brody On “How Critics Have Failed Female Filmmakers”

NY Times

“The nominated shorts offer a vision of what the Academy Awards should and could be but very rarely are: eclectic, cosmopolitan, scrappy and surprising.”
Writes A. O. Scott

“Waiting for bliss is a fool’s game at Sundance, whose screeners and programmers sift through thousands of titles for a selection that’s too big to see in one movie-gorging gulp. Other festivals are bigger and certainly easier to navigate than this one, with its myriad locales and black ice. But Sundance has become the pre-eminent North American showcase through its steadily growing infrastructure, brand-building and legacy-burnishing and, of course, the quality of its choices. All the world, it seems, wants to make movies and wants to go to Sundance.”
Reports Manohla Dargis

“There’s a youthful energy. I love being here.”
Lindsay Bahr On A Park City Week With James Franco

indie wire

Sam Adams Sez Journos Not The Worst People At Sundance
“As journalists, we are being subsidized to watch movies, talk to cool people and then process what we’ve learned into articles the world can read. So lighten up, journalists. We’re here to cover the cool kids, not pretend to be them.”
But – Jordan Crucchiola Declares They Are

“They are unnerved not only that Selma threatens to become ‘official’ history, but that it represents a sea change in who has custody of that history.
Mark Harris Thinks Selma Through Thoroughly

LA Times

“The important thing is locating the cuisine or the restaurant or the chef within the context of the culture. You have to know about food, and you have to have the tools to evaluate it, but I don’t think it’s any more consumer criticism than when an art critic reviews an art show.”
Looking For “A Thereness Beneath The Thereness” In Sundance Sale City Of Gold

MCN Curated Headlines

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“Last night’s Oscar bizarreness was not just bizarre but bizarre in a way that is typical of this entirely bizarre time. The rhythm of the yes-they-won-oh-my-God-no-they-didn’t event, with La La Land replaced by Moonlight as Best Picture, was weirdly like that of… Election Night. First, a more or less expected, if “safe,” result was on its way—though Hillary Clinton never got all the way to the stage, so to speak, the result did seem safely in hand at 7pm., according to the polling—and the expected and safe people were ready to deliver their touching but obviously polished pieces. Then the sudden confusion and visible near-panic of people running around in the backgroun, with the same slightly horrified spirit that one felt on Election Night as shocking results began emerging from exurban counties in Florida. Then, yes—can this be happening?—the revised and unexpected result.

“In this case, obviously, the result was positive to all but the poor La La Land producers, with their earnest and spouse-approved speeches already delivered. Moonlight was no Donald Trump of cinema, and obviously a popular favorite. But the rhythm of the night was disconcertingly the same, and the sheer improbability of the happenstance scarily alike. Nothing like this has remotely happened before. This wasn’t just a minor kerfuffle. This was a major malfunction. Trump cannot be President. People don’t say “Grab ’em by the pussy” and get elected President. Can’t happen. In the same way, while there have been Oscar controversies before—tie votes and rejected trophies—never before has there been an occasion when the entirely wrong movie was given the award, the speeches delivered, and then another movie put in its place. That doesn’t happen. Ever.

“And so both of these bizarre events put one in mind of a simple but arresting thesis: that we are living in the Matrix, and something has gone wrong with the controllers. This idea was, I’m told, put forward first and most forcibly by the NYU philosopher David Chalmers: what is happening lately, he says, is proof that we are living in a computer simulation and that something has recently gone haywire within it. The people or machines or aliens who are supposed to be running our lives are having some kind of breakdown. There’s a glitch, and we are in it. There may be not merely a glitch in the Matrix. There may be a Loki, a prankster, suddenly running it.”
~ Adam Gopnik

“I think they were focused so hard on politics that they didn’t get the act together at the end,” President Trump said. “It was a little sad. It took away from the glamour of the Oscars. It didn’t feel like a very glamorous evening. I’ve been to the Oscars. There was something very special missing, and then to end that way was sad.”
~ Trump Offers Breitbart Exclusive On His Thinking About Oscar