MCN Curated Headlines Archive for December, 2014

NY Times

“My least favorite genre of film writing may be the ‘What Film X gets wrong about Historical Topic Y’ chin-scratcher, which generally shows little understanding of either movies or history. But such articles do serve a purpose during awards campaigns, smudging the narratives producers and publicists carefully lay down.”
Manohla Dargis And A. O. Scott Situate The Awards Season

“There are all these other people who just say they’re critics and you read their writing and they can’t write, or they can write and their writing reveals that they’re quite stupid and ignorant. Some voices have emerged that are actually quite good who never would have emerged before, so that’s the upside.”
David Cronenberg: Concerned About The Future Of The Professional Critic

LA Times

“It’s not that money is the root of all evil—it’s that it’s the root of everything.”
J. C. Chandor On His Roots Before A Most Violent Year

“Yeah, it’s the business cycle. It’s kind of like, yeah, that’s the mass murder cycle.”
“James Schamus Wants To Tell You How The Economy Really Works”

NY Times

“I was one of the horses of the Louis B. Mayer stable, and I thought the films I was given after my Academy Awards were not worthy. I couldn’t stand it anymore. Like a fire, it went to Louis B. Mayer, and I was called to him. He said, ‘We made you, and we are going to kill you.’ And I said: ‘Mr. Mayer, you did not make me. God made me. I am now in my 20s. You are an old man,’ which of course was an insult. ‘By the time I am 40 you will be dead.’”
Double Academy Award-Winner Luise Rainer Was 104

“One of Nolan’s greatest strengths has always been his control of tone, and, not unlike Inception, Interstellar is a blockbuster bathed in sadness and desolation. His works are distinguished by the single-mindedness with which he pursues concepts; the films become cinematic fugues built around a single motif.”
Bilge Ebiri Gets To The Heart Of Interstellar
Earlier – “On Interstellar‘s sincerity, and the misunderstood implications of how a movie lets you see that we’re all traveling through time”
Aaron Stewart-Ahn’s Expansive, Imaginative Defense

“We never even asked, because we knew those rights are already gone, they’re with Spielberg.”
Why There’s No Familiar MLK Oratory Is In Selma: The Speeches Are Tightly Held Under Copyright And Licensed To DreamWorks

MCN Curated Headlines

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Dear Irene Cho, I will miss your energy and passion; your optimism and joy; your kindness towards friends, colleagues, strangers, struggling filmmakers, or anyone who randomly crossed your path and needed a hand. My brothers and I have long considered you another sibling in our family. Our holiday photos – both western and eastern – have you among all the cousins, in-laws, and kids… in the snow, sun, opening presents, at large dinner gatherings, playing Monopoly, breaking out pomegranate seeds and teaching us all how to dance Gangnam style. Your friendship and loyalty meant a great deal to me: you were the loudest cheerleader when I experienced victories and you were always ready with sushi when I had disappointments. You had endless crazy ideas which always seemed impossible but you would will them into existence. (Like that time you called me and suggested that we host a brunch for newly elected mayor of LA, Eric Garcetti because “he is going to president one day.” We didn’t have enough time or funding, of course, only your desire to do it. So you did, and I followed.) You created The Daily Buzz from nothing and it survived on your steam in spite of many setbacks because you believed in a platform for emerging filmmakers from all nations. Most of all, you were a wonderful mother to your son, Ethan, a devoted wife to your husband, and a wonderful sibling and daughter to your family. We will all miss how your wonderful smile and energy lit up the room and our lives. Rest in peace, Irene.
~ Rose Kuo Remembers Irene Cho on Facebook

“You know, I was never a critic. I never considered myself as a film critic. I started doing short films, writing screenplays and then for awhile, for a few years I wrote some film theory, including some film criticism because I had to, but I was never… I never had the desire to be a film critic. I never envisioned myself as a film critic, but I did that at a period of my life when I thought I kind of needed to understand things about cinema, understand things about film theory, understand the world map of cinema, and writing about movies gave me that, and also the opportunity to meet filmmakers I admired.

“To me, it was the best possible film school. The way it changed my perspective I suppose is that I believe in this connection between theory and practice. I think that you also make movies with ideas and you need to have ideas about filmmaking to achieve whatever you’re trying to achieve through your movies, but then I started making features in 1986 — a while ago — and I left all that behind.

“For the last three decades I’ve been making movies, I’ve been living, I’ve been observing the world. You become a different person, so basically my perspective on the world in general is very different and I hope that with every movie I make a step forward. I kind of hope I’m a better person, and hopefully a better filmmaker and hopefully try to… It’s very hard for me to go back to a different time when I would have different values in my relationship to filmmaking. I had a stiffer notion of cinema.”
~ Olivier Assayas