MCN Curated Headlines Archive for December, 2014

NY Times

“My least favorite genre of film writing may be the ‘What Film X gets wrong about Historical Topic Y’ chin-scratcher, which generally shows little understanding of either movies or history. But such articles do serve a purpose during awards campaigns, smudging the narratives producers and publicists carefully lay down.”
Manohla Dargis And A. O. Scott Situate The Awards Season

“There are all these other people who just say they’re critics and you read their writing and they can’t write, or they can write and their writing reveals that they’re quite stupid and ignorant. Some voices have emerged that are actually quite good who never would have emerged before, so that’s the upside.”
David Cronenberg: Concerned About The Future Of The Professional Critic

LA Times

“It’s not that money is the root of all evil—it’s that it’s the root of everything.”
J. C. Chandor On His Roots Before A Most Violent Year

“Yeah, it’s the business cycle. It’s kind of like, yeah, that’s the mass murder cycle.”
“James Schamus Wants To Tell You How The Economy Really Works”

NY Times

“I was one of the horses of the Louis B. Mayer stable, and I thought the films I was given after my Academy Awards were not worthy. I couldn’t stand it anymore. Like a fire, it went to Louis B. Mayer, and I was called to him. He said, ‘We made you, and we are going to kill you.’ And I said: ‘Mr. Mayer, you did not make me. God made me. I am now in my 20s. You are an old man,’ which of course was an insult. ‘By the time I am 40 you will be dead.’”
Double Academy Award-Winner Luise Rainer Was 104

“One of Nolan’s greatest strengths has always been his control of tone, and, not unlike Inception, Interstellar is a blockbuster bathed in sadness and desolation. His works are distinguished by the single-mindedness with which he pursues concepts; the films become cinematic fugues built around a single motif.”
Bilge Ebiri Gets To The Heart Of Interstellar
Earlier – “On Interstellar‘s sincerity, and the misunderstood implications of how a movie lets you see that we’re all traveling through time”
Aaron Stewart-Ahn’s Expansive, Imaginative Defense

“We never even asked, because we knew those rights are already gone, they’re with Spielberg.”
Why There’s No Familiar MLK Oratory Is In Selma: The Speeches Are Tightly Held Under Copyright And Licensed To DreamWorks

MCN Curated Headlines

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“I’ve been pleasantly surprised by how many recappers, while clearly over their heads, are baseline sympathetic to finding themselves routinely unmoored, even if that means repeating over and over that this is closer to “avant-garde art” than  normal TV to meet the word count. My feed was busy connecting the dots to Peter Tscherkassky (gas station), Tony Conrad (the giant staring at feedback of what we’ve just seen), Pat O’Neill (bombs away) et al., and this is all apposite — visual and conceptual thinking along possibly inadvertent parallel lines. If recappers can’t find those exact reference points to latch onto, that speaks less to willful ignorance than to how unfortunately severed experimental film is from nearly all mainstream discussions of film because it’s generally hard to see outside of privileged contexts (fests, academia, the secret knowledge of a self-preserving circle working with a very finite set of resources and publicity access to the larger world); resources/capital/access/etc. So I won’t assign demerits for willful incuriosity, even if some recappers are reduced, in some unpleasantly condescending/bluffing cases, to dismissing this as a “student film” — because presumably experimentation is something the seasoned artist gets out of their system in maturity, following the George Lucas Model of graduating from Bruce Conner visuals to Lawrence Kasdan’s screenwriting.”
~ Vadim Rizov Goes For It, A Bit

“On the first ‘Twin Peaks,’ doing TV was like going from a mansion to a hut. But the arthouses are gone now, so cable television is a godsend — they’re the new art houses. You’ve got tons of freedom to do the work you want to do on TV, but there is a restriction in terms of picture and sound. The range of television is restricted. It’s hard for the power and the glory to come through. In other words, you can have things in a theater much louder and also much quieter. With TV, the quieter things have to be louder and the louder things have to be quieter, so you have less dynamics. The picture quality — it’s fine if you have a giant television with a good speaker system, but a lot of people will watch this on their laptops or whatever, so the picture and the sound are going to suffer big time. Optimally, people should be watching TV in a dark room with no disturbances and with as big and good a picture as possible and with as great sound as possible.”
~ David Lynch