MCN Curated Headlines Archive for November, 2014

“We never used the word puppetry, we never used the word robot. “
Bill Irwin Talks Some More About Miming The Kit-Kat Robot In Interstellar

“Entering as a blank slate allowed the craziness that comes with 15 relentless hours of Nolan world-layering and time-shifting to wash over me unimpeded, but it also meant I’d have about six minutes between screenings to consider how I felt about the movie, like a normal person.”
Robert Mays Consumes The All-You-Can-Eat Interstellar Pass

NY Times

“Mr. Rogen, who helped direct The Interview and has a writing credit on its script, has seized the country’s displeasure as a publicity tool.”
Michael Cieply Redefines Co-Writer-Co-Director-Co-Producer Seth Rogen’s Latest Comedy

NY Times

“Netflix is the one that everybody speaks about, but there are lots and lots and lots and lots of others. New streaming services are launching every week.”
NYT Only Appears To Search For Flaws In Netflix’s Perceived Armor, Including $90 Spend For Weinstein’s “Marco Polo” Ten-Parter

“There is no creative expression of artistic value that has ever been produced by ex-drunkards and ex-drug addicts. All the artists I have respected the most have also wallowed in all sorts of mind-expanding drugs.”
In First Interview Since Hitler Remarks, Lars Von Trier Claims He’s Quit Drugs And Alcohol; Sez “Shitty Films” Are In The Offing

“When he intoned: ‘There has been an awakening,’ I began to weep like Malakili the Rancor Keeper. It was a fast 88 seconds.”
Jordan Hoffman Circles Regal’s Union Square 14 And The Tease For SW:TFA

“To have a star just arbitrarily toss out draft after draft and force his staff to write around the clock for seven months is unfair and highly disrespectful.”
TV Writer Ken Levine On The Cosby Work Ethic

variety

“I miss a friend. I’d go to him even when he was doing his recovery, and I’d say, ‘-— the chemo, have a vodka martini,’ and he and I would go out.”
Scott Foundas Has A Brief Audience To Cover-Story Ridley Scott About Exodus, Nonstop Work, Why Movies Have To Have Stars For Finance, And Tony Scott

variety

“We’re not making The Godfather, we’re not making Chinatown. These films are not enough to get people out of their homes. That absence is now being taken care of by longform TV drama.”
Paul Schrader Packs His Informed Pessimism To Argentina

NY Times

“No matter how disruptive or innovative your business is, there are still ethical values that are fundamental that businesses have to pay attention to. All business relies on some sense of ethics because that’s what differentiates it from plain old crime.”
Nick Bilton On “The Slippery Slope Of Silicon Valley”

MCN Curated Headlines

Quote Unquotesee all »

Who are the critics speaking to?
Nobody seems able to answer the question of how you can make theatre criticism more appealing, more clickworthy. One answer is to be a goddamn flamethrower every week, be a bombthrower, to write scorched-earth reviews. Just be completely hedonistic and ego-driven in your criticism, become a master stylist, and treat everything in front of you onstage as fodder for your most delicious and vicious language. That’s one road. And people may enjoy your writing. The thing that’s sacrificed is any sense of a larger responsibility, and any aesthetic consistency. I don’t think anyone is following that model right now—just being a complete jerk.

Well, Rex Reed is still writing.
Ah. Well, you can also be a standard bearer, and insist that work doesn’t measure up to your high standards. But I think the art makes the standards. I’m not going to sit there and say, “This is the way you do Shakespeare.” I believe that every play establishes its own standards, and our job is to just evaluate it. But everybody’s looking for the formula for how to talk about culture so that people who don’t have any time to read want to read about it. Is there something beyond thumbs-up, thumbs-down criticism? I would hope there’s a way to talk about a theatre event in real time—meaning while it’s still going on—in a way that’s engaging, funny, witty, and evaluates the elements of the thing. But it’s like if you had a friend who was like, “Gee, are you working out? You look great. But that’s a terrible haircut.” Nobody wants that person around.
~ Time Out’s 17-Year Theatre Critic, David Cote, Upon His Exit

“Now I am awake to the world. I was asleep before. When they slaughtered Congress, we didn’t wake up. When they blamed terrorists and suspended the Constitution, we didn’t wake up either. They said it would be temporary. Nothing changes instantaneously. In a gradually heating bathtub you’d be boiled to death before you knew it.”
“The Handmaid’s Tale,” Bruce Miller