MCN Curated Headlines Archive for November, 2014

“We never used the word puppetry, we never used the word robot. “
Bill Irwin Talks Some More About Miming The Kit-Kat Robot In Interstellar

“Entering as a blank slate allowed the craziness that comes with 15 relentless hours of Nolan world-layering and time-shifting to wash over me unimpeded, but it also meant I’d have about six minutes between screenings to consider how I felt about the movie, like a normal person.”
Robert Mays Consumes The All-You-Can-Eat Interstellar Pass

NY Times

“Mr. Rogen, who helped direct The Interview and has a writing credit on its script, has seized the country’s displeasure as a publicity tool.”
Michael Cieply Redefines Co-Writer-Co-Director-Co-Producer Seth Rogen’s Latest Comedy

NY Times

“Netflix is the one that everybody speaks about, but there are lots and lots and lots and lots of others. New streaming services are launching every week.”
NYT Only Appears To Search For Flaws In Netflix’s Perceived Armor, Including $90 Spend For Weinstein’s “Marco Polo” Ten-Parter

“There is no creative expression of artistic value that has ever been produced by ex-drunkards and ex-drug addicts. All the artists I have respected the most have also wallowed in all sorts of mind-expanding drugs.”
In First Interview Since Hitler Remarks, Lars Von Trier Claims He’s Quit Drugs And Alcohol; Sez “Shitty Films” Are In The Offing

“When he intoned: ‘There has been an awakening,’ I began to weep like Malakili the Rancor Keeper. It was a fast 88 seconds.”
Jordan Hoffman Circles Regal’s Union Square 14 And The Tease For SW:TFA

“To have a star just arbitrarily toss out draft after draft and force his staff to write around the clock for seven months is unfair and highly disrespectful.”
TV Writer Ken Levine On The Cosby Work Ethic

variety

“I miss a friend. I’d go to him even when he was doing his recovery, and I’d say, ‘-— the chemo, have a vodka martini,’ and he and I would go out.”
Scott Foundas Has A Brief Audience To Cover-Story Ridley Scott About Exodus, Nonstop Work, Why Movies Have To Have Stars For Finance, And Tony Scott

variety

“We’re not making The Godfather, we’re not making Chinatown. These films are not enough to get people out of their homes. That absence is now being taken care of by longform TV drama.”
Paul Schrader Packs His Informed Pessimism To Argentina

NY Times

“No matter how disruptive or innovative your business is, there are still ethical values that are fundamental that businesses have to pay attention to. All business relies on some sense of ethics because that’s what differentiates it from plain old crime.”
Nick Bilton On “The Slippery Slope Of Silicon Valley”

MCN Curated Headlines

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch