MCN Curated Headlines Archive for October, 2014

NY Times

“Regardless of the visionary question, however, it’s pretty much impossible to think of a film that grossed more than a billion dollars and is better than The Dark Knight—or, to think of it in the way that Nolan prefers, a better film that was seen, so many times over, by so many people.”
NYT Sunday Magazine Cover-Stories Chris Nolan At Almost 7,000 Words

“If you’ve ever played in any kind of improvisational group, you know that the key to making it work is listening to your fellow players, not trying to vanquish them.”
J. R. Jones Backlashes Whiplash

NY Times

“It ain’t a lot of fun to make failed movies, and to be successful you have to be in the attention-getting business. Actually, attention-getting is the dominant thing that has taken over the media business over all.”
Brooks Barnes Checks Peter Chernin’s Progress As Well-Financed But Successful Independent Producer

“By allowing it to exist as a default, we are throwing away our freedom of artistic expression as filmmakers because someone else is deciding that our work will be seen completely differently in the end.”
Cinematographer Reed Morano On The Fight Against TV’s “Smooth Motion” Setting

“With the restored health of the publishing industry and having some sense of where this sort of Isis-like distribution channel, Amazon, is going to be buried and in which plot of sand they will be stuck, publishers will be able to raise the author’s digital royalty to 40% or 50%. Writers will begin to make enough money to live.”
No Love Lost Between Literary Agent Andrew “The Jackal” Wylie And Amazon

“The use of 3D with this explosion of images is what makes this film by an 83-year-old seem so much younger and freer than most films by directors in their twenties.”
Filmmaker David Barker Goes For Godard’s Gaga

“Really, comic-book movies have destroyed the foreign sales market. But the people want it; it’s an efficient market. That’s why I wish something like The Matrix would come out now–that was an extraordinary film. We need something like that to remind people that they can have a big movie that’s also smart and exciting.
Hw’d & Fine Talks Hope For Fine Movies With Tony Gilroy

MCN Curated Headlines

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“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray

 

“Hollywood executives can rattle off the rules for getting a movie approved by Chinese censors: no sex (too unseemly); no ghosts (too spiritual). Among 10 prohibited plot elements are “disrupts the social order” and “jeopardizes social morality.” Time travel is frowned upon because of its premise that individuals can change history. U.S. filmmakers sometimes anticipate Chinese censors and alter movies before their release. The Oscar-winning alien-invasion drama “Arrival” was edited to make a Chinese general appear less antagonistic before the film’s debut in China this year. For “Passengers,” the space adventure starring Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence, a scene showing Mr. Pratt’s bare backside was removed, and a scene of Mr. Pratt chatting in Mandarin with a robot bartender was added.”
~ “Hollywood’s New Script”