MCN Curated Headlines Archive for October, 2014

NY Times

“Regardless of the visionary question, however, it’s pretty much impossible to think of a film that grossed more than a billion dollars and is better than The Dark Knight—or, to think of it in the way that Nolan prefers, a better film that was seen, so many times over, by so many people.”
NYT Sunday Magazine Cover-Stories Chris Nolan At Almost 7,000 Words

“If you’ve ever played in any kind of improvisational group, you know that the key to making it work is listening to your fellow players, not trying to vanquish them.”
J. R. Jones Backlashes Whiplash

NY Times

“It ain’t a lot of fun to make failed movies, and to be successful you have to be in the attention-getting business. Actually, attention-getting is the dominant thing that has taken over the media business over all.”
Brooks Barnes Checks Peter Chernin’s Progress As Well-Financed But Successful Independent Producer

“By allowing it to exist as a default, we are throwing away our freedom of artistic expression as filmmakers because someone else is deciding that our work will be seen completely differently in the end.”
Cinematographer Reed Morano On The Fight Against TV’s “Smooth Motion” Setting

“With the restored health of the publishing industry and having some sense of where this sort of Isis-like distribution channel, Amazon, is going to be buried and in which plot of sand they will be stuck, publishers will be able to raise the author’s digital royalty to 40% or 50%. Writers will begin to make enough money to live.”
No Love Lost Between Literary Agent Andrew “The Jackal” Wylie And Amazon

“The use of 3D with this explosion of images is what makes this film by an 83-year-old seem so much younger and freer than most films by directors in their twenties.”
Filmmaker David Barker Goes For Godard’s Gaga

“Really, comic-book movies have destroyed the foreign sales market. But the people want it; it’s an efficient market. That’s why I wish something like The Matrix would come out now–that was an extraordinary film. We need something like that to remind people that they can have a big movie that’s also smart and exciting.
Hw’d & Fine Talks Hope For Fine Movies With Tony Gilroy

MCN Curated Headlines

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“I don’t really believe in guilty pleasures. I like to subscribe to Susan Sontag’s thought of no highs and lows. I think dismissing popular culture and popular films can be really dangerous because they may seem innocuous, but some are works of art and even when they’re not they can say so much about the culture that they’re reflecting. This also gets into the idea of canon. What is good and isn’t good? Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about that. Specifically, who writes these canons? Mainly, straight white guys — which basically rigs the system. So, if you have a knowledge of female filmmakers, queer filmmakers, African or Asian filmmakers, some people won’t give them the same culture capital. They’ll say, “Oh, that’s nice niche knowledge.” No, it’s not. You’re just seeing it through the prism of something white and male. Like Shonda Rhimes’ ‘Scandal.’ I love that show, but is it a guilty pleasure because it’s a soap on TV? No. I think it has incredible writing, incredible thought and characters, so we should take it seriously. That’s a long-winded answer to say, “Yes, I love Titanic.” I was 10 years old when it came out and my mom took me to see it three times. I was so obsessed with it. A big thanks to my mom who’ll never get those nine hours of her life back.”
~ Toronto Int’l Programmer and Critic Kiva Reardon

“A lot of us felt blindsided,” Van Vliet told me. In the seventies, Van Vliet was drafted out of film school by Industrial Light & Magic, where he worked on The Empire Strikes Back and Raiders of the Lost Ark. Now 62 and semi-retired, he said, “Once you get into your fifties, you’re pretty disposable.” Van Vliet was in the middle of reviewing DVD screeners before casting his Oscar votes, a process he estimated would take a hundred and twenty hours. “The Academy is essentially asking us to give them three weeks of labor, and then they’re going to take our results, put them into a ceremony, and sell it,” he said, referring to the seventy-five million dollars that the organization earns from the television broadcast. “Then they’re turning around and kicking us in the teeth.”
~ “Shakeup At The Oscars”