MCN Curated Headlines Archive for September, 2014

hollywoodreporter.com

“We will not participate in an experiment where you can see the same product on screens varying from three stories tall to three inches wide on a smart phone.”
Regal And Cinemark Reject Weinstein Co’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Sequel’s Simultaneous IMAX-Netflix Release

“When I have a specific reason to ask everyone to set aside their devices, it’s as if someone has let fresh air into the room. The conversation brightens, and more recently, there is a sense of relief from many of the students.”
NYU New Media Prof Clay Shirky Bans Use Of Laptops, Tables And Phones In Classroom

“The greatest sustained display of directorial virtuosity in the history of American TV.”
Matt Zoller Seitz Swoons for “The Knick”

LA Times

“Filmmakers are pushing not just our cultural buttons but the edges of their own abilities.”
Mark Olsen Sees the “New Dangerous” at the Movies and He Likes It

NY Times

The Big Chill opened both the Toronto and New York Film Festivals; as a member of the New York festival selection committee that year, I can attest to how anxious the festival was to have it, even over my own metaphoric dead body.”
J. Hoberman on Criterion’s Big Chill Release; A Preference For That Era’s Ghostbusters Is Indicated

deadline

“I make a certain type of movie and I like my creative and financial freedom. We also want to live a life of rock stars.”
Nic Refn On His Doubts And Bravado Behind The Scenes

“There’s an incredibly narcissistic function of ‘I feel I deserve this kind of person at my side and as long as you’re willing to do the work to appear like that, yeah, let’s do it.’ And five years down the line it’s like, ‘Why are we so resentful of each other just ‘cos we can’t keep it up?’ When people are documenting everything in their life and uploading it, there’s a tendency to edit. There’s not a lot of people going: ‘Got up today, was lonely, masturbated.’”
Oh, David. You Know We Love You.

MCN Curated Headlines

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray