MCN Curated Headlines Archive for September, 2014

hollywoodreporter.com

“We will not participate in an experiment where you can see the same product on screens varying from three stories tall to three inches wide on a smart phone.”
Regal And Cinemark Reject Weinstein Co’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Sequel’s Simultaneous IMAX-Netflix Release

“When I have a specific reason to ask everyone to set aside their devices, it’s as if someone has let fresh air into the room. The conversation brightens, and more recently, there is a sense of relief from many of the students.”
NYU New Media Prof Clay Shirky Bans Use Of Laptops, Tables And Phones In Classroom

“The greatest sustained display of directorial virtuosity in the history of American TV.”
Matt Zoller Seitz Swoons for “The Knick”

LA Times

“Filmmakers are pushing not just our cultural buttons but the edges of their own abilities.”
Mark Olsen Sees the “New Dangerous” at the Movies and He Likes It

NY Times

The Big Chill opened both the Toronto and New York Film Festivals; as a member of the New York festival selection committee that year, I can attest to how anxious the festival was to have it, even over my own metaphoric dead body.”
J. Hoberman on Criterion’s Big Chill Release; A Preference For That Era’s Ghostbusters Is Indicated

deadline

“I make a certain type of movie and I like my creative and financial freedom. We also want to live a life of rock stars.”
Nic Refn On His Doubts And Bravado Behind The Scenes

“There’s an incredibly narcissistic function of ‘I feel I deserve this kind of person at my side and as long as you’re willing to do the work to appear like that, yeah, let’s do it.’ And five years down the line it’s like, ‘Why are we so resentful of each other just ‘cos we can’t keep it up?’ When people are documenting everything in their life and uploading it, there’s a tendency to edit. There’s not a lot of people going: ‘Got up today, was lonely, masturbated.’”
Oh, David. You Know We Love You.

MCN Curated Headlines

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch