MCN Curated Headlines Archive for September, 2014

hollywoodreporter.com

“We will not participate in an experiment where you can see the same product on screens varying from three stories tall to three inches wide on a smart phone.”
Regal And Cinemark Reject Weinstein Co’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Sequel’s Simultaneous IMAX-Netflix Release

“When I have a specific reason to ask everyone to set aside their devices, it’s as if someone has let fresh air into the room. The conversation brightens, and more recently, there is a sense of relief from many of the students.”
NYU New Media Prof Clay Shirky Bans Use Of Laptops, Tables And Phones In Classroom

“The greatest sustained display of directorial virtuosity in the history of American TV.”
Matt Zoller Seitz Swoons for “The Knick”

LA Times

“Filmmakers are pushing not just our cultural buttons but the edges of their own abilities.”
Mark Olsen Sees the “New Dangerous” at the Movies and He Likes It

NY Times

The Big Chill opened both the Toronto and New York Film Festivals; as a member of the New York festival selection committee that year, I can attest to how anxious the festival was to have it, even over my own metaphoric dead body.”
J. Hoberman on Criterion’s Big Chill Release; A Preference For That Era’s Ghostbusters Is Indicated

deadline

“I make a certain type of movie and I like my creative and financial freedom. We also want to live a life of rock stars.”
Nic Refn On His Doubts And Bravado Behind The Scenes

“There’s an incredibly narcissistic function of ‘I feel I deserve this kind of person at my side and as long as you’re willing to do the work to appear like that, yeah, let’s do it.’ And five years down the line it’s like, ‘Why are we so resentful of each other just ‘cos we can’t keep it up?’ When people are documenting everything in their life and uploading it, there’s a tendency to edit. There’s not a lot of people going: ‘Got up today, was lonely, masturbated.’”
Oh, David. You Know We Love You.

MCN Curated Headlines

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“My father was a Jerome. My daughter’s middle name is Jerome. But my most vexing and vexed relationship with a Jerome was with Jerome Levitch, the subject of my first book under his stage and screen name, Jerry Lewis.

I have a lot of strong and complex feelings about the man, who passed away today in Las Vegas at age 91. Suffice to say he was a brilliant talent, an immense humanitarian, a difficult boss/interview, and a quixotic sort of genius, as often inspired as insipid, as often tender as caustic.

I wrote all about it in my 1996 book, “King of Comedy,” which is available on Kindle. With all due humility, it’s kinda definitive — the good and the bad — even though it’s two decades old. My favorite review, and one I begged St. Martin’s (unsuccessfully) to put on the paperback jacket, came from “Screw” magazine, which called it “A remarkably fair portrait of a great American asshole.”

Jerry and I met twice while I was working on the book and spoke/wrote to each other perhaps a dozen times. Like many of his relationships with the press and his partners/subordinates, it ended badly, with Jerry hollering profanities at me in the cabin of his yacht in San Diego. I wrote about it in the epilogue to my book, and over the years I’ve had the scene quoted back to me by Steve Martin, Harry Shearer, Paul Provenza and Penn Jillette. Tom Hanks once told me that he had a dinner with Paul Reiser and Martin Short at which Short spent the night imitating Jerry throwing me off the boat.

Jerry was a lot of things: father, husband, chum, businessman, philanthropist, artist, innovator, clown, tyrant. He was at various times in his life the highest-ever-paid performer on TV, in movies, and on Broadway. He raised BILLIONS for charity, invented filmmaking techniques, made perhaps a dozen classic comedies, turned in a terrific dramatic performance in Martin Scorsese’s “The King of Comedy,” and left the world altered and even enhanced with his time and his work in it.

That’s an estimable achievement and one worth pausing to commemorate.

#RIP to Le Roi du Crazy

~ Biographer Shawn Levy on Jerry Lewis on Facebook

“Billy Wilder said to me, ‘Those of us who are hyphenates deserve a couple more beats,’ and I knew what he meant. As a director, you make sure a scene is not beat-heavy. You need just enough beats in the rhythm. Billy also used to say, ‘Whatever you do, is your mark. You don’t have to go out and impress someone. Let them look at your work.’”
~ Jerry Lewis