MCN Curated Headlines Archive for July, 2014

LA Times

“I’m a vehement opponent of adventure. Any idiot can go to Antarctica. And any idiot can climb Mount Everest. Even grannies have done it. There are thousands lining up. There is no adventure left.”
Mark Olsen Listens In On Werner Herzog As His 1970-1999 Blu-Ray Box Set Hits The Street
And – “When you look at the box set, it looks like a brick. Like a piece of rock; I can stand on this piece of rock.”

NY Times

“What a pleasure it is to watch a film showing life as it is, not warped into a fantasy of superhuman power. You can feast on such realism in Richard Linklater’s seven-course masterpiece, Boyhood, or sample it in Joe Swanberg’s modest but savory amuse-bouche, Happy Christmas. Both films are portraits of white middle-class American families, the first set in Texas and stretching over 12 years, the second during a single Christmas holiday in Chicago.”
Holden Emits A Quiet Rave

“The paradox is that Farocki is probably more important as a writer than as a filmmaker, that his films are more written about than seen, and that instead of being a failing, this actually underlines his significance to the cinema today and his considerable role in the contemporary political avant-garde.”
Harun Farocki, 70, Made Over 90 Films
And – Jonnie Rosenbaum On The Late Harun Farocki’s Films

“What was it like, I asked this very funny man, a man whose work, whose life, has shaped New York sensibilities for more than four decades, to have had your cataracts fixed recently.”
Roger Friedman Lobs Some Softballs At Woody Allen

wsj

“It’s a financial commitment, no doubt about it. But I don’t think we could look some of our filmmakers in the eyes if we didn’t do it.”
Coalition Of Studios May Keep Kodak Film Stock Alive

MCN Curated Headlines

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray