MCN Curated Headlines Archive for May, 2014

NY Times

“Squirming on the sofa next to him, Mr. Weber flashed one of his eager grins and, after a perfect beat, delivered his punch line.”
Barnes Offers A Dippy Appreciation Of Fault In Our Stars Screenwriting Team  Neustadter And Weber

“Sack film critics and get ordinary punters in. People experienced, who know life.”
Ken Loach Brings The Boot

NY Times

“Over the past 15 years, I have sold millions of dollars’ worth of books on Amazon, which means I have made millions of dollars for Amazon. I would have thought I was one of their best assets.”
Malcolm Gladwell Expresses Surprise He’s A Bargaining Chip In The Amazon Ban Of Hachette Books
SoMaybe Amazon Needs The Money?
And
– “Perhaps the best solution would be an online marketplace controlled by the publishers—with the 30% commission being split 50-50 with the authors in addition to the author’s royalty.”
“How Book Publishers Can Beat Amazon”

“It is perhaps not sufficiently emphasized that Godard spent two years in his twenties as a publicist for Fox in Paris.”
Colin McCabe‘s Histoire du Godard At Cannes, Part Un

thestar.com

“I vastly prefer an aisle seat, because it allows me some measure of legroom and also allows me to take notes without bothering the person next to me.”
Howell Notes That You Can’t Pick Your Family, But You Ought To Be Able To Pick Your Seat

“She’s powerless at this point. She doesn’t have the work ethic or clout to be able to do what she did years earlier.”
Why No One Wants To See The Silenced Nikki Finke Resurface, By Kate Aurthur

MCN Curated Headlines

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray