MCN Curated Headlines Archive for May, 2014

NY Times

“Squirming on the sofa next to him, Mr. Weber flashed one of his eager grins and, after a perfect beat, delivered his punch line.”
Barnes Offers A Dippy Appreciation Of Fault In Our Stars Screenwriting Team  Neustadter And Weber

“Sack film critics and get ordinary punters in. People experienced, who know life.”
Ken Loach Brings The Boot

NY Times

“Over the past 15 years, I have sold millions of dollars’ worth of books on Amazon, which means I have made millions of dollars for Amazon. I would have thought I was one of their best assets.”
Malcolm Gladwell Expresses Surprise He’s A Bargaining Chip In The Amazon Ban Of Hachette Books
SoMaybe Amazon Needs The Money?
And
– “Perhaps the best solution would be an online marketplace controlled by the publishers—with the 30% commission being split 50-50 with the authors in addition to the author’s royalty.”
“How Book Publishers Can Beat Amazon”

“It is perhaps not sufficiently emphasized that Godard spent two years in his twenties as a publicist for Fox in Paris.”
Colin McCabe‘s Histoire du Godard At Cannes, Part Un

thestar.com

“I vastly prefer an aisle seat, because it allows me some measure of legroom and also allows me to take notes without bothering the person next to me.”
Howell Notes That You Can’t Pick Your Family, But You Ought To Be Able To Pick Your Seat

“She’s powerless at this point. She doesn’t have the work ethic or clout to be able to do what she did years earlier.”
Why No One Wants To See The Silenced Nikki Finke Resurface, By Kate Aurthur

MCN Curated Headlines

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“I’ve been pleasantly surprised by how many recappers, while clearly over their heads, are baseline sympathetic to finding themselves routinely unmoored, even if that means repeating over and over that this is closer to “avant-garde art” than  normal TV to meet the word count. My feed was busy connecting the dots to Peter Tscherkassky (gas station), Tony Conrad (the giant staring at feedback of what we’ve just seen), Pat O’Neill (bombs away) et al., and this is all apposite — visual and conceptual thinking along possibly inadvertent parallel lines. If recappers can’t find those exact reference points to latch onto, that speaks less to willful ignorance than to how unfortunately severed experimental film is from nearly all mainstream discussions of film because it’s generally hard to see outside of privileged contexts (fests, academia, the secret knowledge of a self-preserving circle working with a very finite set of resources and publicity access to the larger world); resources/capital/access/etc. So I won’t assign demerits for willful incuriosity, even if some recappers are reduced, in some unpleasantly condescending/bluffing cases, to dismissing this as a “student film” — because presumably experimentation is something the seasoned artist gets out of their system in maturity, following the George Lucas Model of graduating from Bruce Conner visuals to Lawrence Kasdan’s screenwriting.”
~ Vadim Rizov Goes For It, A Bit

“On the first ‘Twin Peaks,’ doing TV was like going from a mansion to a hut. But the arthouses are gone now, so cable television is a godsend — they’re the new art houses. You’ve got tons of freedom to do the work you want to do on TV, but there is a restriction in terms of picture and sound. The range of television is restricted. It’s hard for the power and the glory to come through. In other words, you can have things in a theater much louder and also much quieter. With TV, the quieter things have to be louder and the louder things have to be quieter, so you have less dynamics. The picture quality — it’s fine if you have a giant television with a good speaker system, but a lot of people will watch this on their laptops or whatever, so the picture and the sound are going to suffer big time. Optimally, people should be watching TV in a dark room with no disturbances and with as big and good a picture as possible and with as great sound as possible.”
~ David Lynch