MCN Curated Headlines Archive for May, 2014

NY Times

“Squirming on the sofa next to him, Mr. Weber flashed one of his eager grins and, after a perfect beat, delivered his punch line.”
Barnes Offers A Dippy Appreciation Of Fault In Our Stars Screenwriting Team  Neustadter And Weber

“Sack film critics and get ordinary punters in. People experienced, who know life.”
Ken Loach Brings The Boot

NY Times

“Over the past 15 years, I have sold millions of dollars’ worth of books on Amazon, which means I have made millions of dollars for Amazon. I would have thought I was one of their best assets.”
Malcolm Gladwell Expresses Surprise He’s A Bargaining Chip In The Amazon Ban Of Hachette Books
SoMaybe Amazon Needs The Money?
And
– “Perhaps the best solution would be an online marketplace controlled by the publishers—with the 30% commission being split 50-50 with the authors in addition to the author’s royalty.”
“How Book Publishers Can Beat Amazon”

“It is perhaps not sufficiently emphasized that Godard spent two years in his twenties as a publicist for Fox in Paris.”
Colin McCabe‘s Histoire du Godard At Cannes, Part Un

thestar.com

“I vastly prefer an aisle seat, because it allows me some measure of legroom and also allows me to take notes without bothering the person next to me.”
Howell Notes That You Can’t Pick Your Family, But You Ought To Be Able To Pick Your Seat

“She’s powerless at this point. She doesn’t have the work ethic or clout to be able to do what she did years earlier.”
Why No One Wants To See The Silenced Nikki Finke Resurface, By Kate Aurthur

MCN Curated Headlines

“You reap what you sow. I know that he believed for years that he was untouchable, and a lot of people helped him be untouchable.”

Promoting Human Flow, Director-Dissident Ai Weiwei Calls Trump Win “The Moment I Think History Stopped”

Good Dr. Bordwell On Heist Movies

Richard Wilbur, 96, Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Winner

PGA Expels Disgraced Harvey Weinstein

“Harvey Weinstein Has Been Expelled by the Oscar Board—Which Hollywood Sex Offender Is Next?”

“Barry Lyndon. I can’t believe there was a time when I didn’t know that name. Barry Lyndon means an artwork both grand and glum. Sadness inconsolable. What makes Barry Lyndon my own story? Have I lived to subsume it or have I subsumed it to live?”

“Tonight, I read a newspaper article about Mr. Harvey and [memories about the incident] resurfaced within me as if it was just yesterday,” she wrote in the post in Vietnamese. “I believe that I can’t be silent anymore. It’s time that I liberate myself. It’s time that I can explain about the Shanghai failure and why I shelved my ‘American dream’ as well as the contract with Weinstein’s film company.”

Barrack’s Colony Capital “has entered into a preliminary agreement to provide an immediate capital infusion”into The Weinstein Company: “We will help return the Company to its rightful iconic position in the independent film and television industry.”

“Let me tell you something that people don’t know. For the last five years, I’ve probably talked to my brother ten times on any personal level. That’s the fracture that’s gone on. I actually was quite aware that Harvey was philandering with every woman he could meet. I was sick and disgusted by his actions. No F-in’ way was I aware that that was the type of predator that he was. Harvey was a bully, Harvey was arrogant, he treated people like shit all the time. That I knew. I had to divorce myself to survive. Nobody is perfect. I’m not perfect. If I made mistakes, I apologize to everyone for not standing up stronger and sooner. And I’ll apologize for my own lack of strength at times.”

Quote Unquotesee all »

From AMPAS president John Bailey:

Dear Fellow Academy Members,

Danish director Carl Dreyer’s 1928 film “The Passion of Joan of Arc” is not only one of the visual landmarks of the silent era, but is a deeply disturbing portrait of a young woman’s persecution in the face of the male judges and priests of the ruling order. The actress Maria Falconetti gave one of the most profoundly affecting performances in the history of cinema as the Maid of Orleans.

Since the decision of the Academy’s Board of Governors on Saturday October 14 to expel producer Harvey Weinstein from its membership, I have been haunted not only by the recurring image of Falconetti and the sad arc of her career (dying in Argentina in 1946, reputedly from a crash diet) but of Joan’s refusal to submit to an auto de fe recantation of her beliefs.

Recent public testimonies by some of filmdom’s most recognized women regarding sexual intimidation, predation, and physical force is, clearly, a turning point in the film industry—and hopefully in our country, where what happens in the world of movies becomes a marker of societal Zeitgeist. Their decision to stand up against a powerful, abusive male not only parallels the cinema courage of Falconetti’s Joan but gives all women courage to speak up.

After Saturday’s Board of Governors meeting, the Academy issued a passionately worded statement, expressing not only our concern about harassment in the film industry, but our intention to be a strong voice in changing the culture of sexual exploitation in the movie business, already common well before the founding of the Academy 90 years ago. It is up to all of us Academy members to more clearly define for ourselves the parameters of proper conduct, of sexual equality, and respect for our fellow artists throughout our industry. The Academy cannot, and will not, be an inquisitorial court, but we can be part of a larger initiative to define standards of behavior, and to support the vulnerable women and men who may be at personal and career risk because of violations of ethical standards by their peers.

Yours,
John

.“People that are liars — lying to his wife, to his children, to everyone — well, they have to turn around and say, ‘Who stabbed me?’ It’s unbelievable that even to this moment he is more concerned with who sold him out. I don’t hear concern or contrition for the victims. And I want them to hear that.”
~ Bob Weinstein