MCN Curated Headlines Archive for July, 2013

“I don’t want to be bothered with deepening my connection to you as an artist. I don’t want to see you expand your story world, and I don’t want to engage more deeply with your story. I just want to be entertained. That’s all the pay-off I need.”
Brian Newman Ain’t Buying The “Transmedia” Runaway Train

“It will be the official Twitter account for Rogerebert.com, where we will tweet about movies and movie reviews, television and cable programs, interesting theaters and mobile devices, topical stories, books, politics, speaking engagements and anything that our editors and group of writers find interesting.”
Chaz Launches Non-Roger Ebert.Com Twitter

indie wire

“So this woman at that festival makes this crack about the film saying it’s cold and dead at the center. So I said to Bret, ‘What did she expect?’ Bret and I made this film, and we damn well know it’s cold in the center. That’s what it was designed to be. I personally think this film is more Bret than me. Bret thinks it’s more me than him. That’s perhaps the definition of good collaboration.”
Paul Schrader Before FilmLinc Preem Of The Canyons

NY Times

“Despite its surface similarities to the pack, Elysium indeed works hard to veer into more creative terrain, starting with the fact that it aims to make audiences think.”
Barnes Promotes Grand Unified Theory Of Sony’s Summer Films; Leaves A Penultimate Paragraph Dis To The Usual Unnamed “Box Office Analysts”

“It was a great experience to perform, wearing Google Glass, in front of a sold-out crowd of 55,000. Glass and wearable-technology is an example of another step in consumer-facing innovation that will change how we share the music experience with our fans in the future. This is relatively uncharted territory for the quick-moving developer community and I am excited to see what is created.”
Bon Jovi Have Spoken

Rogue Investor Dan Loeb Ruffles Sony
“A difficult and, by most accounts, unpleasant and meddlesome man.”
As Well As – Yahoo!

MCN Curated Headlines

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“BATTLE OF THE SEXES: Politics and queerness as spectacle/spectacle as politics and queerness. Pretty delightful, lovely, erotic. A-

“Not since EASY A and CABARET have I seen Emma Stone give a real sense of her range. Here, she has pathos and interiority and desire. I love the cinematography and the ways in which the images of the tennis icons are refracted and manipulated via various surfaces/mediators. Also, wild how a haircut is one of the most erotic scenes in cinema this year. Spine tinglingly tactile that feels refreshing. Proof that *cough* you don’t need to be ~graphic/explicit~ to be erotic *cough*. Also, it made me want to get into tennis. Watching it, at least.

“There are interesting touches and intimations as to the cinematic nature of sports, & unpacking the formal approach of broadcasting sports.Also, I was here for Sarah Silverman smoking. And also, hi Mickey Sumner!! It’s a really interesting film about the ways in which public spectacle is never apolitical, and how spectacle is prone to assignation.

“There’s this one other scene from BATTLE OF THE SEXES that I love, and it’s the one in the bar. You see Billie looking after Marilyn as she dances. Through a crowd. There’s a paradoxical closeness and distance between them. In the purple light, and the kitschy decor, everything is distorted. But Billie catches a glance and you can feel the nervous swell inside.”
~ Kyle Turner

“Our business is complicated because intimacy is part and parcel of our profession; as actors we are paid to do very intimate things in public. That’s why someone can have the audacity to invite you to their home or hotel and you show up. Precisely because of this we must stay vigilant and ensure that the professional intimacy is not abused. I hope we are in a pivotal moment where a sisterhood — and brotherhood of allies — is being formed in our industry. I hope we can form a community where a woman can speak up about abuse and not suffer another abuse by not being believed and instead being ridiculed. That’s why we don’t speak up — for fear of suffering twice, and for fear of being labeled and characterized by our moment of powerlessness. Though we may have endured powerlessness at the hands of Harvey Weinstein, by speaking up, speaking out and speaking together, we regain that power. And we hopefully ensure that this kind of rampant predatory behavior as an accepted feature of our industry dies here and now. Now that we are speaking, let us never shut up about this kind of thing. I speak up to make certain that this is not the kind of misconduct that deserves a second chance. I speak up to contribute to the end of the conspiracy of silence.”
Lupita Nyong’o